#1
I dunno if anyone read my last chemistry question, but i got another one.
Can density be used to identify a metal, if that is the only thing you know about a metal? Like if Metal A has a density of 6.83 can you correctly identify the metal knowing only that?
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#3
yes
look on the periodic table
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#4
Check Density Charts.
I'm in grade 9 and I know about that.
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#6
i dont know what its called but there's a book of all known items and their density
my chem teacher showed us a few days ago
#9
Yes
Each element has a density unique to it
as such, it can be used to identify a metal...if its an element
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#10
No. There is no way to directly identify a metal based solely on its density. Knowing the density could, in theory, help narrow down the number of choices, but given my current knowledge of chemistry there would be no way to find the metal based solely on density.

Metals vary too much. A singular metal can have multiple values for density. With only density, there's too many possibilities. If you knew the number of moles, then you could figure it out. If you knew the temperature and pressure, you might be able to figure it out.
#11
Quote by its irrelevant
No. There is no way to directly identify a metal based solely on its density. Knowing the density could, in theory, help narrow down the number of choices, but given my current knowledge of chemistry there would be no way to find the metal based solely on density.

Metals vary too much. A singular metal can have multiple values for density. With only density, there's too many possibilities. If you knew the number of moles, then you could figure it out. If you knew the temperature and pressure, you might be able to figure it out.


+1
#12
there is a chemistry thread...

edit: correction, there is no official chemistry thread, though considering the 5000000 different threads existing for individual questions, there ought to be. in fact, you might try searching the existing 5000000 threads and see if it was based around this question.


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Last edited by MTVget0FFtheAIR at Sep 26, 2008,
#13
An ELEMENT, yes. But there's no way to guarantee that a given metal is an element. And even then, you would still need temperature and pressure (afaik--metals expand and contract with heat--idk if pressure matters, probably not, but still--you're missing information)

If you want to assume STP (0 deg C and 101.3 kPa) and you know the metal is elemental, then yes, you can solve it and its simple. Otherwise, its not possible.
#14
Quote by its irrelevant
No. There is no way to directly identify a metal based solely on its density. Knowing the density could, in theory, help narrow down the number of choices, but given my current knowledge of chemistry there would be no way to find the metal based solely on density.

Metals vary too much. A singular metal can have multiple values for density. With only density, there's too many possibilities. If you knew the number of moles, then you could figure it out. If you knew the temperature and pressure, you might be able to figure it out.



ehhhhh not so much, although there are truths in that statement. in theory, if you have a 100% pure sample of a non-isotopic metal, you could use only the density, which is what i believe TS is talking about.
#15
umm there is no metal with average density 6.83 (g/mL) but the closest would be either [59]Praseodymium (Pr, with 6.78 g/mL), [60]Neodymium (Nd, with 7.00 g/mL), or [61]Promethium (Pm, with 7.00 g/mL)

either way, it is most likely a Lanthanide and probably radioactive

EDIT: actually the answer is porbably a compound like an alloy or something
#17
Well, i guess technically a metal in chemistry would be an element.
I was thinking metal in the general sense, which could include alloys and such.

TS just said metal. He didnt say it couldnt be an alloy, he didnt say it couldnt be isotopic.

w/e. I dont know that much bout chemistry. From what I know and based on lack of givens youve given, i dont think it possible.
#18
Quote by Eveningcrow5
umm there is no metal with average density 6.83 (g/mL) but the closest would be either [59]Praseodymium (Pr, with 6.78 g/mL), [60]Neodymium (Nd, with 7.00 g/mL), or [61]Promethium (Pm, with 7.00 g/mL)

either way, it is most likely a Lanthanide and probably radioactive

EDIT: actually the answer is porbably a compound like an alloy or something


Different textbooks and sources will give slightly different values. The general consensus, if asked for an element with a certain density, is to go for the closest one.
#19
The Pit. Actually. Knows. Chemistry.



But yea, given the fact that it's an element, u can determine which one it is from just density. Look it up on the density charts.
#20
Quote by Deliriumbassist
Different textbooks and sources will give slightly different values. The general consensus, if asked for an element with a certain density, is to go for the closest one.

quite true, as the periodic table i have on my wall has slightly different electronegativity (in Paulings) values for each elements; but it is within 0.01, so it really doesnt matter that much.
#22
check periodic table
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#23
Well I cant just check the periodic table, because we did a lab, where we found the mass and volume of metals A-E, and then calculated their densities. We then compared with other groups who did the same thing. There were numerous samples of each Metal, all the same metal but various masses and volumes (Metal A1 is the same substance as Metal A2, but different mass and volume). And everyone got different densities, but all of them were similar.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Miggy01
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#24
Of course everyone got different densities. You aren't going to get exactly the same in an experimental process. That's where standard deviation and probability tests and 95% confidence and all that comes into play... but you probably aren't doing that.
#25
Quote by Deliriumbassist
Of course everyone got different densities. You aren't going to get exactly the same in an experimental process. That's where standard deviation and probability tests and 95% confidence and all that comes into play... but you probably aren't doing that.


Yes, i realize this. Anyways, I'm beginning to think it's a no, because none of the densities my group or most other groups got match up exactly with a specific metal, they are too close to several metals. I think it's a trick question and the answer is no
Quote:
Originally Posted by Miggy01
I was looking at porn at the computer froze
#26
Quote by FriskyDrisky
Yes, i realize this. Anyways, I'm beginning to think it's a no, because none of the densities my group or most other groups got match up exactly with a specific metal, they are too close to several metals. I think it's a trick question and the answer is no


also, i wouldn't expect a high degree of accuracy/precision in the lab that you described, so it may be around more than one metal, and you should use your best guess as to which metal is the unknown. did you find the statistical averages (simple mean, median) for your results? it may help to determine a single density.
#27
Quote by Skierinanutshel
also, i wouldn't expect a high degree of accuracy/precision in the lab that you described, so it may be around more than one metal, and you should use your best guess as to which metal is the unknown. did you find the statistical averages (simple mean, median) for your results? it may help to determine a single density.


yes we did, of course there is always the chance that i somehow messed up and got the average wrong.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Miggy01
I was looking at porn at the computer froze
#28
Valence electrons!


I know virtually nothing about Chemistry, but the answer invariably has something to do with valence electrons.
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#30
certainly.
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