#1
So I have been searching for this through the search option on this site and used google but I couldn't find something else then the 1234 spider exercises etc.
So I'm looking for exercises which you can always play with a metronome. Of course I could stick to playing songs with it but I'd like to have a nice vocabulaire of exercises so I can improve my playing anytime
Quote by razorback91
Im sorry, I just don't see how you could argue that hardcore isn't metal. That just seems arrogant to me.

Yes, its its own kind of metal, but its still metal.
#3
Simply use chromatics to begin with an assending/decsending '1234321234321etc...' pattern....set the beat at a very slow tempo like 66bmp and play 1 note per beat, then 2, then 3, and finally 4 notes per beat. From there you can sub- divide each beat further if u wish, play 8 notes per beat, 16, and 32. This is a fantastic way of building up your accuracy at a high speed. When you have properly mastered the tempo your at increase the beat by around 8bmp at a time. hope this help's in some way. Also, if u havent already, watch Freepower's video lesson on 'finger independance' as it kinda goes hand in hand with this.
#4
Remember that their are 24 different combinations of the "1,2,3,4" chromatics; getting your fingers used to them all will greatly improve your playing vocabulary.

Then you could move on to playing - for want of a better description - 3-note-per-string chromatics: E1-3-5, A1-3-5, D1-3-5, G1-3-5 etc.

The next stage might be moving frets playing these patterns. Eg: E1-3-2-4, D3-5-4-6, A2-4-3-5, G4-6-5-7 etc. (Hopefully you can see where I'm going with that)

The next thing would be to apply all of these movements into proper scales over the whole fretboard.
#5
I don't get it. You can practice ANYTHING to a metronome. Why would you think
there's some specific exercises -- like these chromatic or spider ones? I think it's
only because you have a limited view of what the metronome is about that you see it
in these terms. To me it seems like kind of a nonsense question.
#6
With anything you mean parts of songs. And sometimes I don't know what to play and want to stick with an certain exercise which is useful.
Quote by razorback91
Im sorry, I just don't see how you could argue that hardcore isn't metal. That just seems arrogant to me.

Yes, its its own kind of metal, but its still metal.
#7
Play the C major scale all over the neck until you can cleanly play 16th notes at 200 bpm (go faster if you can). You should also try the "Cliffs of Dover" string-skipping lick to improve your string skipping.

For legato, play the C major scale with hammer-ons and pull-offs rather than strict alternate picking.

Sweeping: Sweep up, then down, then up and down, a standard Am barre chord at fret 5.


You should set your goal to be able to play all of these exercises as 16th notes at 200 bpm, but push yourself further if you desire (16ths at 200 is really fast).
#8
Quote by 08L1V10N
With anything you mean parts of songs. And sometimes I don't know what to play and want to stick with an certain exercise which is useful.


Well, anything that's "useful" without a metronome isn't any less useful with one.
In fact it' probably more useful.

The idea isn't to acquire "metronome skill". It's to get the feel and ability to play to
a steady beat. After all, most music is played that way.

If I'm practicing scales or technique where I have already acquired enough muscle
memory to know where my fingers are supposed to go, I just turn on my metronome
or drums and practice to it. I've never had the the thought to question whether it
was a "metronome exercise" or not. (BTW, A good time NOT to use a metronome is
when you're just learning where your fingers need to go. You to need to focus and
think on that w/o the pressure of playing in time.)

If I'm practicing a song vs doing exercises I'll use the metronome in different ways,
but if I have one around I'll almost always just turn it on and leave it on while
practicing.
#9
Quote by bangoodcharlote
Play the C major scale all over the neck until you can cleanly play 16th notes at 200 bpm (go faster if you can). You should also try the "Cliffs of Dover" string-skipping lick to improve your string skipping.

For legato, play the C major scale with hammer-ons and pull-offs rather than strict alternate picking.

Sweeping: Sweep up, then down, then up and down, a standard Am barre chord at fret 5.


You should set your goal to be able to play all of these exercises as 16th notes at 200 bpm, but push yourself further if you desire (16ths at 200 is really fast).


Thanks. skipping strings w/ 16th notes at 120bpm is already hard for me lol
Quote by razorback91
Im sorry, I just don't see how you could argue that hardcore isn't metal. That just seems arrogant to me.

Yes, its its own kind of metal, but its still metal.
#10
Quote by 08L1V10N
Thanks. skipping strings w/ 16th notes at 120bpm is already hard for me lol
Don't feel bad. Skipping is probably the hardest technique on the guitar.
#11
Quote by 08L1V10N
So I have been searching for this through the search option on this site and used google but I couldn't find something else then the 1234 spider exercises etc.
So I'm looking for exercises which you can always play with a metronome. Of course I could stick to playing songs with it but I'd like to have a nice vocabulaire of exercises so I can improve my playing anytime



You can play pretty much any exercise with a metronome. So rather than looking for exercises that you can play to a metronome, just look for exercises period..... and play them to a metronome.

Keep in mind that playing songs/music to the metronome will add to your vocabulary as well as exercises will.


Quote by edg
I don't get it. You can practice ANYTHING to a metronome. Why would you think
there's some specific exercises -- like these chromatic or spider ones?


+1 exactly
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Sep 27, 2008,