#2
Quote by Nick Layton
Hi all---just wanted to make sure you've all seen my new article here at Ultimate Guitar.
Let me know if you have any questions or thoughts.
Cheers!
Nick
http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/columns/general_music/improving_your_phrasing_part_1.html


Great article !

here are a couple of points that I think are important:

the raising of the voice as in anger as you describe is related to dynamics, which can enhance a phrase, but on its own does not constitute phrasing. Alot of people get that confused when its described that way. I think its important to know what a phrase is 1st...... then know what kinds of things can embellish/enhance a phrase.

For some reason every article I've seen on the subject (including yours) leaves out one of the most important aspects....... explaining what a phrase actually is.... in musical terms. I would suggest that you describe it in terms of form, by explaining that it can be measured by how long it lasts (in bars/measures)....and possibly give some examples of different types of phrases.
At a bare minimum, a person should be able to listen to a song and clearly hear how long each phrase lasts.


Ultimately phrasing is about playing phrases. Things like dynamics, style, and note choice can enhance a phrase, but at its core its definable as a musical idea that lasts for a measurable amount of time. I think this core concept needs to be clear in any article about phrasing.


I like how you made the connection to speech. That is a good way to get the general idea across in non-musical terms.


your explanation about the fact that horn players need to take a break to breath helps them naturally develop phrasing is a very good point. I would just add that in my opinion one of the biggest reasons for the lack of phrasing by many guitarists has alot to do with the idea they've been fed that says " I must play fast to be taken seriously". What happens is that right from the start many players are focusing less on music, and more on ways to "get fast" or "get good". Most horn players I know develop their chops by playing music, whereas many guitarists I know develop their chops through exercises that are devoid of phrasing. They're working their fingers but not their ears/minds. I consider that to be one of the biggest issues regarding phrasing and guitarists.

Anyway, I know you put alot of work into that, and really it was quite good. There were just a few key points missing, that I feel are important. The music on your web page sounds cool btw.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Sep 21, 2008,
#4
Very interesting stuff, when can we expect article two?
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Theory is descriptive, not prescriptive.


Quote by MiKe Hendryckz
theory states 1+1=2 sometimes in music 1+1=3.
#6
I'm looking forward to it.
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Theory is descriptive, not prescriptive.


Quote by MiKe Hendryckz
theory states 1+1=2 sometimes in music 1+1=3.
#7
Diggin the article man. I'm a habitual "noodler" when it comes to my improvising. I'm gonna totally work on it now and slowww it down.

The tortoise beats the hare.
#8
Here is a mystery then:
In common with other "mainstream" instrumentalists, classical guitarists put a lot of time and attention into the detail of phrasing, They too, as with the horn players you mention, are aware of phrasing from the beginning of their training. Yet in my experience most (or many) of the classically trained (and I'm one) find improvisation difficult to pull off well.
I suppose it illustrates that phrasing is only one part of the skill set required for good improvisation.
Last edited by R.Christie at Sep 21, 2008,
#10
Quote by R.Christie
I suppose it illustrates that phrasing is only one part of the skill set required for good improvisation.

+1
There is no single technique/way of thinking that will make you a good musician.
#12
I tell alot of guys to copy a singers phrasing when they start of. Perhaps you should include that in your next article? This is actually how early blues guys used to improvise, they would try to get as close to the sound of a singers voice (in this case, they would copy their call and response working songs).

Otherwise, a very good article. Definantly one of the better phrasing articles.
#14
Quote by Nick Layton
I have a lot of call and response stuff in one of my Phrasing ebooks. But yeah, an article on the topic is a good idea too...thanks.
Can you send a link? Or do I have to pay?
#18
Quote by Nick Layton
Actually, that's my property bro. I'd appreciate it if you didn't post without permission.
Thx
Easy fix