#1
I was wonder what music/guitar schools are you guys going to after High School?

I was thinking about going to Humber College for atlease 1 years and then go to Berklee for a few years.


If you have any good recommendations from schools don't be afraid to put it down because you never know if the person you are helping is going to be in your band.
#2
I'm *at* UGA. As a music performance major. Yep.

Not for guitar, though. I'm in for bassoon.
Fair warning: LOTS of people audition for guitar. It's ridiculously competitive. Also, if you can't play fingerstyle you can forget the whole shebang, most universities that I can think of with a guitar program have at least 1 fingerstyle etude on the audition.
That said, good luck getting into Berklee! Where is Humber?
Last edited by Nightfyre at Sep 21, 2008,
#3
Quote by Nightfyre
I'm *at* UGA. As a music perfromance major. Yep.

Not for guitar, though. I'm in for bassoon.
Fair warning: LOTS of people audition for guitar. It's ridiculously competitive. Also, if you can't play fingerstyle you can forget the whole shebang, most universities that I can think of with a guitar program have at least 1 fingerstyle etude on the audition.
That said, good luck getting into Berklee! Where is Humber?


Toronto, Canada.


I'm working my ass of right now for Berklee. Thank god, I'm only in grade 11 so, I have time to get some hard training done.
#4
im gonna go to McNally smith college of music in minnesota. im going to major in recording and minor in performance. majoring in recording is a little more rock solid than trying to make it big performing. i know the head of the guitar department really well since i went to a guitar program there for a week. he wants me to lead the class for reading sheet music next year for that same program
Quote by Mo Jiggity
What he said. You are a wise man for not buying into the hype.

ya hear that...he thinks im wise
#5
People.. well, teens this is going to be important if you are looking to become a composer, musician, or anything to be with music. This thread will help you out in YOUR future as a musician. You better be asking questions or asking from advice for people that are in a music College or University.
#6
I live a couple towns over from Boston Massachusetts, so i hope to attend Berklee College of Music in Boston, but who knows. I hear its a great school.
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#7
Im already in Conestoga College, in Kitchener, Ontario, Canada. Not for music though, electrical engineering.
#9
Quote by Ghold125
should i be working on my sheet reading skills then...?



It would help a tons.
#10
I hope to get into Shenandoah university in Virginia next year, major in music recording and minor in performance, then take a post grad for performance in england.

And yes, sight reading is important. It is even required for audition at shenandoah.

Those of you who want to look at electric guitar, really your only choice is jazz studies. Classical guitar will help your playing a lot and is offered at most colleges, but you are forced into playing acoustic, fingerstyle.
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#11
Quote by Ghold125
should i be working on my sheet reading skills then...?


yes. thats one of the biggest factors in music college. i have talked to the guy that leads the guitar department at berklee and the guy at mcnally smith and they said all music colleges require knowing how to read sheet music.
Quote by Mo Jiggity
What he said. You are a wise man for not buying into the hype.

ya hear that...he thinks im wise
#12
I plan to go to Cedarville University for Music Recording and Composition. I'm also minoring in Pastoral Studies and Music Teaching.
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#13
ok, good thing i was in band for 5 years, sight reading is easy. Now all i have to do is learn where all the notes are X)
...
#14
I don't plan on going to school for guitar, but I do plan on majoring in music theory. I may audition for a guitar class, but as said before if you can't play finger style forget it, tons of people try for guitar.

But I'm thinking about Kenyon or maybe Baldwin Wallace. Both somewhat close to home (Kenyon is like 15 minutes, Baldwin Wallace is about 2 hours)
#15
I go to virginia commonwealth university and I am a jazz studies performance major. You do not really need prior classical playing if you are going into a jazz program however once you get in you will probably have to take classical lessons on top of the jazz. Yes reading is important but I would also heavily focus on your ear training.
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#18
I was going to go to berklee, but I decided against it. Now it is either USC, or SDSU
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#19
Do you guys think it's worth it to major in music? The music business is such a fickle thing, where alot of the time, skills don't mean much, contacts do. I would love to study music, but I'm just wondering if thats the smartest thing to do, whereas you can major in something more.... guaranteed and then take music classes on the side.

