#1
i hate always sounding a total noob on this forum but its the only way ill learn i guess anywho... what is the actual definition of Jazz and Blues guitar?
i play rock, metal, shred and classical but i want to learn jazz and blues so can anyone tell me exactly what the difference is between other styles and jazz and blues?
thank youuuu
xxx


killing is my business... and business is good
#2
...seriously?
Quote by dcdossett65
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Cares.
#3
BB King, really Defines blues for me, Smooth emphatic cleans, that roll easily from the heart, not the mind, gives a feeling of passion, emotion, blues for me is the best thing I can play to chill me out, throw on a backing track, and just close my eyes and play what I feel...metal is more so theory based scales, and louder, IMO, than it needs to be, Blues is where it started, along with jazz, the amazing simplicity of an ES335 through a Vox Ac30 wins for me over an ESP through 18 randall stacks and distortion pedals any day...

If you want to get into it

SRV, BB King, Eric Claptons Later Material, Albert King, Mark Knopfler, Dave Gilmour

These are some of the best IMO

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#4
Jazz and Blues isn't really about guitar.

Blues is more of a feeling than a type of music. The music is simply a medium of expression for the blues.

Jazz is has a similar type of feeling as blues, but is extrapolated as far as complexity and technical prowess.

For playing the prototypical blues, you need to know the 12 bar I IV V progression. For Jazz, you need to know how to apply as much classical theory as possible, and to do so while still hitting that blue and/or swinging feeling.

That's it in a nutshell.
#5
IMO, you cant have jazz without some horns. Jazz with guitar alone sucks.
Quote by dcdossett65
Life is too short to worry about this crap.

Who.

Cares.
#6
Well, jazz and blues can be mistakenly thought to be the same style. Jazz, one of America's greatest (and only) original art forms, has no limits, per se. Tonally, it's quite different than blues. Listen to Howlin' Wolf (blues) and Fats Waller (jazz). Totally different. Blues limits itself to mainly the pentatonic and blues based chord progressions and solos. Jazz uses a variety of scales ranging from pentatonic to natural minor, jazz melodic minor, mixolydian, etc., etc. Jazz also uses alot of chord extensions and such and heavily layered chords, depending on which instrument you play. Jazz is more associated with improvisation than blues. Blues started out as having form, but jazz was purely improvised.

So, you can hear the difference between jazz and blues and other styles. Classical music has strict form with no room for improvisation. Metal and rock are amplified forms of blues with classical influence, depending on the style. That's really it, in a nutshell.
" When the power of love overcomes the love of power, the world will know peace."-Jimi Hendrix
#7
Quote by HLrocker
IMO, you cant have jazz without some horns. Jazz with guitar alone sucks.


+1

I love a good solid Blues band with a brass section a piano and backing singers...

Jazz, I'm not into so much, but Blues is a genre i'm really passionate about, like the guy above said, It's more a feeling than a guitar style

Gibson Buckethead Les Paul & Peter Frampton Les Paul
Dean Razorback Slime Bumblebee
Mesa Boogie Dual Rectifier
EHX Memory Man/Hazarai
Digitch Whammy
Sovtek Straight 4x12
Herdim Picks
Laney Linebacker 50 Reverb
MXR Phase 90
#8
ah cheers guys, so what scales would you recommend for blues? i know pentatonic and minor scales
xxx


killing is my business... and business is good
#9
i think there's a very simple blues scale...I Use it a whole lot, mixing it with pentatonic and phygrian (I know, odd)

Search for scale tabs and just play your heart out,

Gibson Buckethead Les Paul & Peter Frampton Les Paul
Dean Razorback Slime Bumblebee
Mesa Boogie Dual Rectifier
EHX Memory Man/Hazarai
Digitch Whammy
Sovtek Straight 4x12
Herdim Picks
Laney Linebacker 50 Reverb
MXR Phase 90
#10
Quote by kwidjibo1
ah cheers guys, so what scales would you recommend for blues? i know pentatonic and minor scales


Jazz melodic minor
Mixolydian
Dorian Scale
Chromatic scale
Diminished scale
major scale
whole tone
the list goes on...play them, mix them, have fun.
" When the power of love overcomes the love of power, the world will know peace."-Jimi Hendrix
#12
Quote by HLrocker
IMO, you cant have jazz without some horns. Jazz with guitar alone sucks.

