#1
well , the first i must say , is that i don't know much about harmonizing and i want to ask what scale can i use to armonize in this chord progression :

Dm - F - C - Em

the main scale i were using for the solo were the D minor scale , but i don't know which one or ones i can use to armonize it

please help me , the song is for a state contest , and it must be ready for the next week
#2
you might be able to use the pentonic scale on the fourth fret or a nice litl Em arpeggio.
#3
That chord progression is not strictly in D minor. The Em makes it D Dorian. Try using D dorian to make your harmonies. You might also try using D natural minor over Dm F C, then changing to D Dorian over the Em.
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Last edited by Ænimus Prime at Sep 22, 2008,
#5
Quote by damnphrophet
well , the first i must say , is that i don't know much about harmonizing and i want to ask what scale can i use to armonize in this chord progression :

Dm - F - C - Em

the main scale i were using for the solo were the D minor scale , but i don't know which one or ones i can use to armonize it

please help me , the song is for a state contest , and it must be ready for the next week

You harmonize with whatever scale you're soloing in, you just pick an interval to harmonize in, for example if you're in D minor just double up with the notes in the scale that are a third above the ones in the solo.
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#6
Quote by Ænimus Prime
That chord progression is not strictly in D minor. The Em makes it D Dorian. Try using D dorian to make your harmonies. You might also try using D natural minor over Dm F C, then changing to D Dorian over the Em.

The plagal cadence between the F chord and the C chord says its in C major.
#7
Personally I think it's pretty ambiguous. The lead part could influence the tonality a lot.
My name is Andy
Quote by MudMartin
Only looking at music as math and theory, is like only looking at the love of your life as flesh and bone.

Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
Counting bodies like sheep to the rhythm of the war drums
#8
I was going to say exactly what Aenimus Prime said.

Quote by demonofthenight
The plagal cadence between the F chord and the C chord says its in C major.

It is not a cadence at all if it does not end the progression. A cadence is a harmonic movement at the end of a section or piece, not in the middle. If the progression ended F to C and the tonal center of the piece was C, then it would be a plagal cadence.
#9
THANKS!!

i'm gonna use the D natural minor ( that sounds as C major ) and D dorian , and i'll write it tomorrow , and maybe soon ill post the entire song in my profile
#10
Quote by PSM
It is not a cadence at all if it does not end the progression. A cadence is a harmonic movement at the end of a section or piece, not in the middle. If the progression ended F to C and the tonal center of the piece was C, then it would be a plagal cadence.
Cadences dont need to finish peices, it's still a cadence if it resolves a phrase. If you were to use that in a song and you finished a phrase or a part on any chord other than the C chord, it would sound unresolved. Especially since C - Em movements are probably the weekest sort of movement in music. This is why it sounds ambiguous.

Just because a song start or ends on a certain chord doesnt mean its written in that key.
#12
Quote by damnphrophet
i also use Gsus4 in place of C , altough it sound very similar
It would:

Gsus4(lol holy chord lolol!!11!):G - C - D
C maj: C - E - G

Both chords contain a C and a G which almost always suggest C major. Try adding an E to your Gsus chord (or a D to your C maj chord), see if you like that.
#13
Quote by demonofthenight
The plagal cadence between the F chord and the C chord says its in C major.

**** I hate that.

It starts on, resolves to, and the tonality is based around, D. Namely, D minor.

It's not in "C major", because then you'd solo trying to resolve to C, and it'd sound proper tripe.
Well, nowhere near as good as it could.
Try soloing in C major, over a D minor/dorian progression, such as this.
Sounds horrible resolving to the seventh. Or just pulls towards the TONIC, D.

I usually agree with you demonofthenight, but this is something that I despise.

Quote by demonofthenight
Just because a song start or ends on a certain chord doesnt mean its written in that key.


Once again. Your ear will tell you that it resolves on D. It's in D. Not always does the first chord determine, but this is a simple case, and works in favour of my point.
Of course this is all subjective, but I am very sure of my opinion.
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Last edited by Daisy_Ramirez_ at Sep 23, 2008,