#1
Recently I was hired by my school to direct the music for my high school musical. Back to the 80's.

My duties are to gather up a band, two keyboardists, a guitarist, a drummer and Me, the bassist. I've been thinking of ways to handle this.

We have a set list of 26 songs, ranging from Bon Jovi, Madonna, to The B-52's. I know most of the songs, and the music sheets come in. I also have two solo songs to sing - Wham!'s Wake me up before you Go Go, I have an encore of the same song.

The bass work is fairly easy, walking bass lines, normal pop stuff. The pay is 200 dollars split between a five piece band - for five months of work. The drama teacher (the person who hired me) said that the pay may move up, depending on how we tackle this.

I was thinking of practice once a week, with homework learning the songs. I have to act as the band leader, and I have to help the Musical Ensemble sing.

Do you guys have any suggestions as to what I can do? We are having guitar try outs soon, because we have found our two keyboardists and drummer.

Suggestions?
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#2
make sure you get people who are into it, because no amount of practice cures those who do things for the wrong reasons.

that's about all the advice I can give.
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#3
Don't just get a guitar player's who all "Hey, look how fast I can play!" Make sure has has good tone production. And as said above, make sure the members are into it.

Also, try the bandleading forum. I think there's more advice there.
#4
You're getting $40 a band member for 5 months of work? $8.00 a month per member? Why even bother paying?

But anyway, sometimes I bet the set of songs is gonna be super cheese - however, do your best to not seem bored with it or eye-rolley. Pretend you LOVE the songs.
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#5
I do love the songs. I mean, who wouldn't love playing Love Shack by the B-52's. And thefitz, remember that we're in high school and also in the drama club here. He's doing us a favour by paying us.

The members are all into it, and I know what to look for in the guitar player. I'll also try the bandleading forum, but I thought I would post it here :/
DB Player
#6
Quote by thefitz
You're getting $40 a band member for 5 months of work? $8.00 a month per member? Why even bother paying?

But anyway, sometimes I bet the set of songs is gonna be super cheese - however, do your best to not seem bored with it or eye-rolley. Pretend you LOVE the songs.

oh gosh. I hated when my old choir teacher did that. please don't worship the music. you shouldn't hate it but don't overrate it please.

just practice your stuff a lot. people will have set routines to be dancing to you, you need flawless rhythm. focus on that, make sure everyone is perfect.
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#7
Make sure you get more than just the tech week to play with singers and dancers. One of the biggest disasters was when I was in the pit for a production of Pippin and the music director decided we would practice "separately" from the rest of the production while the actors/dancers used a keyboard player. There was alot of hostility between the cast and the pit orchestra by the end of tech week and it took many hours of practice to be half way decent for opening night.

Playing straight from sheet music is different than playing with singers / dancers. Get someone to conduct so they can adjust the band's playing for the nuances of the singers and dancers on stage.
#8
^ That.

I ran the lightboard for our schools musical, Beauty and the Beast, last year, and the people in the band were different every night, there was evenone night where they even switched drummers between acts. So at times things seemed really off.

The real key is consistency, try and do it the same every single time, do not improv stuff, do not change things on the fly. Nothing will make the production look worse, than if you play it a certain way in practice, and then change it for a show. Remember the people on stage may be using the things you do as a que. They might come in, when the drums kicks in, they might exit during when a certain guitar part comes in. So, keep it consistent.