#2
i think that you should try either a. if you have some large-diameter studio headphones, plug those into the mic jack and use them to record or b. direct-input into the mic jack. as it is, the mic sounds like it's getting a little overloaded by the volume, and that makes it sound really muddy. i'm not sure if those are just stock loops because i've never used garageband before, but if you programmed them yourself they're pretty good.
personally, i play my own drums, but i'm bad at it so its a tradeoff.
#3
yah it's a crappy little pinhole mic on top of the computer, I'm trying to remix it to brighten it up a little bit right now
#4
like i said, use some big studio headphones. the larger diameter means it can handle higher volumes without distortion. and C4C man.
#5
i was using studio headphones. the problem is that the microphone on the computer picks up all the noise in the room as opposed to just the amp
#6
no i mean literally use studio headphones for the microphone. they aren't powered, so the diaphragm can work in either direction. if you were to plug a mic into a headphone jack, it would make noise. very slight, but it would make noise.
#7
Well other than the quality problem that has been mentioned(and is understood completely) this is a pretty cool little piece. Its different but in a fresh way.
Rockybo on Gwar: "What costumes? They're from fucking outer-space, you retard."
#8
Quote by childofsin
no i mean literally use studio headphones for the microphone. they aren't powered, so the diaphragm can work in either direction. if you were to plug a mic into a headphone jack, it would make noise. very slight, but it would make noise.

really? I'll have to try that next time,
I've uploading a better mixed track, it's a lot clearer.
Last edited by qstionauthority at Sep 27, 2008,