#1
Well I just need some info on Vibrato I mean for some reason thats that only thing I can't do well. It just suck's when I do it anyone help lol?
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#2
You're going to want to bend the string repeatedly at a speed that fits what you're doing.

Don't bend it too far or it'll sound like a donkey's dick. Practise some stuff and it'll sound great after a while.

Good luck!
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#3
wiggle your finger around. it's pretty simple. just look at people.
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#4
Quote by thomaserak
wiggle your finger around. it's pretty simple. just look at people.

Shit I know how to do it but somtimes it seems like I need to sprinkle magic on my figners in order it to sound even decent
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#5
You basically bend the string up a half step and back down.

It comes with practice. Proper vibrato is not an easy skill to accomplish.
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#6
Quote by firebreath07


Proper vibrato is not an easy skill to accomplish.

Yes Thank your the statement help's me feel like I can acomplish it now SERIOUSLY I think it's like a simple thing but it's hard
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#7
Watch: Warren Haynes- Electric Blues and Slide Guitar Hotlicks.
#8
get a metronome and practice getting an even speed whilst hitting the same pitch every time.
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#9
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Well I just need some info on Vibrato I mean for some reason thats that only thing I can't do well. It just suck's when I do it anyone help lol?


dude theres tons of video lessons about vibrato on this site
watch those and youll improve in no time
#11
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#12
Quote by Broken-pick
Imagine opening a door knob.

+1000

Smartest thing said so far. It is important to move your whole hand for proper vibrato. The fingers remain stiff, only the hand moves. There are other forms of vibrato for stringed instrumnts, but for guitar, this is the most important and fundamental one. If you want to vibrato while bending, you can use two or more fingers simultaneously, otherwise one finger will suffice.

We have a large video section here at UG that sure can help you. Also look here for technical advice:
www.guitarnoise.com

EDIT: Dammit I know there was an article aout vibrato on that site, but I can't find it. Sorry.
Last edited by TheQuailman at Sep 23, 2008,
#14
Some people are talking about string bending here. The TS meant vibrato, as in wiggling your fingers.

In this case you really need to make sure you are pressing down DAMN hard on your neck. Move your whole hand and try to not move you r finger too much. It's okay if it slides and rotates a little.
#15
Quote by GogglesVK
Some people are talking about string bending here. The TS meant vibrato, as in wiggling your fingers.


I'm confused as to what exactly you think the mechanics of vibrato are...in guitar terms the best way to explain it is to say that it is a series of small, repeated bends and it should be treated as thus.
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#16
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
I'm confused as to what exactly you think the mechanics of vibrato are...in guitar terms the best way to explain it is to say that it is a series of small, repeated bends and it should be treated as thus.


When I use vibrato I don't really "bend" te strings...its more of a left to right-rotatey-wiggly motion. Sounds the same as all of the blues videos and music I listen to.
#17
Quote by GogglesVK
When I use vibrato I don't really "bend" te strings...its more of a left to right-rotatey-wiggly motion. Sounds the same as all of the blues videos and music I listen to.


Well that's all very well and good but how wide can you get your vibrato? I'm not saying that a wide vibrato is inherently better but I know that with the way I vibrato I can get just about any kind I want; it's all about options and control in my opinion.
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#18
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Well that's all very well and good but how wide can you get your vibrato? I'm not saying that a wide vibrato is inherently better but I know that with the way I vibrato I can get just about any kind I want; it's all about options and control in my opinion.


+1. Moving your finger parallel to the neck back and forth is nigh useless and is a waste of energy. On a fretless instrument this is a perfectly valid method, but unfortunately the anchor point of the string is the fret, and since you are moving the string behind the fret and not adjusting its position to increase its tension you are effectively doing little if anything at all to change the string's tension. If you move the string along the fret then you vary its tension enough to actually cause a change in pitch.

Also note that your vibrato should be contextually appropriate. If you are sustaining a note then it would be advisable to do wider, slower, controlled vibrato, but if you are only hitting it for a short time then faster vibrato is certainly acceptable, if not expected.
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#19
^ Moving your finger parallel to the string does achieve a slight vibrato because it stretches and relaxes the string slightly. For rock it's not really wide enough but it's used all the time in classical guitar (and is the only acceptable form). I know Steve Vai and I think BB King (as well as others) use a combination of parallel and perpendicular motion to achieve their vibrato.
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#20
its one of those things that just comes with time and doing it.

i remember thinking id never get it, and then one day i just felt it click.
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#21
Quote by ze monsta
As said above, it's better to move the whole hand when using vibrato. Look at B.B King.

BB King's is the shit
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#22
Quote by pEdAl2
^ Moving your finger parallel to the string does achieve a slight vibrato because it stretches and relaxes the string slightly. For rock it's not really wide enough but it's used all the time in classical guitar (and is the only acceptable form). I know Steve Vai and I think BB King (as well as others) use a combination of parallel and perpendicular motion to achieve their vibrato.


Quote by Mo Jiggity
On a fretless instrument this is a perfectly valid method, but unfortunately the anchor point of the string is the fret, and since you are moving the string behind the fret and not adjusting its position to increase its tension you are effectively doing little if anything at all to change the string's tension.


I'm well aware... hence the use of "little" instead of "NOTHING AT ALL EVAR."
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#23
Well start by making sure you're not bending out of key, that always sounds like poop.

Second just keep practicing, it comes with time. I watch a lot of Zakk Wylde vids, may not be your style but the man has crazy vibrato, I've modeled mine after his and if you do it at the right time they can be pretty epic.
#24
for narrow vibrato i just press the strings down a bit harder and then release to a little less than normal. it sounds pretty good and isnt to strong.


for wider vibrato everyone else pretty much explained
#25
there are ac ouple ways to acheive this.
-Clapton method: wiggle the string with your index finger perpendicular to the frets (just search a video of him on youtube and you're bound to find it)

-BB King Method: hold your index finger down on the note and wiggle your wrist. this is the most popular method, i find. (like clapton, any BB video can show you this.)

Yngwie method: this is an obnoxiously wide vibrato, listen to the end of any phrase Yngwie has ever played. actually bend the note across the fretborad with your third finger.
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#26
For vibrato on higher strings: the key is to "pivot" your wrist. The string bending up and down should be from you pulling away from the fretboard, then easing your hand, then quickly pulling. You shouldn't actively feel like you are doing "up, down, up down" (if that makes any sense)

For vibrato after a string bend up (that quintessential rock "waaaaoooowwww" sound): Bend the string up, but then "let go" with your hand, almost your whole forearm area actually. This part is REALLY HARD. Basically, after the big bend, don't fight the string for like a millisecond, then re-bend back and let go again, all very quickly.

The key is not to be forcing the strings to move up and down. It's more of a "fight" and "release" pattern. I'm not sure if this helps at all, but I'm just trying to describe the feel of it.
#27
Quote by pEdAl2
^ Moving your finger parallel to the string does achieve a slight vibrato because it stretches and relaxes the string slightly. For rock it's not really wide enough but it's used all the time in classical guitar (and is the only acceptable form). I know Steve Vai and I think BB King (as well as others) use a combination of parallel and perpendicular motion to achieve their vibrato.

Steve calls it "Circular Vibrato". Now that's some good vibrato. very tasteful.

Before you tackle that, try bending in ONE direction first, to get a feel for bending. The bend up, then bend down trick you mentioned is so not the way to first approach vibrato. One may have an over-shot bend, and the other might be flat. Bend in one direction first, and once that's second nature, then you can dive into the Up,down, up,down type vibrato used by the metal masters.

Crazy pitch wiggle.
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#28
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