#1
I've asked this to pretty much everyone involved in music that I know, and I haven't gotten enough answers either way to convince me. So, I give the question to you wise people. Will learning a genre, like jazz or blues, or anything really, make me any worse at another?
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Theory is descriptive, not prescriptive.


Quote by MiKe Hendryckz
theory states 1+1=2 sometimes in music 1+1=3.
#2
NO!!!!!!!!!!!

Unless you magically forget everything you've learned, picking up a new genre will only enhance your all around playing, and perhaps even introduce you to techniques that you can cross into your "normal" playing.
Mr. Allan wrote:
This is like saying you're not allowed to jerk off over the girl next door unless you have a license and written permission from her. Which, of course, is bullsh*t
#3
No. Usually it can mane you more diverse. it can add a cool touch if you can incorporate say something like blues or Jazz into a rock song or something.
it gives your own personal touch kinda thing
Now officially has too much gear to list

PM me if you want to know about my recording setup
#4
No, unless you stop practicing all the other genres only to practice one. An as said above, you can just mix styles toghether.
Rig:
MIM Fender Strat

Vox V847A Wah
Dunlop JH-F1 Fuzz Face
Boss DS-1
Ibanez Tube Screamer TS9 x2!!!
Boss Passive A/B Box
Boss BF-3 Flanger
Boss Volume Pedal

Marshall 4203 Artist 30Watt Tube
Epiphone Electar Tube 30
#5
This is what I think to, but I've heard, from a music teacher none the less, that learning jazz inhibits your ability to express yourself in blues.
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Theory is descriptive, not prescriptive.


Quote by MiKe Hendryckz
theory states 1+1=2 sometimes in music 1+1=3.
#6
Quote by The_Sophist
This is what I think to, but I've heard, from a music teacher none the less, that learning jazz inhibits your ability to express yourself in blues.


Not at all, learning jazz only enables you to apply it in blues!
Only if he's a blues purist, well then...
Rig:
MIM Fender Strat

Vox V847A Wah
Dunlop JH-F1 Fuzz Face
Boss DS-1
Ibanez Tube Screamer TS9 x2!!!
Boss Passive A/B Box
Boss BF-3 Flanger
Boss Volume Pedal

Marshall 4203 Artist 30Watt Tube
Epiphone Electar Tube 30
#7
Quote by The_Sophist
This is what I think to, but I've heard, from a music teacher none the less, that learning jazz inhibits your ability to express yourself in blues.


did they say that word for word? if so, that's pretty stupid... even if your harmonic vocabulary is severely extended due to excessive jazz learning ( ), you don't HAVE to draw upon it when playing blues... just like learning to speak more than language doesn't mean you constantly have to use them all... if you understand the idiom, you can play within it, regardless of what else you know

it's even more silly when you realise that jazz is basically rhythm & blues with extended harmonic and rhythmic vocabulary... it's an evolution of the blues in a certain direction

and many modern blues players draw upon elements of jazz... look at Joe Bonamassa... incorporating elements of jazz into his playing didn't exactly make him a worse blues player... and i'd be willing to bet the music teacher couldn't blow him off stage
out of here
Last edited by inflatablefilth at Sep 23, 2008,
#8
The music teacher is an extremely close minded musician. If you don't exclusively play classical you get no respect.
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Theory is descriptive, not prescriptive.


Quote by MiKe Hendryckz
theory states 1+1=2 sometimes in music 1+1=3.
#10
This is a teacher at school, I would never pay this moron.
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Theory is descriptive, not prescriptive.


Quote by MiKe Hendryckz
theory states 1+1=2 sometimes in music 1+1=3.
#11
^ i still say find a new teacher. i would ask administration at the school if there was another teacher that taught the same course. if this is high school then you might be SOL. but if it's college then yes, you are paying this moron and if you don't like his musical ideology then you shouldn't be paying for this moron (i wouldn't take a college course for music from a close minded teacher)
#12
It'll help you find your own "style".

