#1
For the time I've been playing I've never tried to learn any scales (which btw I know is an epic failure) because I never understood what they actually were. I used to thing they were types of arpeggios but I realized that it wasn't.

A)Define what a scale is

b)Which ones to learn first (Metal is my main genre)
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#2
A) A group of notes which can be used in a certain key of a song.

B) Start with Minor Pentatonic and then move onto natural minor. THen move onto things lke melodic and harmonic minors later on.
#4
Quote by face_the_fear
A) A group of notes which can be used in a certain key of a song.

B) Start with Minor Pentatonic and then move onto natural minor. THen move onto things lke melodic and harmonic minors later on.


You know, major scales are good too....
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#5
My guitar stays in Drop D tuning. Will this pose as a erm...problem?
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Currently using:
B.C. Rich NJ Deluxe Jr. V
B.C. Rich Revenge Warlock
Bugera 6262 212 120 Watt amp :

Coming soon:
B.C. Rich Pro X Mockingbird Hardtail
#6
lol yea I know but he said he played mainly metal. I hardly ever use major scales and I play alot of metal too
#8
Quote by TheBodomBullet
My guitar stays in Drop D tuning. Will this pose as a erm...problem?



WHen you have figured out what a scale pattern is, (You will most probably use a tab for this) you will have to move your dropped string notes up two frets. I hope that makes sense because I cant really explain it any other way.
#9
Quote by face_the_fear
WHen you have figured out what a scale pattern is, (You will most probably use a tab for this) you will have to move your dropped string notes up two frets. I hope that makes sense because I cant really explain it any other way.


Nah I know. Because scales are in standard tuning I guess? Or at least displayed in standard tuning?
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Currently using:
B.C. Rich NJ Deluxe Jr. V
B.C. Rich Revenge Warlock
Bugera 6262 212 120 Watt amp :

Coming soon:
B.C. Rich Pro X Mockingbird Hardtail
#11
Quote by TheBodomBullet
My guitar stays in Drop D tuning. Will this pose as a erm...problem?

No, scales are scales - they're a musical concept independent of any instrument. A scale is a group of notes that follow a set pattern if intervals over a single octave, those intervals give a scale a particular sound. They're not "displayed" in any tuning, they're just a bunch of notes. They've technically got nothing to do with patterns on the fretboard, the patterns are just where a scale happens to appear - I'm assuming you want to know what it is that you're actually looking for before you go any further with them.

A scale is actually written in terms of the notes and intervals it contains, the formula for the major scale for instance is WWHWWWH where W is a whole step, or two semitones which happens to coincide with 2 frets on the guitar and H is a half step, or one semitone which is one fret on the guitar. Remember these are musical steps, they relate to the difference between pitches, they're nothing to do with the physical position of things on the guitar.

If you start with your root note and follow that interval pattern you have a major scale, so if C is your root note and you follow that pattern you get C D E F G A B which is the C major scale. Anywhere those notes appear on the fretboard is the C major scale and that's how you construct scale patterns, you just find all the instances of those notes wherever they may be on the guitar.

To learn scales you first need to learn the notes on your fretboard, you're not going to be able to get anywhere without that bit of basic knowledge. Secondly you need to learn a bit about intervals which are the building blocks of scales and then you need to start with the major scale which is the cornerstone of all western music theory...everything refers back to it and without it you can't learn anything else. Best place to start is probably Josh Urban's Crusade articles in the columns section - they lay everything out clearly, they're easy to read and they also give you a good framework to build your learning from.
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Last edited by steven seagull at Sep 22, 2008,
#13
Does anybody know of a helpfull guide to learning the notes on the fretboard cos it's taking me ages to do this, i keep forgetting, plus im put off by the hard work! lol
#14
1 - learn the open strings...E, A, D, G, B, E
2 - familiarise yourself with the pattern of notes along the low E string, you don't even need to learn it by heart yet, just have it for reference.

E F F# G G# A Bb B C D Eb

3 - realise that the 12 fret is the octave of the open string, and therefore the same note.
4 - realise that the pattern of intervals is constant, so 12 th fret onwards is identical to open string onwards.

... as far as working out notes goes you are currently never more than 6 frets away from a reference note. However, counting along 6 frets is kind of clunky and not particularly easy, but it's a start.

5 - learn the notes that correspond to the next open string, so 5th fret on the E, A, D and B strings, 4th fret on the G

...all of a sudden you're never more than 3 frets way from a known reference note. All of a sudden working out the notes you don't know became a lot easier...almost twice as easy, in fact.

6 - locate the other octaves of the open notes, first the ones on the next string... 7th fret on the A, D, G and high E strings, 8th fret on the B string. Then the octaves two strings away so 2nd fret on the D and G strings, 3rd fret on the B and top E.

7 - in the same way, locate the octaves of the notes you learned in step 5

...all of a sudden you're now never more than 1 fret away from a known reference note, which basically means you know them all!
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#16
Quote by ealtdharkon
Easy peasy: learn the major scale, and the minor pentatonic.

Then come back to UG, and ask someone what modes are.


Modes are insane.