#1
I know many guitarist use delay for solos, but do most of them use some kind of delay or slapback delay for their usual rhythm parts for verses and choruses and such?
#3
so most blues rock and metal bands dont use delay for basecally anything more than solos or special effect?
#4
Delay, echo, and reverb are three terms that don't mean the same thing, but are often used as if they do. Please describe the sound in question and then I will be able to help you.

Is it the ECHO-ECHo-ECho-Echo-echo sound you're thinking of?
#5
Im just thinking when bands play power chord riffs do they usually use anything other than reverb?
#6
Quote by guns_rosesldb
Im just thinking when bands play power chord riffs do they usually use anything other than reverb?
No. Do you think their recordings sound like they recorded in a tunnel?

Echo and Delay (they're the same thing) will be very obvious to spot. The beginning of GNR's "Welcome to the Jungle" makes heavy use of echo, and it's quite obvious.

What's really hard is keeping the echo in time with the rest of the band.
#7
^ actually live depending on the size of the venue a band may use a pinch of delay to fill out the notes (and i do mean a tiny tiny amount with a very very short delay) in larger venues like stadiums they genrally dont (unless a specific part calls for it and delay was obviously in the original recording) and in very very tiny venues they might use some reverb to fill out the sound. normally however in your standard bar that has live bands the bar is big enough to provide natural reverb (which is infinitely better)

i do know that my friend swears by a touch of delay and reverb for all recordings if you're not recording an instrument multi mic'ed in a big room (and most home recording artists don't have this luxury)
#8
Live is a completely different issue and I know nothing about that aside from plugging my guitar into a tubescreamer when I played (on a regular basis) at a dive bar.