EDIT: If this is a university or college, then maybe that's just the attitude of the people there, which I also disagree with. At my university, only "top" forms of music are respected, ie classical and jazz. Everything else is obviously crap . It sucks, but I listen to predominantly classical anyways, so I fit in .
Last edited by one vision at Sep 23, 2008,
#13
Quote by one vision
. At my university, only "top" forms of music are respected, ie classical and jazz.

i'd buy your mates a gigantic shoehorn for christmas..... to say one form is inherently "top" implies that the rest are "bottom" and there are several modern rock bands that prove you can be musically talented, original and diverse and still be popular. tool and NIN are 2 of them (seriously "march of the pigs" is in 29/8 time, probably compound but still a screwed up sig nonetheless)

if reznor and tool ever did an album it would be called "nine inch tool" and the world would laugh.
#14
Haha. Nine inch tool. I lol'd.

I think this elitist attitude comes about because most of the students are piano or string players, and they don't really play anything else but classical and jazz. Guitarists have a more open mind, in fact most of the guitarists here are metalheads.
#15
Learning a new genre may diminish your ability to play another.

For example, I am a hard rock and metal player. If I were to abandon that style of music and intensely focus on jazz, I would forget some of the metal knowledge, though it would come back eventually.

Think about school. Let's say that in 9th grade you study American History and in 10th grade you study African History. When you're intensely focusing on Africa, you're going to forget which General was in charge of the Korean War. You'll remember the Founding Fathers, Slavery, and WWII since those ideas are such a part of American society, but you'll forget about the more obscure ideas. I'm in college studying Math and Bio-Sciences; since I focus so intensely on those subjects, I've forgotten mostly everything I learned in high school aside from the basic skills: taking notes, studying, math, writing, et cetera. However, if I took a college class on American History, I would then remember the obscure ideas and that would cause me to recall ideas I thought I had forgotten, so you won't lose your ability to play a genre, but you'll be a little rusty at first.


So it is my opinion that you may temporarily diminish your ability in that scenario.
#16
^ i disagree highly, mainly because i haven't really focused on heavy metal for years but its still primarily what i play. and during the couple of times a month that i play on it, i never really seem to have any difficulties at all with it.
#17
Quote by z4twenny
^ i disagree highly, mainly because i haven't really focused on heavy metal for years but its still primarily what i play. and during the couple of times a month that i play on it, i never really seem to have any difficulties at all with it.
Have you intensely focused on something else that would "push your metal knowledge aside," so to speak?

I'm sure you listen to the music plenty, too.
#19
Quote by bangoodcharlote
Have you intensely focused on something else that would "push your metal knowledge aside," so to speak?

I'm sure you listen to the music plenty, too.

i've spread out what i've been trying to get better at over jazz,classical, flamenco type music, blues and bluegrass. i haven't specifically tried to get "better" at metal in i don't know how long. yes however, i do still listen to it quite often.
#21
I agree with BGC, but only when there are extreme differences between the new genre and your old one (their main techniques don't overlap much), and you focus exclusively on the new genre. For example, if a metal player got really into finger style, and focused on that intensely for a year. After this time, downpicking that master of puppets riff might take some getting back into.

In all other cases, no. Widening your horizons will, well, widen your horizons.
#22
I agree with what everyone has said. I am primarily a metal player...when I say primarily I mean I play in metal bands etc. I dont exclusively write metal music. But anyway....my incorporation of jazz stylings into my metal songs has only made everything sound 10 times better. Especially lead playing. Learning different styles can only help you. And anyway, why would you want to limit what styles you can play on the guitar. Its no fun if you are like, 'ok I like jazz, but I cant really take it any further or my playing will start getting too jazzy' etc etc. Embrace all different styles and make them your own. When you are playing metal or whatever you can draw upon all these different influences and let them shine in your playing.

Again, a pointer on jazz. Like everyone else has said you really can do no wrong learning jazz. The thoery aspect alone will make you a much better player. Also, if you are wanting to get into improvisation properly, its THE music to study lol
Andy