#1
Hello

I've been having alot of trouble trying to record guitar through my Zoom G9.2tt multifx unit. I try recording guitar and it just sounds horrible, I know my computer is pretty bad, and I know I really need a better one as my computer barely meets the requirements of Cubase LE (what I want to use to record). If I record direct through the muktifx is sounds really bad and I'm really struggling with the Line Out of my amp Marshall JCM2000 TSL60 going through a small Peavey mixer.

Is there a simple way of me being able to record distorted guitar well?

Does anyone having expierience of using a Zoom multifx to record?


Ierostyle
#2
zoom isn't great in general,
what are you listening back through?
crappy headphones/speakers cant be counted on to represent whats actually going on
#3
well it plays everything back through my guitar amp, and or my crappy laptop speakers, it either sounds mudddy and dull or just thin bullshit, kind of like the guitars in my old bands demo, (on my profile page), I know it isn't sounding great cause even when I mix down and mae an mp3 of it to play in itunes it sound crappy, forgive me I'm naive to the whole recording thing
#4
aw that sucks,
i remember getting a zoom multi-fx years ago and it was horrible. if you wanna get a good guitar tone, sell off the zoom, buy a nice firewire interface and a Shure SM57, stick it in front of the Marshall and you'll be laughing. a few bucks more and you'll be good to go.

it sucks big time i know, but nothing is truely cheap in the world of recording, as i have learned over the years
#5
I own the Zoom G9.2tt and love the sounds. There are a couple of ways to record this unit into your computer. You can use the USB port on the Zoom, but I've never tried that. I plug my G9 into a small Yamaha mixer which is connected to my computer. The EQ on the mixer is flat. The mixer isn't necessary, but it makes connecting different things into my computer easier.

There are so many settings within your G9 patch to consider when trying to get a good tone out. But the most important thing to remember is if you go direct into the mixer or coomputer, you need to have the Cabinet Simulator turned ON on the G9 patch. And once the Cabinet Simulator is turned ON, play with the cabinet size, mic type, and mic placement settings.
#6
^^

more or less how i did mine.

you can check out the 2nd tune out in my profile. it was done with a zoom G2.

EDIT:

after hearing your profile song. i'll say:

Stop scooping your mids
mellow out your high frequencies
and when EQ'ing, keep the curves natural without harsh peaks or valleys.
Grammar and spelling omitted as an exercise for the reader.
Last edited by Kivarenn82 at Sep 21, 2008,
#7
Man i own a zoom G2.1u and i record by connecting it to my crappy laptop through USB and it works fine. Just as long as you keep the level relatively moderate.

Good luck
#8
I actually recorded my guitar part in a studio near where I live my old band couldn't produce for shit, actually I don't scoop my mids, most of the marshall tone comes from the mids, I have my mids at about 7 roughly my amo is in my car after band practice. I actually recorded my guitar through my old Marshall Valvestate 100w! just real bad production.
#9
Quote by ral8667
I own the Zoom G9.2tt and love the sounds. There are a couple of ways to record this unit into your computer. You can use the USB port on the Zoom, but I've never tried that. I plug my G9 into a small Yamaha mixer which is connected to my computer. The EQ on the mixer is flat. The mixer isn't necessary, but it makes connecting different things into my computer easier.

There are so many settings within your G9 patch to consider when trying to get a good tone out. But the most important thing to remember is if you go direct into the mixer or coomputer, you need to have the Cabinet Simulator turned ON on the G9 patch. And once the Cabinet Simulator is turned ON, play with the cabinet size, mic type, and mic placement settings.


Is that a USB misxer?
#10
Quote by TheDriller
aw that sucks,
i remember getting a zoom multi-fx years ago and it was horrible. if you wanna get a good guitar tone, sell off the zoom, buy a nice firewire interface and a Shure SM57, stick it in front of the Marshall and you'll be laughing. a few bucks more and you'll be good to go.

it sucks big time i know, but nothing is truely cheap in the world of recording, as i have learned over the years


thats what I plan on doing when I have the money, If I can gewt the tones for the moment though I'll be more than happy to keep my current stuff for a while
#11
Quote by akhiraki
Man i own a zoom G2.1u and i record by connecting it to my crappy laptop through USB and it works fine. Just as long as you keep the level relatively moderate.

Good luck


Maybe I need to really moderate the volume I put everything into my laptop at, I don't seem to be able to find a real nice tone that I love with the Zoom full stop though, I really want to find a nice full tone, maybe I need something else?
#12
Quote by ierostyle
well it plays everything back through my guitar amp, and or my crappy laptop speakers, it either sounds mudddy and dull or just thin bullshit, kind of like the guitars in my old bands demo, (on my profile page), I know it isn't sounding great cause even when I mix down and mae an mp3 of it to play in itunes it sound crappy, forgive me I'm naive to the whole recording thing


Headpones will probably give you a better representation of what's going on then eityher of thsoe two. try them first.
#13
I have headphones, I'm using an old copy of guitar rig as a vst plugin for cubase, that sounds alot better than the zoom on it's own, I must try recording something now I have that installed, but I'm lloking to sell my G9 and maybe buy a Line 6 Pod Sudio to record with, I'm also thinking of selling my Peavey mixer and buying a Firewire or USB mixer/Interface.
I found a nice level of saturation earlier so I must try that, I tried the demo of Guitar rig and that had some cool presets, although the version I am using doesn't seem to have all those presets. anyway I need to use monitoring when using cubase but the delay between what I play and what comes back is to long, how do I minimalise this problem?
#14
i never noticed before, but you ahve such a nice amp sitting there why don't you record with that using a mic?
Grammar and spelling omitted as an exercise for the reader.
#15
I love my amp, but it's not always practicle recording through it at home, to crank it all the way up, and besides I need some form of interface anyway to mic it up, I'm looking at a Line 6 Pod Studio UX2 (basically exatl the same as a toneport) because it has 2 xlr inputs and a 2 guitar input s, that way I could when I can mic up my amp when I can, plus I get all the VST plugins!, do like a good VST amp plugin, always handy to have effects at you disposal, I got a version of guitar rig 3 given to me the other day, can't stop a slight popping sound every now and again through cubase, but I've stopped the latency issues I think.
Besides I have no expierience micing up my amp, it has an xlr emulated out on the back but I still need something to go into, maybe I could get the pod studio then xlr my TSL60 to it?
#16
Quote by Kivarenn82
i never noticed before, but you ahve such a nice amp sitting there why don't you record with that using a mic?


Thanks for the compliment to mey gear, I do love my amp head, need a better cab now! and I nice Les Paul to that would be nice!


I don't know really anything about micing up my amp and getting it to sound good!
#17
^^

cool man, miking can be pretty tough and sometimes just as cumbersome as direct recording (mic placement, sometimes dealing with less than stellar preamps) in fact its taken me about half a year to finally get a tone i'm consistently happy with out of my line 6 pod XT.

with miking, sometimes you can get lucky and just get a satisfactory tone by popping a mic in front of it.
or sometimes you'll be fiddling around for DAYS.. WEEKS.. maybe a month getting that perfect tone if you're not entirely sure where to start, or how to diagnose a particular part of the tone you're having a problem with.
Grammar and spelling omitted as an exercise for the reader.
#18
Well I will have to get hold of a nice Shure '57 mic and try at some point, next time I get to go into a studio I will try it all out, I might try and borrow a Marshall 1960 cab for my amp to really help out a bit, I must learn all about it and stuff. must get the line 6 stuff, then I can edit my amp sound once I have actually recorded the guitar itself, which sounds pretty useful, by using VST, looking forward to trying all this!