#1
Ok, so I just upgraded the strings on my guitar to 11 gauges.

But now my bridge (pretty sure it is a floating bridge) is sticking up quite a bit. A lot more than normal. And I understand that that is natural and what not, but do I need to make any adjustments to the springs in the back of the guitar? Or to any other part of my guitar? Not for tone or anything but just to make sure that my guitar doesn't explode into a fiery ball of infinite sadness and pain.

Any help would be appreciated.
#2
you might need to reset the saddle height, and then adjust intonation for the strings, because they are different gauges, your intonation could change. Also, I feel that thicker strings also cause more tension on the neck, so a small truss rod adjustment might be necessary eventually too. just some things to keep in mind. I play 11-54's myself, but I play mostly in Drop C, so that's my reasoning. Later...
#3
Quote by Seryaph
Ok, so I just upgraded the strings on my guitar to 11 gauges.

But now my bridge (pretty sure it is a floating bridge) is sticking up quite a bit. A lot more than normal. And I understand that that is natural and what not, but do I need to make any adjustments to the springs in the back of the guitar? Or to any other part of my guitar? Not for tone or anything but just to make sure that my guitar doesn't explode into a fiery ball of infinite sadness and pain.

Any help would be appreciated.



You may need to add another spring, if you have an empty space. Also the plate that attaches to the body of the guitar (it is called the "claw") could be screwed in farther to pull the bridge nearer parallel. Keep an eye on what is happening to the neck too. Truss rod may have to be adjusted.

The part on the far left is the claw. You can see the screws I mean:

Last edited by Chorduroy at Sep 21, 2008,
#4
Quote by fade177
you might need to reset the saddle height, and then adjust intonation for the strings, because they are different gauges, your intonation could change. Also, I feel that thicker strings also cause more tension on the neck, so a small truss rod adjustment might be necessary eventually too. just some things to keep in mind. I play 11-54's myself, but I play mostly in Drop C, so that's my reasoning. Later...



Yeah, I already know I am going to have to adjust the intonation, I can hear how flat my big E string is at 12th fret and it is like getting stabbed in the ear drum.
Any suggestions on adjusting the truss rod? I have experience adjusting the springs and the claw in the back, but have never touched the truss rod. Kinda freaks me out, I have heard some terrible stories about people who did not know what they were doing destroying their guitar because they ****ed around with the truss rod.


Oh, and thanks for the answers everybody.
#5
there are some good vids on youtube about adjucting the truss rod, the trick is to find out if its under or overbowed and making very small adjustments to the truss rod