#1
hi there, Im getting a bit obssessed with my practice sessions, well in fact I dont think about anything else in all the damn day!!!

I really want to avoid getting bad habits, lately I only set the metronome to speeds where I dont feel any tension and my brain can fix errors that I notice while playing.

My goal is to be able to play really really fast and accurately, and I know how to do it (I think)

One of the things I should do to reach my goal is to keep my fingers close to the fretboard when I play. And many times I can accomplish that, but it really depends on the lick that Im playing, specially Im worried about my middle finger, I cant keep it down while Im using the pinky and ring ones, if I force my finger to go down then I feel Im doing too much work with my left hand (tension=bad!)

So, is it normal that the middle finger behaves like this? should I play even slower? or will my fingers fret the notes in time if I speed up the metronome SLOWLY? or will they learn by themselves to stay close to the strings as I get faster?

Im really worried about it
#2
I have the same problem when working through speed mechanics for lead guitar by troy stetina. I find that concentrating too hard in keeping my fingers low to the strings in itself causes tention. Just relax your hand in a position close to the strings and forget about what your fingers are doing individually if they are not needed as much as the others. It will all come with dedication and patience (as annoying as that is!)
"If you want beef, then bring the ruckus." - Marilyn Monroe
#3
Quote by Gacel
hi there, Im getting a bit obssessed with my practice sessions, well in fact I dont think about anything else in all the damn day!!!

I really want to avoid getting bad habits, lately I only set the metronome to speeds where I dont feel any tension and my brain can fix errors that I notice while playing.

My goal is to be able to play really really fast and accurately, and I know how to do it (I think)

One of the things I should do to reach my goal is to keep my fingers close to the fretboard when I play. And many times I can accomplish that, but it really depends on the lick that Im playing, specially Im worried about my middle finger, I cant keep it down while Im using the pinky and ring ones, if I force my finger to go down then I feel Im doing too much work with my left hand (tension=bad!)

So, is it normal that the middle finger behaves like this? should I play even slower? or will my fingers fret the notes in time if I speed up the metronome SLOWLY? or will they learn by themselves to stay close to the strings as I get faster?

Im really worried about it

You need to check out Freepower's video's, hes made one that covers this, i found it really helpfull.
#4
I'd recommend to spend some time not even using the metronome.
Just go very, very (Read: VERY) slowly, not even to any tempo... just millimetre movements concentrating on keeping all other fingers still with as little tension as possible.
I started doing this myself just a couple of weeks ago for only maybe 20 (intense) minutes a day and have started seeing great results.

Edit: I second Freepower's videos.
#5
This is one of those things that can seem painfully obvious when you realize it.
Until then it seems nearly impossible. Here's a reply I made to a similar thread.
I'm trying to convey what my inner experience is like:


Hm, maybe a "thought experiment" would work....

Imagine the muscles that move your fingers are nearly paralyzed. All you can do
with them is let them drape over the fretboard. The only other thing you can do
with them is, when they make contact with a string, is slightly stiffen them so they
don't collapse.

Now try and play. Since you "can't" move your fingers, you'll have to make micro-tilt
adjustments with your wrist to get them to the right place. Relax your arm so that
it's "dead weight" is applying most of the force to fret the string through the stiffened
finger.

Naturally your fingers are going to move some, but it might give you the general
feel of motion economy at higher speeds. To me it kind of feels like my fingers don't
even move.
#6
^ thats a great example. Finally, it takes time! Practice slowly (25bpm and less) for 20 mins a day on economy of motion and your technique will improve gradually, but continually, I promise.
#7
Quote by Freepower
^ thats a great example. Finally, it takes time! Practice slowly (25bpm and less) for 20 mins a day on economy of motion and your technique will improve gradually, but continually, I promise.


hehe from your posts I notice that you love really slow tempos, and its ok to play slowly, but 25bpm ... well the 20 mins will be gone and I would have played the lick 10-12 times!

if I can play cleanly at 80bpm, then I can practice the same stuff a lot more in the same 20 mins, right? ^^

anyways today Ive already started to slow down the metronome even more and pay a lot of attention to my left hand fingers

thanks a lot you guys for your replies
#8
Quote by Gacel

if I can play cleanly at 80bpm, then I can practice the same stuff a lot more in the same 20 mins, right? ^^


There is a big difference. At 80 bpm, even though you can play it cleanly , you are still using muscle memory - you are not really "telling" your fingers how to move, they are just repeating the learned movements. At extreme slow tempos, such as 25bpm, you actually are able to consciously tell the fingers what to do, which is essential if you are trying to make a technique modification.
#9
Quote by se012101
At extreme slow tempos, such as 25bpm, you actually are able to consciously tell the fingers what to do, which is essential if you are trying to make a technique modification.


mmmm, ok, now I get it, if I want to fix some problem I need to play at a speed that allows my BRAIN to command my hands, kk
#11
If the human race had a much longer life span, we would probably approach everything like this.
Originally posted by TapMaster
If you break a JEM you know your going to go to hell when you die

Only member of the 'This is too immature for me' club.
#12
We should anyways.
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Theory is descriptive, not prescriptive.


Quote by MiKe Hendryckz
theory states 1+1=2 sometimes in music 1+1=3.
#13
Yes but then theres the big argument 'why waste your life, just live it' which is true, because humans waste so much of their lives on basic needs and bumming around, we don't have time to live life to its fullest by practicing everything with careful thought and consideration.
Originally posted by TapMaster
If you break a JEM you know your going to go to hell when you die

Only member of the 'This is too immature for me' club.
#14
arg. no, i like more action than thinking to be honest xD
that must be why i enjoy improvising music / improvised comedy moar. just rox.
#15
life is not so short, i think its worth taking the time to learn to do things properly ^^ guitar or anything else!!!

i enjoy my practice sessions and I feel very alive!!!