#1
Hi.

I'm learning the minor scale and I have learned it pretty good in the key of A.
I haven't learned lots of shapes, I just memorized the notes on the fretboard.

What is the best/easiest way to learn it in other keys?
Should I learn to "move it", learn the shapes or just memorize all the notes again, like I did with the key of A?

And what key should I learn next? A key thats close to A, like G or B? Maybe Ab or Bb and then just do all the keys one by one?


Thank you.
#2
you're doing a really good thing by learning the notes of the scale, which is something a lot of people don't do at first (including me). This way you really know where the root is, and what other notes you're playing so it'll be easier to play over a chord progression. It's much harder than learning the patterns and moving them, however, the patterns will become engrained on their own, while you actually know what you're doing. I'd recommend learning all the modes with their notes, and from there move on to different keys. From there build onto it by learning the major scale and it's modes, which will be easy since a major scale only adds notes to the pentatonics (which is what i'm assuming you meant by minor scales, the pentatonic minor)
Last edited by SZ320man at Sep 25, 2008,
#3
No, not the pentatonic minor, the "regular" minor. Don't know what it's called in English.

The major scale is "the same" as the minor, right?
I know the A minor scale then I also know the C major scale?
#4
The A minor scale and C major scale contain the same notes, so if you can play the patterns for one you can do it for the other. The scales differ greatly in function, however.
#5
^ yep. Any natural minor scale contains the same notes as the major scale 3 frets up.

You should be able to move both the shapes and know the notes. That way when one fails you won't sound like a tool.
#6
Oh, my bad. Then you're learning the nat. minor scale, which is the Aeolian (6th) mode of the major scale... learn the major scale, dorian (2nd) mode, which is also minor, and phrygian mode, you'll use these the most. The lydian and mixolydian imo are different plays on the major scale, and the locrian is diminished, different but kinda cool. The hardest part about learning these in different keys is starting back around the beginning of the fretboard... you'll be fine tho
#7
Quote by SZ320man
Oh, my bad. Then you're learning the nat. minor scale, which is the Aeolian (6th) mode of the major scale... learn the major scale, dorian (2nd) mode, which is also minor, and phrygian mode, you'll use these the most. The lydian and mixolydian imo are different plays on the major scale, and the locrian is diminished, different but kinda cool. The hardest part about learning these in different keys is starting back around the beginning of the fretboard... you'll be fine tho
No no no.

You should learn in the following order, or this is at least how I would teach if I had a student:
1. Minor Pentatonic/Blues, but not the theory...just patterns so the student can to show off to friends
2. The major scale and basic theory (intervals, CoF, etc)
3. The theory behind #1
4. Modes, Harmonic and Melodic Minor and their modes, other weird stuff

Don't even think about modes until you understand basic theory and the major scale and have learned them properly, as in not just how they pertain to the guitar.

#8
Quote by Warlock_
Hi.

I'm learning the minor scale and I have learned it pretty good in the key of A.
I haven't learned lots of shapes, I just memorized the notes on the fretboard.

What is the best/easiest way to learn it in other keys?
Should I learn to "move it", learn the shapes or just memorize all the notes again, like I did with the key of A?

And what key should I learn next? A key thats close to A, like G or B? Maybe Ab or Bb and then just do all the keys one by one?


Thank you.


learn the shapes..... move them around. be aware what the notes are in each new key.

btw, don't be in a rush to learn every single key and every single scale. You just learned the minor scale ....... great now make some music with it. Don't move on until you can apply what you just learned in a musical setting.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Sep 25, 2008,
#9
Quote by bangoodcharlote
No no no.

You should learn in the following order, or this is at least how I would teach if I had a student:
1. Minor Pentatonic/Blues, but not the theory...just patterns so the student can to show off to friends
2. The major scale and basic theory (intervals, CoF, etc)
3. The theory behind #1
4. Modes, Harmonic and Melodic Minor and their modes, other weird stuff

Don't even think about modes until you understand basic theory and the major scale and have learned them properly, as in not just how they pertain to the guitar.



Good points... although I had a lot of problems with knowing only patterns, without the notes behind them... could just be me though. Good point on saving modes for last, now that I think back, I had a hell of a problem learning them, even though they're not that complicated
#10
Quote by SZ320man
Good points... although I had a lot of problems with knowing only patterns, without the notes behind them... could just be me though. Good point on saving modes for last, now that I think back, I had a hell of a problem learning them, even though they're not that complicated


thats what happens when you learn too much, too soon. You kinda sorta understand them, but then again not really (or not completely anyway).

alot of people are eager to learn everything, but often forget about taking the time to apply what they learn musically, and to build their knowledge base 1 step at a time in logical order.
shred is gaudy music
#11
Yeah that's pretty much how it went, trying to cram it all in at once. I think I took one day to try and master modes, which was pretty dumb. I also had this weird obsession with trying to shred when I couldn't, all that happened was my hand got tired, and it sounded like crap. I've got a bit more patience these days...
#12
Quote by bangoodcharlote
No no no.

You should learn in the following order, or this is at least how I would teach if I had a student:
1. Minor Pentatonic/Blues, but not the theory...just patterns so the student can to show off to friends
2. The major scale and basic theory (intervals, CoF, etc)
3. The theory behind #1
4. Modes, Harmonic and Melodic Minor and their modes, other weird stuff

Don't even think about modes until you understand basic theory and the major scale and have learned them properly, as in not just how they pertain to the guitar.



I know some theory. I know intervals, CoF, minor and major scale and how to create chords.

I know nothing about modes, should I start to look at them?
#13
If you know everything else, then yea go for it, there's a pretty good article on this site about them (Modes II) they open up the fretboard for you, and are good about getting you 'out of the box'. Like ^ said though, take it slow
#14
Quote by SZ320man
Yeah that's pretty much how it went, trying to cram it all in at once. I think I took one day to try and master modes, which was pretty dumb. I also had this weird obsession with trying to shred when I couldn't, all that happened was my hand got tired, and it sounded like crap. I've got a bit more patience these days...


Patience and humility will help you go a long way, mate.
#15
Quote by Freepower
Patience and humility will help you go a long way, mate.


Very good point. I've focused more on good warmups, exercises, learning theory than just plugging in and hacking away at it. I've noticed a big difference in the fluidity of my playing in just a short time