Just trying to make up my mind….
#20
I thought about doing some music papers along with my economics degree at University of Queensland next year, but then decided that it wasn't worth all the extra work so I'll just do a few cruisy ones like Music Appreciation or the like.
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#21
Quote by Bigwoof
Do you guys think it's worth it to major in music? The music business is such a fickle thing, where alot of the time, skills don't mean much, contacts do. I would love to study music, but I'm just wondering if thats the smartest thing to do, whereas you can major in something more.... guaranteed and then take music classes on the side.

Just trying to make up my mind….


Well, it's just one of them things. What you say is at least partially-true, but ultimately, if doing Music is hat you really want to do, then studying it at the highest level can only be a good thing, right? Sure it's a risk, but then so is everything. I could really do without another 3 years of being a completely skint student wanker, the debt, and the risk of it amounting to nothing. But then, I'd f*cking kick myself if in five years time, if I didn't take my music studies to the next level, and I'm still nowhere nearer to being a professional musician, without any prospects of being one.

Don't forget, University is where many personal and industry contacts are forged. So I'll not only walk out with a degree, but a full body of work, and contacts with a plethora of other musicians, and more importantly, contacts within the industry. To make my degree have less chance of being a waste of time, I'm going to do a year of teacher training afterwards. There's always work for qualified teachers, and since my country is currently crying out for teachers, learner support (grants etc) is great for people studying to become teachers. Not that it can ever be an entire waste of time anyway, even if I don't do the teacher training. Post-graduates earn more on average than those without degrees, regardless if their line of work is anything to do with their degree or not. People with degrees are just more employable (any degree is an impressive thing on a CV for any employer), and generally command higher earnings than those without.

Ultimately, success depends on a person's drive to succeed. When I started my college course (finished in June) two years ago, I was crap at guitar, and didn't know any theory. Like anyone who just plays guitar in there bedroom, knows the minor pentatonic, and has only been exposed to some of their guitar-playing friends who only strum a few chords- I thought I was the sh*t. So, it was a shock when I was suddenly found myself in the company of many great musicians (teachers, and other students), and I realised that I was crap. I had literally jumped in at the deep end, and very nearly left in the first few months, because I just couldn't keep up with everyone else. My playing, and especially my theory (I didn't know any) where just far too poor.

But, I decided to persevere. I tried really hard, and used all my free time studying music theory, and actually concentrating on my playing skills (scales, speed, accuracy), rather than just learning random tunes that I like. At the end of two years, I had gone from one of the worst students, to one of the top 5, and past my course with the highest grade attainable- Triple Distinction (you need 80 UCAS points to get DDD, I got 105..). It was because I had plunged myself into this environment, being surrounded by such highly talented musicians, that I myself realised how sh*t I was, and started to study music properly, and became a much better musician in my own right. From one of the worst in the class, to one of the best, in two years. Purely through really applying myself, rather than just doing the bare minimum. Meanwhile, others on the course, which were initially way better than me, didn't try very hard, and didn't really make any progress and/or get any better at all. They still passed, but they'll never get anywhere. This experience was invaluable, and I know I have to approach University with the same attitude.

Ultimately, yes, there is a percentage of people who do walk out of Uni and end up not getting anywhere with their degree, etc. But, by and large, these tend to be the sort of people who only went to Uni to bum around being a student for another three years, and erked their way through their entire course, doing the bare-minimum amount of work in order to pass all the modules, not taking part in any extra-curricular, not getting involved with University functions, and generally not applying themselves in any way that they don't have to. I'm going to be performing in a covers band, composing and recording material for use in a wide variety of media, leasing with the game-development students in order to provide soundtracks for their projects, likewise leasing with the film making students, the art students, contacting local businesses, etc.

