#1
Ok, here's the problem. My guitar will be in perfect tune. When I play chords with the high e open it sounds fine. But whenever I fret the high e whateverr note I'm on it's out of tune. But when I play it open it's perfectly in tune again. what the hell?
Barf

Fender 70's reissue strat
Laney 120 mxd
Morley bad horsie 2
#2
when you're fretting the high E note? your intonation is out of whack, there should be some instructions around here or elsewhere on the internet to learn how to fix it, or you can get someone else (like a guitar tech at a music store) to fix it for you.
#4
how old are your strings? Old strings will go out of tune or double up on notes, that sounds like what's going on
"To me it seems pretty straightforward. There are two opinions one can have about freedom of speech, you're for it or against it." - Tom Morello


Shackled Our Minds When You're Bent on the Cross... When Ignorance Reigns, Life is Lost
#5
It seems like it's definately your intonation
Quote by gun4hire
ugh, you cant rape someone with a pineapple because that would assume that someone doesnt want to have sex with a pineapple, which is impossible


Quote by Jackal58
Ignorance of the law is no excuse.
Especially an ignorant law.
#7
With your thread title, I thought this would be about your orientation, rather than intonation ...
#8
Quote by Steve BP
With your thread title, I thought this would be about your orientation, rather than intonation ...


lol. Sigged.

EDIT: damn, too long.
Quote by patriotplayer90
Lolz that guy is a noob.

Egnater
Leave it on the press, Depress Depress Taboot Taboot.
Last edited by Jhachey22 at Sep 24, 2008,
#9
SETTING INTONATION: from icepoint...
Most electric guitars provide individual string length adjustment for setting intonation. Fine tuning this length insures that your guitar plays in tune all the way up and down the neck.

Using an electronic tuner, tune your guitar to pitch.
One string at a time, play the harmonic at the 12th fret and then play the fretted 12th fret note.
If the fretted note is sharper than the harmonic, increase the string length slightly until both notes register the same on your tuner.
If the fretted note is flat compared to the harmonic shorten the string length slightly until both notes register the same on your tuner.
Repeat the procedure on all strings until the harmonic and the fretted notes are the same.

if you cant get the harmonic then compare the open string to the fretted 12th.
and retune the open string after every screw adjustment.

repost guitar type if you dont know where your intonation screws are.
Jenneh

Quote by TNfootballfan62
Jenny needs to sow her wild oats with random Gibsons and Taylors she picks up in bars before she settles down with a PRS.


Set up Questions? ...Q & A Thread

Recognised by the Official EG/GG&A/GB&C WTLT Lists 2011