#1
Well, I was just looking at my technique and it sucks. It's not that it's bad all the time, I think it might be because this guitar is a little too heavy.

Ok, I bought this guitar without ever playing it off of Musicians Friend's website. (Terrible choice) Now I realize that this guitar (Kramer Striker FR 422-SM) is no bigger than a Strat but, it weighs as much as a Les Paul! After about 1/2 and hour it gets to feeling very heavy and it makes me VERY uncomfortable.

Could it really be that the weight of this guitar is promoting tension in my muscles?

Another question: What does this time sig. mean: 6/8+2/4 and how would I count it?
#2
I guess its probably easier said as

5/4 or 10/8 phrased as Sww Mww Sw Mw, or for simplicity a 5/4 far bar phrased as bar of 6/8 and a bar of 2/4

A 6/8 time signature is a compound time signature, which means, instead of the beats being straight notes, un-dotted, they are dotted values, a dot on the end of a note, adds half the value of the note, to the note

6/8 is classed as coumpound duple, to dotted crothcet, so its phrased SwwMww

2/4 is a time signature in which the beat values are quater notes, there are two of them, so this time signature is classed as simple duple.

You could count both time signatures together, as 10

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Placing the accents on 1 4 7 and 9

Or you could count it 1 2 3 4 5 6 for the 6/8 bar, and 1 2 3 4 for the 2/4 bar.

Counting like this your counting in 8th notes.

Anyone else to confirm that? Or deny that
Last edited by Galvanise69 at Sep 25, 2008,
#3
How low is the guitar hanging? I'd start by shortening the strap until it's at least waist height or higher. As for the time signatures: 6/8 is a compound time signature, which means it uses a dotted note as the beat unit. It consists of two beats per bar, with each beat having a duration of three eighth notes, or a dotted quarter note. You would count it...

One two three One two three

2/4 is a simple time signature and consists of two quarter notes per bar. You could count it...

One two One two etc.

5/4 or 10/8 phrased as Sww Mww Mw Mw, or for simplicity a 5/4 far bar phrased as bar of 6/8 and a bar of 2/4

Anyone else to confirm that? Or deny that


I'd be weary of "de-subdividing" a time signature unless you're familiar with the song. Alternating bars of 6/8 and 2/4 may very well better describe the beat than 5/4. I have plenty of music that I've notated as alternating bars of 5/4 and 3/4 simply because it better describes the music.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
Last edited by Archeo Avis at Sep 25, 2008,
#5
Quote by The.new.guy
I know how to count in 6/8 and how to count in 2/4 but the time sig. says "6/8+2/4" how do I count that =S


I'd count it One - and - uh Two - and -uh Three - and Four - and

I don't think this is any different from what G-man and Archeo are saying, but you asked for just the counting
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#6
I'd agree with above, it works. Some flamenco compass use that counting scheme or equivalent (I think)
- are you referring to a published score? If so then you ought to be able to identify it from the notation.

[Aside

6 3
8 4

Is also reasonably common and can refer to either the two meters occurring simultaneously in different voices, or sequentially.]
Last edited by R.Christie at Sep 27, 2008,
#7
It means you need to work out. My guns arent even legal in Canada yet.
Wut.
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#8
Quote by The.new.guy
I know how to count in 6/8 and how to count in 2/4 but the time sig. says "6/8+2/4" how do I count that =S

Whenever i've seen that it means that first you play a bar of 6/8 then a bar of 2/4 but it is all contained in one bar. So this bar would actually contain 10 quavers but it would be played like one bar of 6/8 then one of 2/4.

So you would probably count it like this:

1 2 3 4 5 6 1 2 3 4 (with each beat being a quaver)

or if you like

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

The reason the writer has written it with this time signature is that he wants you to stress these beats, so try to imagine that you are playing a bar of each for every bar written.
#9
Quote by R.Christie
I'd agree with above, it works. Some flamenco compass use that counting scheme or equivalent (I think)
- are you referring to a published score? If so then you ought to be able to identify it from the notation.

[Aside

6 3
8 4

Is also reasonably common and can refer to either the two meters occurring simultaneously in different voices, or sequentially.]


it's almost the same except for the difference that a flamenco compas(the 3/4 measures I mean) has 12 beats instead of ten.
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