#1
ok so id like to start doing some classical fingerpicking stuff. i went to the store today and bought some fingerpicks.
what are some good songs to learn how to use them?
thanks
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#3
Yeah ^^^ I agree. Don't get too used to relying on those things. Get used to playing with your fingers. I've been playing playing professionally for over 25yrs, and I never use those. Some do and that's a personal preferences. But... butt.. be able to play without them. Don't make those a crutch to playing.
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#4
I have to agree with dgonz anyway a real good song to learn and reletively easy is moonlight sonata can't remember wich part but you'l know it if you hear it, alicia keys used it once
#6
For a start, I think you should ditch the finger picks. I've not known of a single classical guitarist using them.
#7
I've just started about 2 months ago myself. The first song I learned was Blackbird followed by Dust In The Wind and Time in a Bottle.

Oh and let me echo everyone else, ditch the finger picks. You dont need them. My challenge at first was being able to fingerpick loud enough. I had a weird tendency to play very softly. I asked a respected musician how I play louder and his response was "Play it louder". There wasn't any hidden secret to it. I just took my time, slowed the song down and played each note louder until I was comfortable speeding it up.

Good luck with your fingerpicking. It's very rewarding.

Steve

Baltimore Guitarist Group
http://guitarist.meetup.com/168
#8
I started off using picks years ago, but be advised they are far more difficult to learn with. While I still use them for certain tunes when lots of volume is required, I find I play most of the time with naked fingers, and find it more enjoyable. In short, I'd recommend "no picks" to learn, and if you really want to use 'em, wait until you have the basics mastered.
#9
I also found that fingerpicks are harder to use. You don't get as much feeling out of them as you do using your own fingers. There's not as much feedback from fingerpicks.

Anyway... my first fingerpicking song was Blackbird by the Beatles as well. It took me about 3 days to get down perfectly.
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#11
Plus, it's great to be able to pick up a guitar and just play it with your bare hands. I've seen a lot of players (electric and acoustic) that are so used to using picks, that you give them a guitar without a pick and they can't play anything. That's just pathetic to me.
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#12
Quote by stevedundalk
<snip> I asked a respected musician how I play louder and his response was "Play it louder". There wasn't any hidden secret to it. I just took my time, slowed the song down and played each note louder until I was comfortable speeding it up.

Good luck with your fingerpicking. It's very rewarding.

Steve

Baltimore Guitarist Group
http://guitarist.meetup.com/168


Hi Steve,

Actually, classical technique has some very firm guidelines on how to achieve greater volume without sacrificing tonal integrity.
The principles of this are fundamental and are reliant upon good hand position and upon the finger's playing-action.
In brief, the string must be propelled by the fingertip, as much as possible, into the guitar, i.e toward the soundhole, without hooking or pulling the string toward the hand.
A number of considerations come into play in order to achieve this aim, the most salient being the hand postion above the strings and the action of the finger itself - all segments of the finger should move in the same direction (toward the palm and elbow during the striking action. A common and very bad mistake is for the basal segment to kick outward while the others move in toward the palm. This results in the finger pulling the strings rather than pushing them, producing weak tone and volume.