#1
12 Bars- Here's my progression
C7 F7 C7 C9 F7 F7
C7 A7 Dm7 G7 C7 C7

It's a comp pattern. stum rest strum hold or whatever for each bar - Jazzy

I'm not too knowledgeable about theory and I can't change the progression so don't deviate from it plz.
The A7 is throwing me off because it's supposed to be vi but it's VI so it's a major and I don't know how to fit that into the solo without doing some A major stuff for 4 short measures.

My teacher was teaching me that for blues, some scales I can use are pent, mixo, and blues and depending on the rhythm, I could use major and minor. I can also do these over each of the chords separately.

I don't know anything about jazz scales, I wish I did.

anyway, can you help me, I don't know what to do to make it sound good
#2
Well, unless your not allowed to use certain scales/modes, I would say you're overthinking it. Do you get what I mean?
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#4
Quote by kai29
yes and no

I can do anything but i don't know what anything is


Well...I guess what I meant was, do you have to understand what you are doing?

If so, then I guess you're limited to what theory you do know.

If not, play by ear.

Playing by ear is one of the best tools you have on the guitar. Theory can tell you if you're right or wrong (subjectively), but it can't teach you phrasing.
Quote by jackbauer
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To The Pit!



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Last edited by USAPeavey at Sep 20, 2008,
#5
Quote by kai29
12 Bars- Here's my progression
C7 F7 C7 C9 F7 F7
C7 A7 Dm7 G7 C7 C7

It's a comp pattern. stum rest strum hold or whatever for each bar - Jazzy

I'm not too knowledgeable about theory and I can't change the progression so don't deviate from it plz.
The A7 is throwing me off because it's supposed to be vi but it's VI so it's a major and I don't know how to fit that into the solo without doing some A major stuff for 4 short measures.

My teacher was teaching me that for blues, some scales I can use are pent, mixo, and blues and depending on the rhythm, I could use major and minor. I can also do these over each of the chords separately.

I don't know anything about jazz scales, I wish I did.

anyway, can you help me, I don't know what to do to make it sound good

It's not major, it's dominant. 1 3 5 b7. So A C E G.

You can use major or minor pentatonics there. Or full major/minor with some chromatics and blue notes here and there.

EDIT: The tricky part is the ii-V-I in there.
Last edited by imgooley at Sep 20, 2008,
#7
A7 is the secondary dominant to Dm7. That means that little bit of the harmony,
A7 - Dm7, is acting like a V7 - i7. That in turn means the Dm7 is getting a stronger
emphasis.

This little bit of the song you should consider a brief excursion into the key of Dm.
The A7 provides the leading tone to Dm which is C#. C# is your important
EMPHASIS note over the A7 -- it's both the 3 of A7 and leading tone to Dm.
Scale ideas over the A7 would be D harmonic or melodic minor.
#8
^+1.

In jazz, a common progression is a I - vi - ii - V. Also, any minor chord in the key is subject to change to dominant, usually to function as a secondary dominant. That is why the vi chord is the way it is in your progression.
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#9
Why not just work with an arpeggio, like play your blues or mixo over the normal parts of the progression, and then when the A7 comes up, slide into an A dominant arpeggio, then slide up to your Dm7 arpeggio (or just minor pentatonic at that point), and then bam, back into your first position C mixolydian or major or blues scale, etc.

ex:


A7                       Dm7             C7
--------------------------------------------------
--------------------------------------------------------
-------------------------------------------------------
------------5-7-5-7---/12-10---------------------8-8-
------4--7--------------------12-11-10---10\8--------
---/5-------------------------------------------



of course you won't have worked out the proper scale in your head (something that you'll want to be able to do), but you won't be all confused when you're trying to remember what you were going to play at that point.
#10
Quote by imgooley
It's not major, it's dominant. 1 3 5 b7. So A C E G.

You can use major or minor pentatonics there. Or full major/minor with some chromatics and blue notes here and there.

EDIT: The tricky part is the ii-V-I in there.
Lulwut.. A7 would be A C# E G.

In any case, a C Blues scale over the entire thing, A7 included, will sound fine. If you want to throw something in, maybe play an A half-whole diminished scale(root on A, made of alternating half and whole steps, hence the name) over the A7. As has been mentioned, the A7 is an A7 rather than, say, an Am7 because of the resolution to the Dm7. Play A7 Dm7 and then Am7 Dm7 and the former has a stronger pull.
Last edited by grampastumpy at Sep 20, 2008,