#1
Well I'm playing a song at my church again.

but they gave me the piano music....
I'm not the best at transposing music from instrument to instrument... at all.

The song is in F.

the first note is: A and C chord. Not a triad. Then A and F, then C and A
I think... Don't read treble clef that well (i play mainly trombone. which is bass clef.)


Heres the link to the Music.

its a Direct scan so its like mega huge.

http://i94.photobucket.com/albums/l99/Rocknrollcows/CCI00000-1.jpg

EDIT:

oh yea, forgot to say... I'm transposing it to GUITAR.
#2
Play the A and C chord then A and F then C and A. I fail to see the problem.

Just read the notes slowly and figure out what's going on. You're not sight reading; you can take your time and go through the "every good boy does fine" stuff.
#3
not familiar with the "every good boy does fine" thing...

and i thought the guitar had to be played like an octave down or something???
#4
hey if you can read bass cleff well than you can read treble cleff pretty well to

treble is 2 notes higer than bass cleff

eg a D on the bass cleff which is the middle line in the same spot on the treble cleff would be B, also the middle line
#5
Quote by Rocknrollcows
not familiar with the "every good boy does fine" thing...
The lines are, ascending, E, G, B, D, and F. The spaces are, also ascending, F, A, C, and E.

and i thought the guitar had to be played like an octave down or something???
You play an octave higher actually, but that isn't all that important. If the score says to play an F chord, just play an F chord.
#6
"and i thought the guitar had to be played like an octave down or something??? "

A bit confusing, if you play from the piano score as if it was written as a standard guitar score then yes, you will sound an octave lower than if a piano played the same score.

Standard middle C is 1st fret second string on the guitar.

But BGC is right, just go ahead and play it anyway, ignore the fact that the guitar will transpose it an octave. Unless you have to be careful your voicing doesn't get in the way of another instrument (unlikely) then it won't really matter.
Last edited by R.Christie at Sep 26, 2008,
#7
Hymn style 4 part harmony does not lend itself well to the guitar. The best thing to do would be to work out what chord each note is and just play those chords in the regular open guitar shapes, but it'll be tricky because the chords change pretty much every note. The next best thing would be to play just the top and bottom lines. Don't forget the bass clef line is part of the music as well - that first chord for example is an F major chord. As for the actual transposing part, sorry I don't have that much free time just now :\

Edit: Just being a little anal, but the word really is transcribe or orchestrate. Transposing is changing the key of something.
Last edited by shigidab0p at Sep 26, 2008,