#1
Hey all,

So my acoustic has a couple things wrong with it. Mainly, the neck is in an up-bend and is in need of a neck reset. The top of the guitar is bellied at the bridge, and, due to the neck, the fretboard extension pressed down on the guitar top and caused it to bend downwards - so it's pretty much bowed at both ends, both ways - up and down. The saddle was filed, like, REALLY low by the previous owner in a vain attempt to help with the action - and some of the strings come straight out of the bridge pins and don't touch the saddle at all!

Could anyone give me a vague repair price? Ideally, I want a perfectly straight neck, perfectly flat top, and the saddle really high, but still with a nice action.

#2
if you actually need that neck reset then it could cost upwards of at least $150 i would imagine. Since there's more to fix than that then expect it to be at least $200+
Equipment:
- Art & Lutherie Cedar CW (SOLD! )
- Martin D-16RGT w/ LR Baggs M1 Active Soundhole Pickup
- Seagull 25th Anniversary Flame Maple w/ LR Baggs Micro EQ

Have an acoustic guitar? Don't let your guitar dry out! Click here.
#3
Is there edge binding on the sides of the fretboard? If not, are the fret ends sticking out and feel sharp? I ask because you gave a hint as to why all of this could be happening, the bellying up of the soundboard at the bridge. This is a classic example of a guitar allowed to dry out beyond it's normal range. You may or may not be able to remedy some of the problems by humidifying it. It's going to take time and patience, but it may bring the guitar back into shape. You need a hardshell case to store it in and an acoustic guitar humidifier, such as the Planet Waves one that goes in between the strings to humidify the interior.
I would say it could take upwards of a month of constant humidity to get the wood supple again. I would also try this first before anything else as it could bring the guitar back to life enough that you won't need near the amount of work you feel you need now, like the neck reset.
A lot of times tho, once a guitar has gotten to this point, they just can't recover the same geometry they once had when the wood had the correct moisture content, so playability issues are going to be forever present. It's at least worth a shot and is a very inexpensive way to start out.
#4
No, the frets don't feel sharp at the edges at all. But, as for the humidifier/case, that sounds good. Not sure what it'll do for the "damage", if you know what I mean, but if you say it'll help then I'm willing to do it.

One question: if I leave it in a case, for a month, with the humidifer, do I have to loosen the strings so it has some freedom?

#5
Quote by EJD
No, the frets don't feel sharp at the edges at all. But, as for the humidifier/case, that sounds good. Not sure what it'll do for the "damage", if you know what I mean, but if you say it'll help then I'm willing to do it.

One question: if I leave it in a case, for a month, with the humidifer, do I have to loosen the strings so it has some freedom?



One month shouldn't be a problem. You can still play the guitar. Just put it back in the case with the humidifier when you're done.
Equipment:
- Art & Lutherie Cedar CW (SOLD! )
- Martin D-16RGT w/ LR Baggs M1 Active Soundhole Pickup
- Seagull 25th Anniversary Flame Maple w/ LR Baggs Micro EQ

Have an acoustic guitar? Don't let your guitar dry out! Click here.
#6
Gotcha. I'll let you know how I get on, but it might be a while till I can get a case and humidifier as I'm saving for a tiny, quarter-size electric Les Paul style