#1
Hello everyone.

I need to design a new practise routine as my old one is no longer showing results. My main area of influence are progressive bands like Porcupine Tree, Opeth, Tool, Radiohead, Incubus and other like that.

I know this is a very vague question but I was hoping someone could name some skills that are important in bands such as that.

As always, any thanks is appreciated.
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Theory is descriptive, not prescriptive.


Quote by MiKe Hendryckz
theory states 1+1=2 sometimes in music 1+1=3.
#2
dont know much porcupine tree but probably playing along with a metronome will help out alot, and some picking exercises while running scales all over the fretboard so you can play on the upper frets as well as the low ones, and dont make it very long, running this crap can really extenguish creativity.
#3
I recently realized that Creep is an excellent song.

Um... practice string skipping. It's really handy.
Corona Corona
#4
Quote by demoniacfashion
I recently realized that Creep is an excellent song.
Radiohead have many excellent songs

Quote by The_Sophist
I know this is a very vague question but I was hoping someone could name some skills that are important in bands such as that.
Learn lots and lots of their songs.

For Tool, techniques include: pinch harmonics, drop-tuning chords/powerchords, hammer-ons, pull-offs, volume swells, tremelo picking, pick scrapes, bending, vibrato, palm muting
My name is Andy
Quote by MudMartin
Only looking at music as math and theory, is like only looking at the love of your life as flesh and bone.

Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
Counting bodies like sheep to the rhythm of the war drums
#5
Go on the internet and fins practice routines from accomplished guitarists. A few i have seen/used sections of are Steve Vai, Jon Petrucci, Paul Gilbert. All focus on improving techniques all around, but if you just pick out the techniques you like in particular, like the ones mentioned by the dude above me, you will steadily improve.

Also if your not playing with a metronome your not gonna improve much
#7
I know all about chord construction, scales, timing and the like. I'm also fairly proficient in the most the techniques Aenimus suggested. I was thinking more along the lines of layering, harmony, advanced time signatures, things of that nature.
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Theory is descriptive, not prescriptive.


Quote by MiKe Hendryckz
theory states 1+1=2 sometimes in music 1+1=3.
#8
i know for tool more "advanced" time sigs and polyrhythms are a must. im still trying to wrap my head around polyrhythms (im working on them now) and it can either be easy or as difficult as you make it. i know tool employs a lot of countermelody and chord inversions here and there.
#9
Sounds like you're not looking for techniques to physically practice but theoretical stuff. Try tabbing some of your favorite songs, or ones that sound like things you want to play. Even if there are tabs for the songs already, it'll be best to figure out how to play the songs yourself, then try and figure out why the things work the way they do, and what exactly it is that makes the songs so appealing to your ear. You can't really have a practice routine for harmony aside from study.
Nor less I deem that there are Powers
Which of themselves our minds impress;
That we can feed this mind of ours
In a wise passiveness.
--Wordsworth

last.fm
#10
Thank you all.
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Theory is descriptive, not prescriptive.


Quote by MiKe Hendryckz
theory states 1+1=2 sometimes in music 1+1=3.
#11
Quote by The_Sophist
I was thinking more along the lines of layering, harmony, advanced time signatures, things of that nature.


Well, if you know what you want to know... go and read everything you can about it and start applying it asap.
#12
This is where I went to read everything, lol.
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Theory is descriptive, not prescriptive.


Quote by MiKe Hendryckz
theory states 1+1=2 sometimes in music 1+1=3.