#1
Do I use a chord progression with the major seventh or stick to a natural minor to accentuate the atonality of the major seventh?

It's been bugging me forever

Thanks.
hue
#3
you usually just use a chord that in a natural minor, would simply be a minor chord, but in a harmonic minor, it becomes major

for example, lets use A harmonic minor
E minor becomes E major, as the note G in the scale of A minor is changed to G# in A harmonic minor

so you use E major instead of E minor
in soloing, just make sure when an E major is being played, don't hit a G note, instead play a G#, it sounds wicked too

hopefully that was some help to you
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#4
^ good info!
but you can use a natural minor chord as well. For example: if you play an A harmonic minor over a D minor key, the seventh really pops! But then again, in this example the seventh of A harmonic minor is G# while the 4th of D minor is G so it is actually a-tonal, but still "sounds" good.


Now if you played A harmonic minor over A minor the 7th would be a-tonal but totaly do-able. You just gotta do it a bunch of times till you get a feel for it. You'll see this in bulgarian music a good bit.
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Last edited by ValoRhoads at Sep 23, 2008,
#5
Harmonic Minor would typically be used to create a progression such as Am G F E7; the first three chords come from A Natural Minor and E7 comes from A Harmonic Minor. One doesn't typically compose strictly in pure harmonic minor.
#6
There is no one right way to do anything in music.
Quote by H4T3BR33D3R
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#7
Quote by Exo M7
There is no one right way to do anything in music.
Yeah, there is. Trying to write a singing melody atonally is wrong. Trying to make direct m2's sound good is wrong. Repeating a single note (without any other note) and calling it a melody is wrong (and VERY common). Using a behringer amp/guitar is wrong.

Should I continue?
#8
Quote by demonofthenight
Yeah, there is. Trying to write a singing melody atonally is wrong. Trying to make direct m2's sound good is wrong. Repeating a single note (without any other note) and calling it a melody is wrong (and VERY common). Using a behringer amp/guitar is wrong.

Should I continue?



Actually I've played a behringer and it had one of the nicest feels to it that I've ever felt. Nice and light, good action, nice tone.

Weird shape... but still great to play.
hue
#9
ideally when you want a diatonic sound over an i iv V i progression (a minor one chord and a major 5 chord).
#10
Quote by bangoodcharlote
Harmonic Minor would typically be used to create a progression such as Am G F E7; the first three chords come from A Natural Minor and E7 comes from A Harmonic Minor. One doesn't typically compose strictly in pure harmonic minor.

Yeah. Harmonic minor and natural minor walk hand in hand when you're playing over a typical minor thing.
#11
Quote by Exo M7
There is no one right way to do anything in music.

+11111
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#12
harmonicly every dominant has to be a major so yea. but if you are not using the dominant for suspension (which is what you use it for) a regular b7 will sufice. if you are not composing a classical piece it is also appropriate to solo with with the natural.
#13
The harmonic minor scale was essentially created to derive a V chord from it. It's primary use is thus over a V chord. So really, the "traditional" way to go about it would be to stick to natural minor until you run into a V chord or variant of it. As for writing chords themselves, just about any v in a minor key can be substituted with a V, especially if it heads back to the i.
#14
+11111

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