#1
As the title suggests, I changed my strings for the very 1st time. A pretty daunting experience for a newbie like me. Took a grand total for 3 hours LOL. Obviously i messed up and most of the strings hardly went more then 2 rounds around the tuning pegs, though I'm pretty sure they would hold up since i have played on the new strings for a while. Obviously I'm gonna try and do a better job the next time.
Now there seems to be lots of excess string hanging around the tuning head. Do you guys completely cut off the excess and make it look like an almost new guitar? or do you guys just snap off most of it but leave a little lying around.
Oh and share your first string changing experiences.
#2
lol im sure u did a better job than me the first time. i usually cut it all off or leave a little bit watevertakes my fancy. My botom E string is the original string it had on when i bort the guitar - 4 years ago lol.
#3
I leave the excess string on for a bit just till the guitar is properly staying in tune then i cut the excess off............no need for it and it looks untidy. I messed up my first string change but im that used to it now, that it gets done in under a minute.
#4
First time I had my strings changed I took it to the guitar shop and they charged me £40

The next time I needed them changing I decided to pay £4.20 for the strings and I did it myself, didn't go too badly until I accidentally snapped 3 of the strings
#5
good stuff, welcome to the lame world of changing strings. i hate changing strings. defenently cut off the ends, it looks so gay with them still on
#6
The first time i changed the strings on my acoustic electric i had some problems with it. Previously i had had a classical guitar for which the strings would wound on the bridge. This one has bridge pins, which i had never messed with before. It took me a while to get the low E peg out (maybe 20 min?). After that one i got the hang of it and did it like nothing except that i accidentally put the A string on the low E spot and i had already cut off the excess string. This happened cuz it was the first time i used D'addario's and they all come in the same pack and are only color-coded at the ball at the end. I accidentally confused the bronze and golden ball thingies hence the wrong string. So... i had to take it out, put the old A string and leave it on... to make things worse, the bridge pin flew away when i was tuning the D string because of the tension. I looked for about 10 min (i was at work) but couldn't find it, only to realize that it was on top of the guitar bag that my acoustic was resting on while i was changing the strings.

BTW: this was last month, yet i've been playing for 4 years.

ON TOPIC: on acoustics, i cut off the excess string... on electrics however, i wound ALL of the string.
Originally Posted by evening_crow
Quoting yourself is cool.


WARNING: I kill threads.
#7
You can do whatever with the excess strings, I leave them on now, but use a pair of wirecutters and lean them against the tuning head peg and cut th string so its like the excess is as long as the tuning peg.

It's hard for me to put into words, and it's early, but I hope you got what I'm saying
Peavey 6505+
Fender Hot Rod Deville 410
Fender Telecaster Blacktop
Gretsch G5120
#8
I usually cut it off all the way to the tuning head. you can do whatever you want though. some people curl it up cuz they think it looks cool. haha. 3 hours isnt bad. my first change took 2 hours and i ended up snapping my new low E string because I overtightened it without realizing.
Equipment:
- Art & Lutherie Cedar CW (SOLD! )
- Martin D-16RGT w/ LR Baggs M1 Active Soundhole Pickup
- Seagull 25th Anniversary Flame Maple w/ LR Baggs Micro EQ

Have an acoustic guitar? Don't let your guitar dry out! Click here.
#9
Quote by Thepoison92
First time I had my strings changed I took it to the guitar shop and they charged me £40

The next time I needed them changing I decided to pay £4.20 for the strings and I did it myself, didn't go too badly until I accidentally snapped 3 of the strings


jesus!!!! pricey!!!
#10
Quote by captivate
I usually cut it off all the way to the tuning head. you can do whatever you want though. some people curl it up cuz they think it looks cool. haha. 3 hours isnt bad. my first change took 2 hours and i ended up snapping my new low E string because I overtightened it without realizing.


lol wow...
#11
Quote by Thepoison92
First time I had my strings changed I took it to the guitar shop and they charged me £40

The next time I needed them changing I decided to pay £4.20 for the strings and I did it myself, didn't go too badly until I accidentally snapped 3 of the strings



omg.....i could buy almost a year's supply of strings for that price!
#12
Quote by avenger86
lol wow...


