#2
Functionally, there is no real "dominant" chord in locrian. You aren't going to be making a locrian progression anyway. If you insist on using that particular mode, do it over a one chord vamp. Even then, good luck establishing a tonal center. The closest you're going to get to a locrian sound without harmonically crippling your music (beyond what it takes with other modes) is to use a minor tonic chord to establish the tonal center, and a minor chord built off of the third degree to emphasize the diminished fifth.
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Last edited by Archeo Avis at Sep 21, 2008,
#4
Quote by Swap-Meet
Why can't i :/?


Modes, locrian in particular, do not utilize functional harmony. Modes in general are harmonically weak, but locrian has the dubious honor of being the only mode with a diminished, and therefore dissonant, tonic chord. Dissonance, by the way, does not mean unpleasant, but rather that the chord has a sense of movement and wants to resolve elsewhere. What this means that you are not establishing a tonal center that suggests locrian. Any attempt to do so will result in a resolution to the relative major (or, less likely, minor).

You shouldn't be worrying about modes, much less locrian, until you have a firm grasp on the theory behind the major scale and diatonic harmony.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#5
Would the dominant chord in F# Locrian still be D7 (as it is in G Ionian) or would it be C7?
The chord built off the fifth scale degree would be C (or Cmaj7). I guess this could be considered the Dominant in the same way that C is the mediant in A minor, while C#m is the mediant in A major.
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#6
Quote by Archeo Avis
Functionally, there is no real "dominant" chord in locrian. You aren't going to be making a locrian progression anyway. If you insist on using that particular mode, do it over a one chord vamp. Even then, good luck establishing a tonal center. The closest you're going to get to a locrian sound without harmonically crippling your music (beyond what it takes with other modes) is to use a minor tonic chord to establish the tonal center, and a minor chord built off of the third degree to emphasize the diminished fifth.
Tonal center? In my locrian mode? I dont think so. Locrian has a b5'th, which inverted is still a flat fifth. This means the tonal center is ambigious, just like in diminished chords. Actually, if you vamp F#mb5 your more likely to hear a resolution to the D note instead of the F# note, as the tritone with the root in the F#mb5 makes the chord sound like a rootless D9 chord.
Just a little advanced theory. Ignore the above text.


Why can't i :/?

It depends on how you use modes. If you use modes for chord progressions, than he's right. The thing about modal progressions is that you dont want them to resolve to the I chord of the parent scale, which in this case is Gmajor. But F#mb5 only really wants to move to Gmaj and will sound weird if you force it to move to anywhere else. This is because that chord contains the G major scales leading tone, F#, among other notes which like to move to notes from the Gmaj chord. Voice leading FTW.
#7
Tonal center? In my locrian mode? I dont think so. Locrian has a b5'th, which inverted is still a flat fifth. This means the tonal center is ambigious, just like in diminished chords. Actually, if you vamp F#mb5 your more likely to hear a resolution to the D note instead of the F# note, as the tritone with the root in the F#mb5 makes the chord sound like a rootless D9 chord.
Just a little advanced theory. Ignore the above text.


Just strumming a half diminished chord is likely to result in it resolving elsewhere, but having the bass arpeggiate the chord while focusing on the root is a different matter entirely, and is something I've done before with reasonable success. While you're not really going to establish a tonal center "with" locrian, it's entirely possible to establish one "compatible" with it.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
Last edited by Archeo Avis at Sep 22, 2008,
#8
Do a little reading on "Modal Interchange" and I believe you'll find a way of getting the sound you want while being able to establish a tonal center. Chances are you will be injecting the Locrian sound into a piece that has been established in another, more solid, foundation.
#9
D(7)
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