#1
My friend Sandy wants to get duel citizenship for Germany, because she has ancestry, and she has intention of going there in the future. We've looked it up, and we found this:

'People born to a parent who was a German citizen at the time of birth are usually German citizens on that basis. It does not matter whether they were born in Germany or not. Nor does it matter if the parent is a naturalised German.'

What exactly does this mean? We get the idea of it, but not who the relative has to be, etc.


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#3
Quote by Internal Chaos

'People born to a parent who was a German citizen at the time of birth are usually German citizens on that basis. It does not matter whether they were born in Germany or not. Nor does it matter if the parent is a naturalised German.'

People whose father or mother was a German citizen at the time of birth is classified as a German citizen (even if they weren't born in Germany).
It does not matter if the parent was not born in Germany as long as they were a citizen at the time of birth.

Thats what I took it for...
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#4
That just means that if your parent was a german citizen (whether they were naturalised or not) when you were born, you are entitled to german citizenship. There may be other conditions that would enable citizenship though.
#6
It doesn't specify, which means I guess could mean either mother or father. I'm not sure on the father part though.

EDIT: If her mother was a german citizen then your friend shouldn't really have too much trouble getting a german citizenship.
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#7
Parent = Mother or Father. It doesn't get more specific than that.
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#9
basically if your mom or dad is a german, you inherit the citizenship. unlike the USA, for example, where you have to be born to be considered a citizen.

And btw, you cant get a double citizenship in germany if the country you're from isn't in the EU. I'm of american origin and living in germany, but I would have to give up my american citizenship if i wanted to become a german resident.
#10
her other option due to a recent case in the EC courts is that if she were to marry a german/any EU citizen then she would be entitled to live within the EU, not matter what their immigration policy is.
don't know if that helps though


edit: otherwise i think the law is pretty clear, so the important question is at which point her mum lost her german citizenship, if her mum was still a german citizen when she was born then sandy is entitled to german citizenship.
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