#1
I dont post in the acoustic forum much but i had posted a few days ago talking about my bridge coming off my classical guitar, it didnt break when it came off it just came clean off. somebody suggested that i use "locktite" to fix the bridge.
will that hold up to the string tension?
Quote by letsgocoyote
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#2
You need to get it properly glued or else the guitar won't sound like it should.
Equipment:
- Art & Lutherie Cedar CW (SOLD! )
- Martin D-16RGT w/ LR Baggs M1 Active Soundhole Pickup
- Seagull 25th Anniversary Flame Maple w/ LR Baggs Micro EQ

Have an acoustic guitar? Don't let your guitar dry out! Click here.
#3
Regular white wood glue will do fine. It's a pretty straightforward procedure that any acoustic has to go through sooner or later. A proper luithier will do it for you.
It's also well within reach of a reasonably experienced home-mechanic. It's not difficult, but there are a few things to be noticed to make it work. After all we are talking a highly stressed joint and an essential precision part, so there is little room for error. If you like to try your hands on it, I will gladly explain how to do it and what are the twists.
#4
Quote by Marcel Veltman
Regular white wood glue will do fine. It's a pretty straightforward procedure that any acoustic has to go through sooner or later. A proper luithier will do it for you.
It's also well within reach of a reasonably experienced home-mechanic. It's not difficult, but there are a few things to be noticed to make it work. After all we are talking a highly stressed joint and an essential precision part, so there is little room for error. If you like to try your hands on it, I will gladly explain how to do it and what are the twists.


You're supposed to use hide glue, are you not?
Equipment:
- Art & Lutherie Cedar CW (SOLD! )
- Martin D-16RGT w/ LR Baggs M1 Active Soundhole Pickup
- Seagull 25th Anniversary Flame Maple w/ LR Baggs Micro EQ

Have an acoustic guitar? Don't let your guitar dry out! Click here.
#5
Quote by captivate
You're supposed to use hide glue, are you not?


If you'd really like to do it the best possible way, yes. But hide glue is hard to come by and even harder to work with. A learned woodworker can make joints with it that can last for hundreds of years, but only if he heated the glue to exactly the right temperature and exactly the right viscousity and applied it at exactly the right moment. Special tools are also required.
Anyone not having attended the advanced wood workers academy will get much better results using regular white wood glue. It's not as durable as hide glue, but it will do its job the next four decades, which is fine for most common house hold instruments. Joints can be unglued if necessary (that's why I don't recommend super glue or any other modern high tech stuff), it's cheap and easily obtainable and most importantly; application is just a matter of following the simple twenty word instruction on the flask.