#1
hey i havn't been here in a long time, it good to be back.(new account)
any way so im am in a metal band now. but the problem is that i have always played blues rock, so every thing i play sounds blues-y.

WHAT DO I DO?
#2
Change your name to Kirk Hammett.
Quote by HorizonShadow
Just eat the headstock.

That'll make you look mad.
#4
Learn the Art of Shred.
If you listen to enough metal im sure it'll change eventually.
Gear:
Fender Strat American Deluxe,
Halfsize Custom Electro-acoustic
Yamaha Classical
Tanglewood Dreadnought

10w Marshall
120w Line 6 Spider II
Marshall JCM2000 DSL 401

Yamaha Digital Piano
Yamaha Keyboard
#5
Quote by ubuntu
hey i havn't been here in a long time, it good to be back.(new account)
any way so im am in a metal band now. but the problem is that i have always played blues rock, so every thing i play sounds blues-y.

WHAT DO I DO?


You may want to edit that out...
Just saying...
Signature? What's a signature?

Quote by WlCmToTheJungle
the house burnt down
pics coming soon!
<.<
>,>


Quote by metalscott76
No!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


Best theory lesson EVER!
#6
Most of the classic metal solos are very much based on the blues. Play faster than normal, use notes from the full minor scale a bit, and avoid the major third; you should be good to go.


That's the blueprint of every Iron Maiden solo.
#9
Quote by Athetosis
Change your name to Kirk Hammett.

That is EXACTLY what I thought when I read this




#10
One thing you can do right away is learn how to incorporate both the Aeolian and Dorian modes into your blues phrasing. This will open things up tremendously.
It's a long discussion on HOW to do that but you can start by learning both modes and comparing them to the pentatonic scale. What notes are different? Which are the same? How do the other notes change the sound of the pentatonic?
Doing your own research will get you a lot farther than me just spouting off information.
#11
having the same problem dude. i cant stop the pentatonic blues crap with thrash riffs
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#12
Quote by bangoodcharlote
Most of the classic metal solos are very much based on the blues. Play faster than normal, use notes from the full minor scale a bit, and avoid the major third; you should be good to go.


That's the blueprint of every Iron Maiden solo.


Repeated for emphasis.


Also, "braking" is what you do in a car when the light turns yellow (or jam on the gas like me ). "Breaking" is the correct homophone for future reference.
#13
Quote by bangoodcharlote
Repeated for emphasis.


Also, "braking" is what you do in a car when the light turns yellow (or jam on the gas like me ). "Breaking" is the correct homophone for future reference.

Quoted for truth
#14
Quote by imgooley
Quoted for truth
The biggest truth is about my driving, though.


Yes, I am a good driver. Girls can drive well, too, so long as the vehicle is a Jetta.

/spam

Another idea is to use the major V or even V7 chord. You probably wouldn't be playing full major, let alone dominant, chords in metal, but if you had a progression like A5 C5 G5 A5 A5 G5 F5 E5, use A natural minor and minor pentatonic/blues over the first 7 powerchords, and then A HARMONIC minor over E5 for a dark and exotic Spanish/Arabian sound. If you don't know the scale, it is 1 2 b3 4 5 b6 7, just natural minor with a natural seventh, but by raising the seventh from minor to major (natural), you create a minor third interval between the b6 and 7. Most Western scales only have half or whole step intervals, not a minor third, and it's that minor third that gives the scale its exotic sound.

In A Minor, the notes are: A B C D E F G#.
#15
Quote by bangoodcharlote
Repeated for emphasis.


sorry, I just found it hilarious that you quoted yourself for emphasis. that's possibly the most egotistical thing I've ever seen lol

#16
yea i would steer a way from the pentatonic and head towards seven tone minor modes

be sure to raise the seven
#17
Quote by whoisthisguy
yea i would steer a way from the pentatonic and head towards seven tone minor modes

be sure to raise the seven

I would stay just about as far away from modes as possible - they're simply not needed at this stage and there's absolutely no point bringing them into the discussion.

TS, BGC is right, just play your blues licks but play them faster and more aggressively...attack the strings harder, overbend your bends, vibrato wider and faster etc. It's not so much about the notes or scale you use, it's how you use those things. As far as using other notes you'l find it much easier to approach this as the good old minor pentatonic with accidentals....simply explore those notes that aren't in the scale and see the effect they have when you try to use them.

It's all about tension and resolution, if you take yourself away from the scale then you introduce a degree of instability into your music, as you move back to the notes of the scale things will come back together. Use that, play with it and get a feel for how it works and try to incorporate it into your solos.
Actually called Mark!

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...it's a seagull

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i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


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#18
Quote by The4thHorsemen
sorry, I just found it hilarious that you quoted yourself for emphasis. that's possibly the most egotistical thing I've ever seen lol
When I'm the only person to answer the question and not make a Kirk Hammett (don't careif that's spelled right) joke, then yes, what I said needs to be repeated.

TS, please ignore "Whoisthisguy." His post is very incomplete and doesn't explain why and how you should play that way. Listen to Steven and me.
#20
Quote by bangoodcharlote



Girls can drive well, too, so long as the vehicle is a Jetta.

/spam



This is when I realized you are a female