and to think. that was only a year and a half ago. I'm definitely a lot more guitar smart than back then.
Equipment:
- Art & Lutherie Cedar CW (SOLD! )
- Martin D-16RGT w/ LR Baggs M1 Active Soundhole Pickup
- Seagull 25th Anniversary Flame Maple w/ LR Baggs Micro EQ

Have an acoustic guitar? Don't let your guitar dry out! Click here.
#13
lol yea, there is so much to learn. That's what makes it fun though. yAnd your equipment list really makes me GAS work up =D
#14
Haha. My GAS is going as well. gonna get an electric next. Thinking about a Gibson LP double cut.
Equipment:
- Art & Lutherie Cedar CW (SOLD! )
- Martin D-16RGT w/ LR Baggs M1 Active Soundhole Pickup
- Seagull 25th Anniversary Flame Maple w/ LR Baggs Micro EQ

Have an acoustic guitar? Don't let your guitar dry out! Click here.
#15
Length to wind takes some practice. I think I get roughly two fat fingers under the string at the fretboard before backbending and wrapping it. That gets me 1.5 to 2.5 turns. It is not a huge deal on the wound strings if you wrap them correctly. The B and E strings need another turn or two.

Once I get the guitar fully tuned up, I snip the excess even with the top of the post.

After that, I'll usually play them in or if I am in a hurry, I'll stretch each string 1" above the 12th fret for a few seconds.
#16
In regards to the excess string I usually cut it so it looks like it just came out of the shop. Bit of a perfectionist, I leave about 5mm of string, sometimes less. Usualy cut them after I've tuned my guitar.

Changing strings still takes a while for me, but I like to take my time and give my fretboard a good clean whilst I'm at it. Just becasue i have a cheap guitar, doesn't mean I can let it get all dirty :P
Quote by Renka
OddOneOut is an Essex S&M mistress and not a pirate or a computer program.

#17
Quote by captivate
Haha. My GAS is going as well. gonna get an electric next. Thinking about a Gibson LP double cut.


Woah, you have a cabinet to store all those guitars or something? and dude, you sure are rich lol
#18
Quote by OddOneOut
In regards to the excess string I usually cut it so it looks like it just came out of the shop. Bit of a perfectionist, I leave about 5mm of string, sometimes less. Usualy cut them after I've tuned my guitar.

Changing strings still takes a while for me, but I like to take my time and give my fretboard a good clean whilst I'm at it. Just becasue i have a cheap guitar, doesn't mean I can let it get all dirty :P


Now that's a good idea, I should give my fretboard some cleaning when I next change my strings.
#19
Realistically I hate to say it but You should change your strings at least every two weeks, but when you do make sure you do clean the fret board cause all that finger grime does build up and effect sound especially on the High E string I usually give my guitar a good polish too at the same time as its easier to clean round by the soundhole bit of a perfectionist too, also I think I might set up a business changing strings for newbies at £40 a pop, thats ridiculous
#20
Quote by benjo48
lol im sure u did a better job than me the first time. i usually cut it all off or leave a little bit watevertakes my fancy. My botom E string is the original string it had on when i bort the guitar - 4 years ago lol.

That's rank man, change it! For TS, I recommend you cut them off leaving a couple of mm sticking out of the machine head. This is so the strings don't get in the way or catch on stuff, and if they slip a little they won't come undone. It also looks a lot neater.

Edit: Wait for the strings to settle before cutting them though.
Last edited by shigidab0p at Sep 28, 2008,
#21
Lots of good advice here, thanks. And I suddenly remember something that I have always wanted to ask, does it matter whether i turn the turning pegs clockwise/anti clockwise when I'm restringing my guitar? I have seen website that advocate turning anticlockwise to tighten the strings, but there are also websites that says to turn clockwise.
So, is it just a matter of preference?
#22
Changed my strings around for the very first time a few weeks ago too. Protip: Buy multiple sets of strings in case you mess up xD I ended up winding up the high E too fast or too tight or I don't know, anyway it snapped off, slingshotting the peg across the room (my room isn't very neat so it took me over an hour to find it). In addition I had to re-use the E-string I already took off xD

Thinking about trying 0.10's next time instead of 0.12, and I'm not going with D'addario anymore either. I had martins before this and I liked them better
#23
Quote by avenger86
Lots of good advice here, thanks. And I suddenly remember something that I have always wanted to ask, does it matter whether i turn the turning pegs clockwise/anti clockwise when I'm restringing my guitar? I have seen website that advocate turning anticlockwise to tighten the strings, but there are also websites that says to turn clockwise.
So, is it just a matter of preference?


