#1
Well basically I'm torn between what kind of instrument I want to play. I have access to both, but I started on acoustic because I heard it builds better fundamentals.. but in the end, I really love music played from, both, acoustic and electric guitars and would like to eventually be able to play both.

How difficult will that be, and how well do the playing skills overlap from one instrument to another?
#2
they very much overlap. bar chords n such obviously dont sound quite as good on most electrics but that aside, skills are pretty much interchangable between electric and acoustic.
#3
not at all. It's the same thing, basically.

I just heard it's easier to learn on acoustic, because it's simpler, easier on the wallet, and you can hear the chords better, there's no distortion or effects to clutter your sound.

I started on electric over a year ago, and i'm probably getting an acoustic sometime within the next year.... i've played acoustic before, it's NO different, trust me.

And if you're debating on one or the other... i'd say electric. B/c you can just do like me when you REALLY want to play an acoustic song, just turn everything off and just play your guitar by itself. It's kind of similar to an acoustic sound.

But that's just my 2 cents.
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#5
It shouldn't be difficult at all, I play both and I don't have a problem with picking up my acoustic and then switching to the electric after a few hours playing
#6
well.....it all depends on what musical genre your interested in......obviously playing sabbath on an electric and accoustic will get you different sound and feel.....there are some genres that work well on both and some that dont work at all...........but technically in terms of difficulty of playing both have thier fair share because theres some tihngs on the electric that you cant do on the accoustic,..............with the electric guitar you get a wider range of techniques to learn ....................and yes........playing skills overlap quite nicely on both instruments......their still guitars...............dont go on terms of difficulty.........play both!!.......unless theres a problem with that............
#7
Well I'm at a very basic skill level, doing some basic scales and some easy song riffs.. progressing at a very slow place playing the acoustic, and I'm afraid if I played both right now my progress would just completely stop haha
#8
you can play both. I started on acoustic and it built up my finger power but it also got me used to chords sounding good ( sometimes traditional chords are crap for electric guitar). electric got me into power chords and kinda ruined me a bit, but if you just keep at it and learn everything you need to know basic then you'll be good to switch over to elec guitar perfectly and be able to get into fun stuff like tapping and whammy bars
#9
Quote by Rizzice
Well I'm at a very basic skill level, doing some basic scales and some easy song riffs.. progressing at a very slow place playing the acoustic, and I'm afraid if I played both right now my progress would just completely stop haha

in that regard you would be super wrong, playing acoustic is probably better for when youre just starting, but you definitly wont get worse playing both, unless you get obsessed with laying nothing but power chords in drop d, then youll probably suck, other than that, it could only help

at the very least itll give you an introduction to electrics
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#10
that all depends on what you mean by "good"
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#11
Why not get a nice hollow body electric? They're electric but they have a beautiful acoustic sound. One of my friends has a hollow body Ibanez Artcore series (an older one), and I love it. Just playing it not plugged into anything sounds great. Of course it's not an acoustic, but it has some qualities of it.
#12
Quote by BigFatSandwich
that all depends on what you mean by "good"


No it doesnt

Quote by DarKAssassiN
Why not get a nice hollow body electric? They're electric but they have a beautiful acoustic sound. One of my friends has a hollow body Ibanez Artcore series (an older one), and I love it. Just playing it not plugged into anything sounds great. Of course it's not an acoustic, but it has some qualities of it.


Your over complicating this.

Theres NO reason you cant play both. For all practical purposes, there the same thing. Once just produces its sound through an amp, the other doesnt.
#13
Quote by zeppelinfreak51
No it doesnt


Your over complicating this.

Theres NO reason you cant play both. For all practical purposes, there the same thing. Once just produces its sound through an amp, the other doesnt.


I know that. I play both, and personally like the acoustic sound and feeling better than an electric. And I can't really explain it but I prefer to actually play an electric, it just feels smoother to me (but empty and lifeless). So, if he's the same way, why not try a hollow body? I had never tried one until about 2 months ago and now I love them. Just a suggestion. It's not really over complicating to me :\
#14
Difficulty is subjective. Just pick the one that appeals to you the most, and start learning already.
#15
Quote by zeppelinfreak51
No it doesnt

Yes it does. I've seen electric guitar players who switch over to acoustic play tons of power chords and consider that "good". I've seen them try to shred on acoustic and consider that good. I've seen acoustic players switch to electric who have no idea how to mute the unplayed strings and really have no idea how play a to decent solo.

It's really easy to learn the basics of both at the same time, but it's a little more difficult to learn both their strengths and weaknesses. In a sense, it's like learning guitar and bass at the same time. So it does depend on what you mean by "good". Or at least it does in my opinion.
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#16
easy solution: get a hollowbody, or semi-hollow.
you could try an Ibanez Artcore (what I play), they're on the cheap side and produce great sound.
the only real difference I see when playing an acoustic is that it requires more finger strength and more precise positioning. I can get real sloppy when I play an electric because I don't have to be as precise.
#17
Overall i think being good at an acoustic is harder than on an electric...the strings are way harder and you have to be careful about every aspect of your playing if you dont want it to sound like shit
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#18
Depends on what you play.

Acoustic is great for building finger stregenth and getting nice, full sounding open chords, but single note runs and bends/trills etc are more difficult because the strings are generally a thicker gauge.

Electric on the other hand is great for single note runs, learning pinch harmonics, and the aformentioned bends and trills, but generally speaking chords don't sound as well and your hand stregenth develops differently because it takes less pressure to press the strings.

Transitioning between the two is different as well. When practicing on acoustic, you may find you're pressing the strings on your electric so hard that you're bending the notes out of tune and making them "sour", while going the opposite direction, you may find you end up with a lot more buzzing and a sore hand from exerting the extra pressure it takes to properly fret the steel strings.

For fundamentals, sure, there's tons of overlap. However, they are different animals and should be treated as such. There are a lot of acoustic techniques that simply don't work as well on electric and vice versa. Sure, you can still do a pinch harmonic on an acoustic, but it won't sound nearly as cool as it will on an elec. Additionally, you can of course strum open chords just fine on elec, but it won't sound as deep and resonating as on an acoustic. Another thing to bear in mind is the body style of each. Holding an acoustic vs. holding an electric feels completely different in the way your arm rests, the way it fits to your body, and the way you fret the strings because elecs generally speaking have slimmer necks then acoustic.

It isn't difficult to be good at both, but I can't subscribe to the notion that "guitar is guitar". Also, if anything you have to be MORE precise on electric because a slight finger movement can bend your string out of key due to the slimmer strings. The fundamentals are the same, but in practice they're completely different.

tl;dr: Basicly, if you want to be good at both, devote an equal amount of time to both, because they're just as much different as they are the same.
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