#1
Ive been playing for 2 years, which i think is a little short to start teaching but o well. Im gonna go to music college and probably study jazz, so im a serious player. I know basic theory like chord construction, scales, the chord degrees (IV)in the major scale, and arpeggios. I can improvise well and im ok at improvising with the chord changes. I can sweep and play fast and do all that rock stuff too. Do you think im ok to teach beginners? and whats a good hourly wage to charge.
#2
Logically you can teach anything you have a good grasp of. However, you sound like a guitar player to me, not a musician (if you take offense, so be it), so you can only teach guitar.

As for the hourly wage, I charge 12$ an hour as I do not have a college degree (yet, I'm 18).
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Theory is descriptive, not prescriptive.


Quote by MiKe Hendryckz
theory states 1+1=2 sometimes in music 1+1=3.
#3
Quote by Shecter78787
Ive been playing for 2 years, which i think is a little short to start teaching but o well. Im gonna go to music college and probably study jazz, so im a serious player. I know basic theory like chord construction, scales, the chord degrees (IV)in the major scale, and arpeggios. I can improvise well and im ok at improvising with the chord changes. I can sweep and play fast and do all that rock stuff too. Do you think im ok to teach beginners? and whats a good hourly wage to charge.


You sound better than the only lady in my town that teaches. She made mistakes left and right and one of her only students, who had been playing for 7 YEARS! Could barely remember any of the chords. She also had horrible rhythm (The student that is) She charged 18 dollars an hour. or was it 9?
#4
Theres more to teaching than being good at guitar, make sure you know HOW to teach in general, what to get a beginner doing. Also, do you have any bad guitar habits to pass on (only playing for 2 years this might be the case)? I don't want to be a downer, but personally I'd wait till I was a bit more sure I was well-rounded enough to teach. However, if you still think you're ready, go for it.


Edit: As for wage, 15$/hr is about right for beginners
#5
Quote by kd420
As for wage, 15$/hr is about right for beginners


Jesus! Why charge so much? Especially when your first starting off with basics.
#6
The more money you charge, the more money you make. Didn't you ever take a business class?
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Theory is descriptive, not prescriptive.


Quote by MiKe Hendryckz
theory states 1+1=2 sometimes in music 1+1=3.
#7
I don't have any bad habits or anything like that. I like to think of myself as a musician since i write my own songs >< but ya i would only teach guitar. i can read music and know a decent amount of theory. When Teaching I would always ask what the person wanted to learn not what i wanted them to learn. I would then teach them songs they liked and incorporate theory and technique that is in the song. In the beginning i would give them the basic open chords and things along those lines and probably work with a beginner guitar book like Essential Elements for Guitar
#8
Schecter, I think you have some good ideas about teaching. Using a published curriculum is a good idea. It reinforces the logical path to study. There's enough generic knowledge to fit any style that needs to be taught, so go for it. I strongly recommend the books from Alfred Publishing that are part of the "National Guitar Workshop" series. You might take a look at them.

While I do a bit of accomodating for some students I would encourage you to stick with a routine that works. You'll find yourself spending a lot of time working on songs beginners can't play correctly anyway. Keep them on the track that the book outlines (an occasional song tossed in) and you'll end up making it a better experience for everyone. Plus, as you teach the lessons you will learn how to teach them better.

I've been teaching full-time for about 10 years. I will be re-organizing my approach soon. I will probably NOT do private lessons for beginners. With some practice you can actually conduct beginner classes of up to 5 people and be quite effective. You just need the room...

That can make it more cost-effective for students. I charge $30 per hour for private lessons. I have a waiting list, which is part of what is prompting the development of a class structure. Private lessons are really for the students who have advanced, work harder, or demonstrate the ability to grasp the ideas.

Having said that, space and experience will dictate you teach one-on-one for a while. But, if you are studying jazz, and are willing to keep working, you should do just fine. Don't hesitate to ask for $15 per hour. If not now, in 3 months you'll be worth it. Just remember... day jobs are for people who can't play guitar. Good luck.
#9
^
That last bit isn't necessarily true, but okay.

I'd say $15 an hour. That was what my first teacher charged me per half-hour for basics, and he was a great teacher. He would've been worth paying $20 to. One thing that I've read is that a lot of guitarists get better teaching just because they're hearing scales and things like that all day long, so your relative pitch will probably get to be quite good teaching. That'd be worth doing for $15 an hour, imo.

Good luck with teaching.
Got Death Magnetic a day early!

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#10
Quote by Shecter78787
Do you think im ok to teach beginners?
I wouldn't pay to be taught by you, because:
Quote by kd420
Theres more to teaching than being good at guitar, make sure you know HOW to teach in general
My name is Andy
Quote by MudMartin
Only looking at music as math and theory, is like only looking at the love of your life as flesh and bone.

Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
Counting bodies like sheep to the rhythm of the war drums
#11
Revtfunk, thanks for that advice ill be sure to check out that curriculum to teach my students with. I will probably charge 15$ an hour for lessons at my house but 17-20 for me to go over to there house, to cover gas of course. I'm gonna look over all the material and prepare how im going to try to teach it and adjust for the persons needs/learning style.

Aenius Prime, I have to start somewhere and i give tips to my friends all the time, how am i going to become a good teacher if i don't teach. but i do see your point with my inexperience.
#12
Quote by Shecter78787
Aenius Prime, I have to start somewhere and i give tips to my friends all the time, how am i going to become a good teacher if i don't teach. but i do see your point with my inexperience.
I didn't say you shouldn't teach, I said I wouldn't pay for you to teach me. If you want to learn how to teach, don't charge for it until you've developed good teaching skills, or do some kind of teaching course.
My name is Andy
Quote by MudMartin
Only looking at music as math and theory, is like only looking at the love of your life as flesh and bone.

Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
Counting bodies like sheep to the rhythm of the war drums
#13
The most experienced teachers need to be teaching the least experienced students. I would not want you teaching any hypothetical friend of mine who is just starting. Sorry, 2 years just ain't enough.
#14
Quote by Arbitror
The most experienced teachers need to be teaching the least experienced students. I would not want you teaching any hypothetical friend of mine who is just starting. Sorry, 2 years just ain't enough.


+1

No offence, but it pisses me off when people consider professional teaching without at least 5 - 8 years performance and study behind them. To that experience I'd add formal music qualification as well. By all means, show your friends and family what you know for fun or stipend, but leave the public alone unless they approach you and even then it's best to state that you may not have the necessary experience.

I go to an accountant, I expect him to have university (college) education. I expect the same of those teaching my children in a classroom and the same again of the doctor I consult if I'm ill.

Beginners are particularly vulnerable to poor teaching practises. There exists enormous potential to permanently damage a beginning pupil's musical and technical development unless the teacher has a mature overview of all issues involved.
Last edited by R.Christie at Sep 22, 2008,
#15
Whilst there is obvious debate about how long you have been playing etc. If you really wanna do it and you think you can....then you can. If you think you won't be able to do it chances are you won't. When I started teaching I kept putting it off, but eventually just had to get it done and ever since the first minute of my first lesson I felt confident about it. If you are passionate about music and you know your stuff you will be able to sit and talkt to students about things for countless hours. Lucky for us we can work through method books etc with students. So, Id say the main points in beginning teaching are:

1. Do you know your shit? Because if you dont chances are you will get a student who knows more about a certain subject than you and that isn't going to look good if it happens on several occasions. Also, its only fair that students are being taught to the very best of your ability, and are not just a vehicle for you to get paid.

2. Do you think you can do it? This may sound all OTT...but as with anything else you need to believe in youself and have confidence. If students are coming round and your are sitting biting your nails and getting all shy they will spot this a mile off. You need to be and act confident. Of course to begin with there may be a slightly nervous aspect but thats different that having absolutely no confidence in wether you are able to teach people.

There are other things to consider but other people have already hinted at these. As for prices i am in the UK and I charge £15/hour at the moment which is relatively cheap since the going rate over here is £20

Andy
#16
Personally, and no offense intended, I consider 2 years of experience to be a bit too green. Thinking back to my own development, and you may well be ahead of where I was at 2 years, there was a lot of stuff I just hadn't figured out at that point. For example, at 2 years my technique was numerous corrections of bad habits away from where it would be later. I wouldn't want to teach that to a beginner.

I would start the planning phase now. Gathering your ideas about how you would go about this, developing a curriculum and so on. Over the next few years continue to refine this as your knowledge and technique improve. I'd wait until around 5 years to begin the actual teaching.
#17
^
Even then, that still may not be enough. I used to assist in teaching karate, and I can say from personal experience that teaching is something that you need to develop. You're not going to just kick ass as a teacher the first time you do it, and if you don't have any kind of lesson plan, you're not going to present yourself well. The above two posts are probably the best advice.
Got Death Magnetic a day early!

The Low-Cardinal of Zeppelinism - If you're a diehard fan of Zeppelin, join Zeppelinism here


Winner of the "Biggest Led Zeppelin Fuck" award in the CR forum (2 years running!)
#18
Shecter78787 this is super late but howd the lessons go? do you know how to read sheet music or just tabs? im also looking into giving lessons and im curious as to whether im good enough of a player to teach. thanks
#19
jleblanc09

I that case you can make a thread of your own! The people who still use these forums can help you better than someone who was last online in 2009 am I right?

So please don't resurrect dead threads, it contributes to spam and gives your problem less attention. We have a lot of teachers here on MT and I'm sure we can share some knowledge.
Quote by Jet Penguin
Theory: Not rules, just tools.

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