#1
If I were to be playing a song with a capo on the second fret, what key would the song be in? And should my harmonica be in the same key?
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#2
You would be in the key of F#/Gb. Your harmonica doesn't necessarily need to be tuned to that exact key because I believe that some of the notes in the key of F# are most likely the same notes on your harmonica. Then again, I don't use Harmonicas. So basically, my answer would be yes, use a Harmonica Tuned to F#/Gb
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#3
it could be in any key
but if you moved the chords/part up two frets the key is up a whole step

and yes you should play the harmonica in the new key
#4
If you're playing open, it's likely to be in A major / F# minor or D major / B minor, those are the G major and C major shapes, others could be E major / C# minor, D major shape. It could, however be in any key. A major/D major would be most likely, though.
rawr
#5
That doesn't tell you anything about the key, it allows you to easily transpose songs from 1 key to another. The key is determined by what chords are used, and yes you would use a harmonica that matches the key of the song.
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#6
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If you're playing open, it's likely to be in A major / F# minor or D major / B minor, those are the G major and C major shapes, others could be E major / C# minor, D major shape. It could, however be in any key. A major/D major would be most likely, though.


How exactly did you figure that one out?

Now as for the question. Lets say you didnt have a capo on and were playing in the key of E. If you put the capo on and used the same chords (now up 2 frets) it would be in the key of F#. Another example: if you were playing with no capo in the key of Bb, then you put the capo on the 2nd fret, you would be in the key of C with the same chords.

As for the harmonica, it would be best to have one in the key of the song. I know my brother has a set of 7 or 8 so it covers the main keys anyways. Keep in mind I dont know much about harmonicas though, but thats the easier way.
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#7
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How exactly did you figure that one out?

Now as for the question. Lets say you didnt have a capo on and were playing in the key of E. If you put the capo on and used the same chords (now up 2 frets) it would be in the key of F#. Another example: if you were playing with no capo in the key of Bb, then you put the capo on the 2nd fret, you would be in the key of C with the same chords.

As for the harmonica, it would be best to have one in the key of the song. I know my brother has a set of 7 or 8 so it covers the main keys anyways. Keep in mind I dont know much about harmonicas though, but thats the easier way.


Capo's are usually used for using open string chords higher up, Those keys have many open strings in it.. it just sort of makes sense, quite a lot of songs dealing with open chords are in G or C major. There are, obviously, other keys, but they are less common.
rawr
#8
For the harmonica, it is common to choose the key that allows you play 'cross-harp' (it's basically the mixolydian mode). To find which harmonica to use for cross harp, count up four notes in the key of your chords.

If your chords are E A B, this is the key of E major. Count up four notes in the key - E F# G# A - and you find that an A harmonica will allow you to play cross-harp.
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#9
Depends how good you are at harmonica.

If your an absolute beginner (or you just suck like me) use the same harmonica as the key of the song. Also, play around the first octave and the lower notes of the second octave, its easier to play these notes than the third octave.

If you can do all those wonderfull bends, than the harmonica thats a perfect fourth up is more appropriate, as you can hit more of the essential notes from that key than from the key the harp was designed for. Like the leading tone, probably the second most important note of any key (second hole, draw bend). If your harp is in G, than play over progressions in D.
Using your harp this way also enables the use of #2's (enharmonic m3), b5's and b7's. All VERY important notes in major based blues.

But if you can do bends, overblows, overdraws, overblow bends and overdraw bends (this is what all modern harp players should strive for) you would be playing 5 or 6 notes per hole and be able to play the full chromatic scale (all twelve notes). People who can do this generally play whichever harp feels comfortable.
Last edited by demonofthenight at Sep 22, 2008,
#10
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If you can do all those wonderfull bends, than the harmonica thats a perfect fourth up is more appropriate
Fixed?
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Quote by MudMartin
Only looking at music as math and theory, is like only looking at the love of your life as flesh and bone.

Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
Counting bodies like sheep to the rhythm of the war drums
#11
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Fixed?
Hey thanks. Yeah, fixed. Silly me. If your songs in G play a C harp. Editing my now...