#1
I need help, I understand theory quite well but i lack knowledge about chord progressions.

I am taught by a jazz teacher so I can and do switch scales every chord.

I'm wondering, is there a real theory behind chord progressions? For example 2 5 1 is a common jazz progression however they only use that in like 1/4 of the song usually. How do they come up with the rest? I always feel like a retard just experimenting...

Also I need ideas for shred chord progressions to jam to and practice sweep picking to.

Thanks a bunch in advance.
John Petrucci

The one and only god.
#2
Western harmony is, by far, the most complex in the world. You're not going to get a quick and concise answer on a forum (or anywhere). Pick up a few textbooks on Harmony (such as Piston's Harmony)
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#3
Quote by Archeo Avis
Western harmony is, by far, the most complex in the world. You're not going to get a quick and concise answer on a forum (or anywhere). Pick up a few textbooks on Harmony (such as Piston's Harmony)

Why not?

I'm not sure about the Jazz but most metal stuff is power chords.
#4
Quote by Ssargentslayer
I'm not sure about the Jazz but most metal stuff is power chords.


Because, as I just said, Western harmony is the most complex in the world. People go to school for years to study it. It's like saying "teach me chemistry"
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#5
Let's say you have a song in the key of C. You have pretty much unlimited options for chord progressions. You can use 7 different chords, I ii iii IV V vi vii° in other words C Dm Em F G Am B7.

These are merely guidelines though. The generic blues progression is I IV V but with jazz, the progressions are a bit more complex and also, for lack of a better word, weirder.

The musician, as a creative artist, has the license to do whatever the hell he/she wants though. If you think something that "breaks the rules" sounds good, then by golly, go for it. After all dissonance is just as important as consonance (although much overlooked outside of jazz).
#7
learn more songs by bands that you like and read more theory textbooks. You need a working idea of what the theory is talking about, it is not easy by a long shot because of the way chords lead into other chords, one chord may sound good as a turnaround, or a secondary dominant or some kind of cadence or a borrowed chord. That's the problem, there is no "right" way to make a progression, you could have all minor chords a major second apart if you want it may sound crappy but the possibilities of chord progressions are infinite. For me, that eureka moment comes when you know where you want the song to go and how you want the chord you are currently playing to act, what you play next partly determines how what you are currently playing sounds.
#8
Probably 98% of rock songs chord progression simply follow the vocals and the start or end of each line. Thats good starting info I suppose.