#1
is there any way that the voltage of a guitar pickup can be compared or transfered (i dont no what the word is) to the sound of it or frequency of a note
#2
the voltage will shape the note and determine the gain of the pickup, as far as frequency, it might however the difference is nothing you would ever notice. Your tuner won't even notice!
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#3
Quote by chrispfried
is there any way that the voltage of a guitar pickup can be compared or transfered (i dont no what the word is) to the sound of it or frequency of a note


yes, the frequency of the voltage corresponds to the frequency of the strings vibration. it's alternating current, just like your wall. which has a frequency of 60 hz (or 50 in some places). and the amplitude determines the volume of the note.
#4
Quote by ValoRhoads
the voltage will shape the note and determine the gain of the pickup, as far as frequency, it might however the difference is nothing you would ever notice. Your tuner won't even notice!


then how does the tuner know the frequency? there would be no current through your cable with no electromotive force (voltage)
#5
so if i put a mutimeter to the cables or something (tell me where to put them please) this will tell me which pickup has a stronger sound or something like that?
#6
sorry for my terrible language let me rephrase that if i can- if i use a multimeter to test the voltage of a pickup by putting the cables onto the pickup electrical thing, i can tell if the pickup is strong or weak?
#7
i guess there would be a difference in the voltages. they'll both be pretty low.

but you're gonna want to plug in a cable and then put the multimeter leads on the connections. it doesn't really matter which goes where since it's alternating current. you can touch your fingers on one of them to hold it on, but not both of them.

i don't know what your multimeter looks like but just find a voltage measurment that says AC, and as long as you don't change the setting when you change the pickup selector it will work.


the tricky part is that the voltage will be dependent upon how hard you pick. so be sure to keep it consistant (or if you want to be scientific, do a few trials of each setting and average them.)

i've never tried this with a guitar. your multimeter might not respond in time to get accurate measurements before the string dampens (if you have an Ebow it would come in handy, but that's unlikely), but you might be able to find some information depending on what you're looking for.
#8
you can only check voltage drop wiht a mutli meter and you should get a full drop at the connections i beleive

what you need to do is check VD at each component if something is "weak" it should have a higher drop comparitively to another compomnent quite similiar. ei both coils VD should drop quite similiar to each other with low number. a high number on 1 coil would indicate a bad connection or high resistance

one other good test is to measure resisstance(ohms) in your pots to make sure they are funtioning properly. move them back and forth to see how much resistance you are getting wiht them, and check continuity across the coils, switch and wires and sauders to make sure you have no unwanted resistance or open circuit

EDIT: you should get a full drop at the connections with the volume all the way down you should have a low drop with the volume all the way up as the signal still has to go to the amp
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Last edited by lbc_sublime at Sep 22, 2008,