#1
Hey guys, more amp questions, sorry.

Well, I've looke dinto it, and im thinking this might be the amp for me. What are your experinces??

Also, what advantages does the 210 have over the 115?

THanks a bunch!
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#2
Copied from F.A.Q.

2x10 – Now just two 10 inch speakers, more portable than the 4x10 but has the same glass like top end but less volume and less low note boom. It’s definitely going to have less punch than a 4x10 but you’ll still get the basic tonal properties.

1x15 – A single speaker with a 15 inch diameter. Another common speaker combination. The big speaker leads to low end that really booms and can handle the lowest of notes. I personally love the warmth and rounded quality they add to the mids and highs but others hate them and have been known to describe the low-end they produce as muddy and undefined, something I believe is down to their EQ more than the speaker size. You’ll find these guys in many combo amps and in full stacks.

Seriously, just A/B them and choose the one you prefer.
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#3
As far as the Fender Rumble itself, most people I know who have tried it say it's pretty average. I tried a 115 in the store once, and wasn't too impressed. Not really bad, just nothing to write home about.

When it comes to speaker combination, that's your own taste. When talking about 115, 112, 212, 210, 410, or 810 cabs, there all standards for a reason - they all do something well. And even less common cabs like 8x8 or 118s still appeal to tastes. Check out what they do, decide on cabs yourself.
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#4
Quote by WhyLater
As far as the Fender Rumble itself, most people I know who have tried it say it's pretty average. I tried a 115 in the store once, and wasn't too impressed. Not really bad, just nothing to write home about.


Anything else you'd suggest in that case? Looking for something that matches this:
http://www.myspace.com/dropeverythingband

Needs to be deep, and loud..(cheap too )
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#6
I gather from the wording that there's been other discussions about your amps that I'm completely unaware of so I'll just stick to what's in here.

I own the 115. Its a solid, decent amp. Nothing spectacular, nothing horrible. Its gets the job done, it sounds alright, and thus far has been extremely reliable for me. Had it for a good 3+ years now I think and yet to have a single problem. As far as volume goes, when I was still in a band it was able to cut through the sound of a drum set, and two guitars both with 120w 2x10''s with ease. Never went above 2-3 (on a 1-10 scale) for the volume with them playing at ~5-6. Granted it wouldn't have held up quite as well against a stack, but again, it gets the job done. All in all, if the volume is enough for you, its worth the money.

With the 210 I only have some experience in stores with it. Pretty much the same story. Good but not great. Not terrible either. Worth the money.

The only major difference between the two is that I've noticed a bit better low end in the 115' (duh) and a bit more overall volume from it. The 210 Was a little bit quieter, but it has a much more versatile sound. As far as sound quality, its essentially the same, just adjusted for individual need. If you need a lot of low end get the 115. If you like to have a bit more character from your mids and highs, the 210 is the way to go. Either way you're getting an amp that will do what it needs to and isn't a piece of junk.
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#7
Personally i prefer 810, so the 210 would be best for me

it all depends on what you play. the 10" will have more high frequency and the 15" will sound alot lower.
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#8
Quote by fett13
I own the 115. Its a solid, decent amp. Nothing spectacular, nothing horrible. Its gets the job done, it sounds alright, and thus far has been extremely reliable for me. Had it for a good 3+ years now I think and yet to have a single problem. As far as volume goes, when I was still in a band it was able to cut through the sound of a drum set, and two guitars both with 120w 2x10''s with ease. Never went above 2-3 (on a 1-10 scale) for the volume with them playing at ~5-6. Granted it wouldn't have held up quite as well against a stack, but again, it gets the job done. All in all, if the volume is enough for you, its worth the money.


Alright, what the **** is wrong with my Rumble? Either you're lying through your teeth or there is something totally wrong with it. I have to put it at 5 just to get over a drummer!
#9
Quote by jazz_rock_feel
Alright, what the **** is wrong with my Rumble? Either you're lying through your teeth or there is something totally wrong with it. I have to put it at 5 just to get over a drummer!


Are you standing right in front of the amp, blasting the backs of your legs in your practice room? Because I used to do this and I needed to crank a Peavey the drummer owned literally to 10 just to hear myself. Then I changed the arrangement of amps in the room and 5 was more than enough.

Also, are you cranking the lows? At a given output a bassier tone will be much quieter than a trebly and certainly a midsy one.

Quote by Fett13
two guitars both with 120w 2x10''s with ease.


Spiders, aren't they?
Last edited by Arbitror at Sep 20, 2008,
#10
Quote by Arbitror
Are you standing right in front of the amp, blasting the backs of your legs in your practice room? Because I used to do this and I needed to crank a Peavey the drummer owned literally to 10 just to hear myself. Then I changed the arrangement of amps in the room and 5 was more than enough.

Also, are you cranking the lows? At a given output a bassier tone will be much quieter than a trebly and certainly a midsy one.


I've tried every kind of arrangement you could name, I'm sure. Also, I EQ intelligently, fairly flatish, with boosted low mids or high mids depending and some tweaks with the lows and trebles plus some low treble/high mid cut on my bass' EQ to take away some noise. Other than that, not a whole lot.
#11
I have one and it handles my five string Schecter Stiletto five Elite without distorting and it's loud enough for more than a medium size room.

I like the synchronized red flashing lights at the bottom port.

I also have a new release by Marshall for a practice amp: a MB30 thirty watt practice amp with two channels, clean and drive with eq and manually adjustable compression and a neat three setting voice dial with a level dial to dial in the tone of any of the voices. Also has boost. A lot of connectivity and a ten inch speaker. Definitely not loud enough for a band but perfect for practicing or light jamming and light enough to be portable; less than fifty pounds.

Marshall is putting out larger versions of this amp as we speak. I think sixty or one hundred watt ones are also available already.

Warwick has a reasonably priced sixty watt amp that might be really nice. Worth checking into.

My son has a new SWR Workingpro 15 two hundred watt amp that is awesome with extensive tweakability and built in DI box, adjustable.

Hope this helps you out. And again, I really like the Rumble 100, although some may not.

Duffy
Winfield, Pa.