So the Wes Montgomery Trio, Joe Pass, George Benson, and the Jim Hall Trio all suck?


Quote by Warheart1188
Well, jazz and blues can be mistakenly thought to be the same style. Jazz, one of America's greatest (and only) original art forms, has no limits, per se. Tonally, it's quite different than blues. Listen to Howlin' Wolf (blues) and Fats Waller (jazz). Totally different. Blues limits itself to mainly the pentatonic and blues based chord progressions and solos. Jazz uses a variety of scales ranging from pentatonic to natural minor, jazz melodic minor, mixolydian, etc., etc. Jazz also uses alot of chord extensions and such and heavily layered chords, depending on which instrument you play. Jazz is more associated with improvisation than blues. Blues started out as having form, but jazz was purely improvised.


That's a bad example. Canon by Charles Mingus reminds me a lot of Dark was the Night by Blind Willie Johnson.

Alternatively, listen to Art Blakey and the Jazz Messengers and then listen to Dr. John, or some New Orleans Blues, and you hear what I mean.

But that's not really what I'm saying. The message and milieus of the music are almost identical.

Furthermore, Blues is almost entirely improvisation, lead wise. Jazz still has structure based around chord progressions, as does blues. The main difference between the two in my eyes is the virtuosity of the musicians and the form the sometimes takes.
#13
Jazz is Blues' more complicated and demanding father, while blues is the soulsy rebellious son. I love blues because it is easy to play by feeling. Just know your pentatonic shapes really well, and know where you can bend for effect, also know what intervals sound good. It's easy from there.

Also, the best blues comes from the heart, on the spot.

I find proper jazz very hard to play, but that is because I've kinda ignored the fact that classical theory exists.
#14
Quote by ljohn
Jazz is Blues' more complicated and demanding father, while blues is the soulsy rebellious son. I love blues because it is easy to play by feeling. Just know your pentatonic shapes really well, and know where you can bend for effect, also know what intervals sound good. It's easy from there.

Also, the best blues comes from the heart, on the spot.

I find proper jazz very hard to play, but that is because I've kinda ignored the fact that classical theory exists.

Blues is Jazz's hardworking, simple, country, chicken-eating, shotgun firing daddy and Jazz is the educated son who embarked upon Europe and the Big City.
#16
Jazz and blues are differant genres. It is like asking "Define metal and southern rock". Blues is based on microtonality, while jazz is based on strict adherence to modes and scales. This is a generalisation of course.

Keep in mind there are differant subgenres to both genres. Jazz has model, swing, trad etc. Blues has delta, Chicago, British etc.
Last edited by slayer1516 at Sep 21, 2008,
#17
Quote by slayer1516
Jazz and blues are differant genres. It is like asking "Define metal and southern rock". Blues is based on microtonality, while jazz is based on strict adherence to modes and scales. This is a generalisation of course.

Jazz doesn't have a strict adherence to anything. The only reason why microtonal notes aren't used gratuitously in jazz is because of the limitations of the instruments.

Seriously, there is nothing free-er musically than jazz.
#18
Quote by imgooley
Jazz doesn't have a strict adherence to anything. The only reason why microtonal notes aren't used gratuitously in jazz is because of the limitations of the instruments.

Seriously, there is nothing free-er musically than jazz.


I assume the TS wants to play jazz guitar. Jazz guitar is very popular and respected in the jazz realm. Guitar happens to also be one of the most versatile insturments in the world, at least in terms of moving in between the notes of the chromatic scale. Jazz guitar, however, discourages bending, slide guitar etc., which are coming microtonal techniques in guitar, especially blues guitar.
#19
Quote by imgooley
So the Wes Montgomery Trio, Joe Pass, George Benson, and the Jim Hall Trio all suck?


yes.
Quote by dcdossett65
Life is too short to worry about this crap.

Who.

Cares.
#20
Quote by slayer1516
I assume the TS wants to play jazz guitar. Jazz guitar is very popular and respected in the jazz realm. Guitar happens to also be one of the most versatile insturments in the world, at least in terms of moving in between the notes of the chromatic scale. Jazz guitar, however, discourages bending, slide guitar etc., which are coming microtonal techniques in guitar, especially blues guitar.


You can do whatever the hell you want in jazz. Go listen to some fusion players.