#1
I have a Squier Strat and a Jackson DK2S. I always noticed that the Jackson played a little easier, like the strings were resisting a little less. Someone recommended me to put .010 strings on it instead of .009. So I bought .010 strings to test them on my Squier ( Replacing strings from .009's to .010's on a Jackson is too much pain in the ass; someone in a shop will do it for me).
With the thicker strings the Squier is better for chords and stuff but lead guitar is better with the Jackson from now. If I put .010's on the Jackson will it still be easier then on the Squier? Because I like the way the Jackson plays pretty much from now (except for fast Iron Maiden strums etc, because my pick tramples under the strings because they are a bit sloppy) Won't it actually improve? Or is it ridiculous that I'm playing a metal guitar with .009 strings?
Quote by razorback91
Im sorry, I just don't see how you could argue that hardcore isn't metal. That just seems arrogant to me.

Yes, its its own kind of metal, but its still metal.
#2
10's are usually the most common strings, 9's are too thin and loose for me.

10's tighten up a little bit over 9's
#3
are both frets legnth the same? That could make a difference...
When you do things right, people won't be sure you've done anything at all
#4
Quote by ClementWave
10's are usually the most common strings, 9's are too thin and loose for me.

10's tighten up a little bit over 9's
+1
#5
Sounds like your Jackson is a shorter scaled instrument than the Squire. If the Squire is true to it's Fender roots it's a 25-1/2" scale. The other most common scale length is 24-3/4" used by Gibson. Longer scale lengths have tighter string tension because the longer string needs to be tightened more than a shorter sctring to reach equal notes.
Moving on.....
#6
Quote by 08L1V10N
Or is it ridiculous that I'm playing a metal guitar with .009 strings?


nah. and .010s are just as light enough to tune up half-a-step. and are easier to re-string!