It sorta matters. It probably won't hurt if you do it wrong, but there's a reason why it's done one specific way. If you'll look at the picture below, the string is winded from the inside out. Why is it this way? Because by winding it from the inside out, there is less of an angle at the nut. The more acute the angle is in reference to the nut, the more it will bind on the nut when you tune. That's not a good thing. Keeping the strings at an angle closer to being straight helps you tune better because the string doesn't catch on the nut.





Quote by Azunaii
Changed my strings around for the very first time a few weeks ago too. Protip: Buy multiple sets of strings in case you mess up xD I ended up winding up the high E too fast or too tight or I don't know, anyway it snapped off, slingshotting the peg across the room (my room isn't very neat so it took me over an hour to find it). In addition I had to re-use the E-string I already took off xD

Thinking about trying 0.10's next time instead of 0.12, and I'm not going with D'addario anymore either. I had martins before this and I liked them better


I wouldn't go for anything lighter than .011's. My reason is because thicker strings tend to stay in tune better. When you press down on the strings too hard, lighter strings tend to play out of tune more often. Thicker strings also give more sustain in my experience. It's personal preference, but staying with 11's or higher is my suggestion.

As for winding up the strings, just make sure you have the other hand pressing down gently on the bridge pin when the strings start to become taut.
Equipment:
- Art & Lutherie Cedar CW (SOLD! )
- Martin D-16RGT w/ LR Baggs M1 Active Soundhole Pickup
- Seagull 25th Anniversary Flame Maple w/ LR Baggs Micro EQ

Have an acoustic guitar? Don't let your guitar dry out! Click here.
#24
I leave about a half an inch on there.

My first change took about 2 hours, I watched a youtube video on how to do it so it was pretty easy, though it took a while. I changed them for the second time last night, took about 45 minutes, I'm getting better! haha. It wouldn't of been as long if I had a string winder, that probably took up for most of the time.

Maybe it's just me, but I love changing strings, it's fun. haha.
#25
Quote by skatefreestyle
I leave about a half an inch on there.

My first change took about 2 hours, I watched a youtube video on how to do it so it was pretty easy, though it took a while. I changed them for the second time last night, took about 45 minutes, I'm getting better! haha. It wouldn't of been as long if I had a string winder, that probably took up for most of the time.

Maybe it's just me, but I love changing strings, it's fun. haha.

Nah, same here. I find it really relaxing for some reason. Plus it gives me a chance to go ahead and clean my fretboard and the space between pickups that's under the strings. It'll also give me a chance to clean the pickups a bit better.

What annoys me is how some ppl can do it in just a couple of minutes while it takes me at least 30 minutes or so. I guess it's my fault for being a perfectionist and for winding the entire strings (except on acoustics; on those i wind about 3 times and cut off the rest). Then again, my guitars look better than my other guitarist's. I remember we once changed strings before a show and he had about 6 inches of strings sticking out at the neck.

Needless to say, we tried to stay away from him in fear of getting our eyes poked out.
Originally Posted by evening_crow
Quoting yourself is cool.


WARNING: I kill threads.
#26
Ah thanks for explaining why winding it one way is better then the other. I wounded them all by turning clockwise, so i guess I got it wrong for the low E side then. Should i take out the strings and fix it? Or can I just leave them there and fix it the next time i change my strings (probably in a month's time or so)
#27
Just leave it till the next time. It shouldn't pose much of a problem at all.
Equipment:
- Art & Lutherie Cedar CW (SOLD! )
- Martin D-16RGT w/ LR Baggs M1 Active Soundhole Pickup
- Seagull 25th Anniversary Flame Maple w/ LR Baggs Micro EQ

Have an acoustic guitar? Don't let your guitar dry out! Click here.