#1
I can't seem to find a solution for this..

I'm recording electric guitar and vocals at the same time (multitrack), so obviously the guitar and the mic are close to each other since i'm using both at the same time.
The problem is that when I record vocals, I can hear the electric guitar strings in the recording because of the mic.. when I only wanna record the guitar via the line in.

Any solution for this problem?
"Technique doesn't come into it. I deal in emotions."
#2
Well sir,

The only solution here is to record the tracks separately.

Sadly there's no such things as a magic no-more-string-noise machine.

Bummer
This water's dark and coldGod's not where you hopedThis moment come and goneIt's time we all moved on
#3
Quote by Shredder XXX
Well sir,

The only solution here is to record the tracks separately.

Sadly there's no such things as a magic no-more-string-noise machine.

Bummer


Well thanks for that, and good work with the sarcasm lol
"Technique doesn't come into it. I deal in emotions."
#4
A couple of thoughts here....

If you want to throw money at the problem, look for either a very directional (word is 'hypercardiod') mic that rejects nearly all off-axis sound, or look for a figure-8 mic.

If you go with a figure-8 mic, you'll angle the mic such that the diaphragm will face the vocal and the null of the mic will point at the guitar. The null will, by definition, reject the sound of the guitar strings. it will be more expensive though.

Either way... neither is a perfect solution. You'll always get bleed.... it's just a question of how much, and how you deal with it.

If there is very little, it is easy to deal with. Once you have the mix happening, the power of the vocal will dominate your string noise on the one track, and what is left will get masked quite effectively by the actual guitar sound in the other track.

If there is too much to deal with, then you need to find a mic or mics with better rejection, change mic positioning to achieve better rejection, or find another way of dealing with it. You might be up against having to do the two tracks separately if you really can't deal with it.

Even if you are recording an acoustic and vocal at the same time, the techniques are the same. Obviously, you will get more string noise through the vocal mic with an acoustic guitar. The trick when doing that is minimizing the bleed, and then working with it in the mix from there. It might require experimenting with mic placement to avoid phasing issues.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#6
That would be a fluke if it worked.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#8
No you don't. People record people singing and playing all the time.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#9
Thanks for the help guys.
What exactly is "inverting the phase of the vocal track" though?
"Technique doesn't come into it. I deal in emotions."
#10
You know how when you listen to music, the speakers go in and out? They do so because of the electrical impulses (positive and negative) that make them vibrate. Inverting the phase makes all the positives negative, and all the negatives positive. The speakers go in when they used to go out, etc. The end result to your ears is no difference.

However, if you have two tracks that are out of phase, one signal is telling the speaker to move out and the other signal is telling the speaker to move in. The end result of that confusion is a very dead sound. In fact, two identical tracks, perfectly out of phase, will cancel each other out to total silence. This never happens in real world applications, but to prevent the two tracks from competing for this space, you can either invert the phase (described above, though it often creates new problems), or move one track or the other ahead or back in time by a very short duration... even a millisecond or two can make a huge difference.

The odds of inverting the phase of the vocal track helping in your situation I would say are slim to none. The signals between the clean dry sound of the unamplified electric guitar strings being picked up by the vocal mic and those created by the direct recording will be SO dissimilar -in both time and timbre - that the presence of phasing is practically nil.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.