I'll be doing anything and everything in order to get my name out there, and do as much music work as possible while I'm studying. So I won't just walk out with a mere degree, I'll walk out at the end of it with a whole tone of experience, contacts, etc. I'm not just going to do all my homework on the last night before it's due, and merely "pass" every module. I'm going to ace every module, and pass my course "with Honours". I aim to be at the top of my class again. That's the difference between people who succeed, and people who just spend their entire degree hanging out in their shared-accommodation, smoking weed with their mates, partying every night, and not doing any work.

If you don't want to go to University, then you probably shouldn't. If you wan to go, but are worried about it amounting to nothing- don't worry. You will succeed if you have the drive to succeed. Just going to lectures and handing in coursework is not a recipe for success. You need to apply yourself in many different ways, getting involved in lots of University events (like doing gigs at the Student Union etc), and even doing some professional work before you leave Uni. If you can only put "Music Degree" on your CV, that doesn't say nearly as much as "Music Degree, 20 industry contacts, extensive portfolio of professional work, involvement in musical stage productions, gigs, etc".

If you just cruise through your course doing the bare minimum, then you probably are just wasting your time. If you want to succeed, then you do everything you need to do to make sure you succeed. Let us take three hypothetical people- persons X, Y, and Z. X has a relevant degree in music, and many industry contacts. Y has no degree, but many industry contacts, and Z has a degree, but no industry contacts. Assuming all else is equal, person X will get the job, every time. You need to make sure that you're going to be person X, and that ultimately involves lots and lots of very hard (but rewarding) work, and having an actual game plan, rather than just leisurely going about your studies, making no preparations for when you leave.

Because of my studies at college, I know that studying music at University (the highest level of academia, pretty much) will hone my skills so much, and provide me with great employment prospects if I really apply myself. It really is one of those things that you get out of it what you put in. Also, you must realise that there are many different avenues of the music profession. It's not all "being on stage playing guitar". In fact, that stuff is just a tiny fraction of the industry. For every one guy on stage, there's probably literally a million guys and gals in other areas of the music industry. I know I'd rather be a music teacher (for example) whilst trying to make it big with my band, than working at McDonalds whilst trying to make it big with my band. Having that degree means that you can find employment in some area of the industry, and even if it's not the holy grail (being in a multi-platinum selling band), it's almost certainly a lot better than what you'd otherwise be doing.

There's lots of horror stories about post-graduates not amounting to anything, but I think they're very exaggerated (also take into account what I said before, about it just being the lazy students who never get anywhere anyway). Out of all the people I know in my life, all the highest-earners are all in highly-skilled professions, and they all studied at University. There's literally only one post-graduate I know who passed his course more than five years ago who isn't earning a good wage, and he's just a bum. Out of all the non degree-holders I know, very few of them are as financially well-off as the post-graduates I know.

P.S. Sorry for the long winding post.
Last edited by Martin Scott at Sep 22, 2008,
#22
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#23
At first I thought of Berklee college, but I decided it's going to be a waste of my time majoring in music. So, it's John Jay/Columbia for me :p

I'd rather take music as an independent study/hobby. It's better to jam with friends than anything.

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#24
im thinking about it, but what do you actually learn from there?
how to play better? i dont like fingerstyle.
music theory? i could get a private tutor
contacts? i already have a few but more cant hurt..

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#25
Quote by metallicafan616
im thinking about it, but what do you actually learn from there?
how to play better? i dont like fingerstyle.
music theory? i could get a private tutor
contacts? i already have a few but more cant hurt..


An official piece of paper saying you know your shit?

Oh and Martin Scott, that wall has the potential ability to convince my mother that I should go to school for music Like you said she's one of the people who think I'll end up a total bum if I go for music. But unfortunately she's not paying for my college (thanks dad!) so I'm going for music