#1
Hi
I am trying to change my string guage from 9 - 42 to 10 - 46. I know you are meant to adjust something as you do it so that the neck doesn't have to much pressure. I have been told by different people that its the screw at the top of the neck and by others the springs at the back of the guitar. can some one please give me the steps needed to change the strings to a higher guage. eg
1. Remove old strings.
2. loosen springs ect
3. ect.
Any help would be greatly appreiated.
#2
thats not really a drastic step, so not much will really be needed.
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#3
depends on your type of guitar.

if you have a floating bridge then going to the heavier gauge will mean adjustment to the bridge height by adding a spring or two and/or adjusting the claw screw holding the springs to the body.

the screw at the top of the neck adjusts the tension on the truss rod, which counteracts the string tension and keeps the neck from bowing. it's unlikely that you will need any adjustment to the truss rod for the small change in string gauge that you are talking about.
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#4
its not a big change, so u wont need to adjust the neck, but tighten the springs at the back of the guitar to stop the bridge raising up nd putting your guitar out of tune
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#5
You shouldn't have to do anything too drastic the jump in gauge isn't that much.
#7
Riddle me this. I went from .42~.44 gauge strings to .56's, didn't have to adjust a single thing. Neck is straight as an arrow, action is perfect height and zero fret buzz.
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#8
Strong neck, probably. is that 10s to 12s?
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#9
Yeah, I'm not sure whether the originals were .9's or .10's. But the ones now are .12's.. I tune D standard, so it's not like I'm down in B or something...
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Last edited by `digitaL.braVo at Sep 23, 2008,
#10
That's not that big of a jump then. Every neck acts different, on guitar may only need only minor adjustment going from 9s to 12s and then some might need a whole new setup when going from 10s to 11s. Evaluate on a case by case basis. Floyds don't help either.
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#11
Hrm it just surprised me a lot, I figured it was pretty large? Lookin' to get a setup soon anyhow, bought this guitar in July from a girl who never played and have since not had it checked out... I'm cheap.
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#12
If the neck is straight and the action's good don't waste your money, just set the intonation and be done with it.
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#13
Thats the issue, no matter how hard I try the intonation is always wonkey, no matter how hard or long I've tried I just can't get it accurate.
Quote by sargasm
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#14
Poor bridge placement maybe. That is one case where money spent on a tech might be worth it, especially if can't seem to do it yourself.
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