#1
The Diatonic Chord types of the major scale are

Maj/m/m/maj/maj/m/diminished


What are the chord types of the Natural minor scale?
#2
start at the sixth

in otherwords, m/d/M/m/m/M/M

all a natural minor is is a sixth of a major tone, say, the natural minor in the key of C is Am, and the notes in the key of A natural minor are all the same as in the key of C, only they start on A.
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#3
Well, what's funny is it's all a big circle, so if you start on the last minor chord of the major scale, and keep going around, you'll have the chords for the natural minor scale.

so...

m/diminished/Maj/m/m/Maj/Maj

But you should really change it to this...The Harmonic minor...it's so much cooler...just change that 2nd minor chord into a major chord...You'll hear what i mean.

m/Diminished/Maj/m/Maj/Maj/Maj
#4
Thank you! now why are the chords of the maj and minor scales the way they are?

why is it a maj/m/m/maj/maj/m/dim? how did this system come about? what is the purpose?
#5
Quote by newguitars08
Thank you! now why are the chords of the maj and minor scales the way they are?

why is it a maj/m/m/maj/maj/m/dim? how did this system come about? what is the purpose?
Am and C major are considered the relative majors and minors of each other since they contain the same notes. You can worry about how the impacts music once you have a firm grasp of the major scale and not just on a guitarist level. The answer leads to modes and that topic always sends this forum to hell.
#6
Quote by Hobo279
But you should really change it to this...The Harmonic minor...it's so much cooler


It's not about being cooler. Harmonic minor just makes the leading tone actually lead into the next octave. It also gives you a V (major) chord instead of a v (minor) which is more pleasing to the ear.
#7
Quote by newguitars08
Thank you! now why are the chords of the maj and minor scales the way they are?

why is it a maj/m/m/maj/maj/m/dim? how did this system come about? what is the purpose?
Those chords only use the notes of the major scale, minor scale is only the same in theory, in practise its different.

In minor scales, your chords are effectively this:
i min/ii half dim or min/bIII maj or flat aug/iv min/V dom7 or maj/bVI maj/vii0 natural full diminished

Why? because the dominant seventh has a better lead to the minor i chord. The full diminished can be used as a substitute for a V chord in a V-I cadence. The bVI chord is an awesome predominant chord. Some people like the way the ii half diminished leads to and from the V chord. Some people like to use the augmented III chord as a predominant chord.

When writing in minor keys, you dont say "okay, I'm writing in strict natural minor or strict harmonic minor." Doing this will either cause your song to resolve to the wrong chord or sound REALLY unstable. Instead, you use elements of all three minor scales.
#8
the reason some chords are major, minor, or diminished is because of the way chords are constructed.

your basic chord is made of the first, third, and fifth degrees. It it has a major 3rd and perfect fifth it's a major chord, a minor third and perfect fifth its a minor chord.

so take C Major.
C D E F G A B

first is C. take the 1, 3, and 5 and you get C E G. the E is a major 3rd from C and G is a perfect 5th from C. therefore it is C Major.

now if you take D, it's D F A. F is the major 3rd and A is the perfect 5th. it's a major chord.

now, B is the oddball. you take the 3rd and fifth and you get B D F. B to D is a minor third, but B to F is a flat fifth. A first, minor third and flat five are what make up a diminished chord.

and it's also to have major third and sharp five, which is called an augmented chord, but they're not common in major or natural minor keys.
#9
Quote by The4thHorsemen


now if you take D, it's D F A. F is the major 3rd and A is the perfect 5th. it's a major chord.



D Major is D, F#, A.

D Minor is D, F, A.
#10
Quote by TK1
start at the sixth

in otherwords, m/d/M/m/m/M/M

all a natural minor is is a sixth of a major tone, say, the natural minor in the key of C is Am, and the notes in the key of A natural minor are all the same as in the key of C, only they start on A.


So....in a Major key, the V chord naturally resolves to the I correct? does this rule apply if our I chord is Am for example which would make the V chord Em?
#11
Quote by kwikfingers-uk
So....in a Major key, the V chord naturally resolves to the I correct? does this rule apply if our I chord is Am for example which would make the V chord Em?
Yeah, but the V chord in Am is Emaj.

Keep in mind, uppercase numerals are major and lowercase numerals are minor
#12
Quote by kwikfingers-uk
So....in a Major key, the V chord naturally resolves to the I correct? does this rule apply if our I chord is Am for example which would make the V chord Em?

Yes. It does. Have a read of this Chord Progressions

Though it is not as strong as when the V is a major chord - hence the creation of the Harmonic minor which sees the raising of the Natural Minor's flat 7th degree to make the V chord major, bringing that even stronger resolution to the minor key.
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#13
Keep in mind that there a certain common conventions involved in writing in a minor key. One of these is the use of a major chord built off of the dominant, because it offers a much stronger resolution. This is so prevalent that, in Western music, "minor" is simply assumed to have a major V chord. The use of a minor chord in its place would be seen as strange is most cases.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#15
i think guitarists today abuse it. if you truly want to understand start with the crusade by josh urban it all comes down to this if you don't you are doomed to the land of ignorance like 3/4 of this website

sorry for the evilism

you should start music then guitar not vice versa
#16
Hi, ive been trying to make a little table as follows:

Major Diatonic Chords


A Bm C#m D E F#m G#dim
B C#m D#m E F# G#m A#dim
C Dm Em F G Am Bdim
D Em F#m G A Bm C#dim
E F#m G#m A B C#m D#dim
F Gm Am Bb C Dm Edim
G Am Bm C D Em F#dim

Minor Chords
-from the (ascending version of the) melodic minor, and the aeolian (natural) minor scale


Am Bdim/m C/aug Dm/M Em/M F/#dim G/#dim
Bm C#dim/#m D/aug Em/M F#m/#M G/#dim A/#dim
Cm Ddim/m E/aug Fm/M Gm/M A/#dim B/#dim
Dm Edim/m F Gm/M Am/M Bb/dim C/#dim
Em F#dim/#m G/aug Am/M Bm/M C/#dim D/#dim
Fm Gdim/m Ab/b#aug Bbm/bM C#m/#M D#/#dim E/dim
Gm Adim/m Bb/baug Cm/M Dm/M Eb/#dim F/#dim

I thnik the minor part is wrong in places. Would some one be kind enough to put me right?

thanks, Craig.
#17
I think I see what you're doing there, craig

I don't think I've ever seen a major iv chord in a minor key. It's entirely possible though as I would expect an iv chord to have the same effect as a predominant as an IV (right?).

Also, bVI chords are almost always major in minor keys. They're used as yet another sort of predominant chord. I'm pretty sure they're always flattened (so it's bVI instead of VI).

And theres some innocent errors in there.

i think guitarists today abuse it.
Like you mean how some metal guys shred with some melodic augmented intervals (mostly the augmented second) and call it "harmonic minor?" I like to think of minor scales (therefore harmonic minor) as relating to a chord progression. So in my eyes, most guitarists don't even use the minor scale.
Last edited by demonofthenight at Nov 21, 2008,