#1
I need some songs to improve my speed and technique. any suggestions?

any thing like rock, metal or indie will do. thanks
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#3
Yes tell us what kind of fast stuff you can play at the minute, or any song/lick/solo for that matter
#4
the main riff of plug in baby by muse
learn to play it the moderate pace of the song, then see how fast you can play it
its a fun little riff that does wonders for your speed and is a great warm up
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#5
any dragonforce really
once u've lernt a song by em u will almost definetly be fast
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#6
errr it depends how fast but im gonna say , dream theater and megadeth oh and make your own because that works REALLY well
#7
well i can play plug in baby and my playing ability is about intermediate but i want to know i can play the instrument well so im more confident
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#8
For improving legato, Iron Maiden is one of the best bands, because Dave has amazing legato fluidity.
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#9
Maiden has some good techniques, slides, bends and all that stuff. Iron Maiden is basically a very good band when looking at improving your speed, timing and techniques.
Why? Maiden has often slow intros and then go like fast and in the slow and fast parts use a lot of technique. Their songs are often in like three to five diffrent tempos.
There is also the Masterpiece known as the Trooper which is good for Fast Playing.


Then there is always Power metal to look at, that is basically fast most of the time. Center of the Universe by Kamelot should be good practice for speed at least.
Also Dragonforce is very, very fast. So that is how you can gain speed practice slow and then always increase tempo and always push your limit.


I say you at least check out Maiden songs and Kamelot.

Also there is Sonata Arctica, power metal which is really good, fast and melodic.
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#10
Quote by Conca
I need some songs to improve my speed and technique. any suggestions?

any thing like rock, metal or indie will do. thanks

It doesn't matter what you play, it's how you practice. Learning a "harder" song doesn't automatically make you improve more than learning something easier. You're approaching this all wrong, this isn't a competition - you shouldn't be worrying about how fast you are or how quickly you can improve, you should be learning guitar because you enjoy playing music.

All you should be worried about is playing cleanly, accurately, in time and articulating your notes. Approach every song you learn with that in mind and you'll get faster. There must be loads of songs you love and want to learn to play, don't discount them because you think they're too easy - that's just about the worst mistake a guitarist can make. Everything new you learn, no matter how simple, has something new to teach you and will help you improve. The purely physical aspects of your playing are to a certain degree on a fixed timescale, those attributes will develop gradually over time and there's little you can do to speed up the process so it's far better to simply learn as much as possible within your ability level and as things become easier to learn and play begin to look for things that are a bit more challenging.

If for argument's sake you spend a month learning one particularly hard song then you've achieved very little - all you've learned is one song. If you wait and tackle it at the right time it could only take you a day to learn. Taking that into account is far more important early on, you can waste inordinate amounts of valuable development time if you just gloss over the more fundamental aspects of playing in an effort to race ahead to the stuff you think is more interesting. To do the more interesting stuff properly you need to have a strong foundation and that means a comprehensive knowledge of the basics, not to mention be competent technically. If you try to rush too far ahead it eventually all falls apart and you find yourself having to go back to the beginning anyway - and it's a lot harder to re-learn things than it is to do them correctly in the first place.

This is all going to take time, possibly a long time...the sooner you accept that the happier you'll be.
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Last edited by steven seagull at Sep 20, 2008,
#11
Quote by steven seagull
It doesn't matter what you play, it's how you practice. Learning a "harder" song doesn't automatically make you improve more than learning something easier. You're approaching this all wrong, this isn't a competition - you shouldn't be worrying about how fast you are or how quickly you can improve, you should be learning guitar because you enjoy playing music.

All you should be worried about is playing cleanly, accurately, in time and articulating your notes. Approach every song you learn with that in mind and you'll get faster. There must be loads of songs you love and want to learn to play, don't discount them because you think they're too easy - that's just about the worst mistake a guitarist can make. Everything new you learn, no matter how simple, has something new to teach you and will help you improve. The purely physical aspects of your playing are to a certain degree on a fixed timescale, those attributes will develop gradually over time and there's little you can do to speed up the process so it's far better to simply learn as much as possible within your ability level and as things become easier to learn and play begin to look for things that are a bit more challenging.

If for argument's sake you spend a month learning one particularly hard song then you've achieved very little - all you've learned is one song. If you wait and tackle it at the right time it could only take you a day to learn. Taking that into account is far more important early on, you can waste inordinate amounts of valuable development time if you just gloss over the more fundamental aspects of playing in an effort to race ahead to the stuff you think is more interesting. To do the more interesting stuff properly you need to have a strong foundation and that means a comprehensive knowledge of the basics, not to mention be competent technically. If you try to rush too far ahead it eventually all falls apart and you find yourself having to go back to the beginning anyway - and it's a lot harder to re-learn things than it is to do them correctly in the first place.

This is all going to take time, possibly a long time...the sooner you accept that the happier you'll be.


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#15
+100000 to what steven seagull said

btw, learning a song won't make you fast.

speed is the byproduct of accuracy. if you're not accurate you'll sound like crap. then if you play fast and not accurate all you're accomplishing is sounding like fast crap. the more comfortable you are with your instrument the easier it is to play quicker.
#16
Quote by z4twenny
+100000 to what steven seagull said

btw, learning a song won't make you fast.

speed is the byproduct of accuracy. if you're not accurate you'll sound like crap. then if you play fast and not accurate all you're accomplishing is sounding like fast crap. the more comfortable you are with your instrument the easier it is to play quicker.

it's like anything, you get better by doing it...take driving for instance, you pass your test and then you learn to drive. You don't have to constantly drive faster and look for more complicated roads to improve, it happens naturally - your awareness improves, your instincts and anticipation improve, your ability to control the car and react to things improves.

If you're a new driver and you try to go round a race track you'll wipe out, however if you've been driving a couple of years chances are you could take a car round a track safely without ever having done it before. Guitar is no different, it's just the consequences are a bit less drastic.
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#17
+10.0^20 to what the Seagull said.

This is not to say that learning challenging songs isn't highly beneficial. But it's more of an overall technique boost, rather than "if I learn to play this fast song, then I'll be able to play faster". The speed comes up gradually. The boost is more from the fact that you aren't calling the shots about what you are playing - ie. you can't just settle into your old comfortable stuff, you are learning what a different guitarist is playing who has different strengths and getting better at those.

The important thing is to pick something that is a challenge, but that with work you can play it really well and have it sound really good. It needs to be just a bit of a stretch for where you are now. For example, if a guitarist who can play ACDC stuff well attempts No Boundaries, the result will just be a ton of frustration, and at the very best a really crappy rendition of NB. You have to bring it up in stages and whatever you play, you have to really focus on playing it well.
#18
Quote by padgea7x
any dragonforce really
once u've lernt a song by em u will almost definetly be fast

and sloppy

and if you play df long enough you might destroy any musical creativity left inside you!
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#19
Quote by kayman121
and sloppy

and if you play df long enough you might destroy any musical creativity left inside you!

nice one
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#20
What I do is I have a more challenging song/solo that I can play but not at the right tempo or clean enough. Once I have learned that, I play it once a day through and then go learn some easier more enjoyable songs. Eventually I know that songs and a whole bunch more.