#1
so i have a bunch of poplar sitting around, so i figured why not make some body's

question is, what woods (yes plural) go well with it, especailly something that can make a good top?

thanks
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#2
Um, anything really. Two woods don't go well together I guess. Tonally, wood makes up such a tiny percent in electric guitars that anything will look cool and sound good. I mean, think about it, bass guitars use the most exotic wood on earth and they don't have tonal issues and usually sound great, but so do Precision bass guitars that are made of alder or ash.
#3
hm... maybe wenge?
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#4
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Um, anything really. Two woods don't go well together I guess. Tonally, wood makes up such a tiny percent in electric guitars that anything will look cool and sound good. I mean, think about it, bass guitars use the most exotic wood on earth and they don't have tonal issues and usually sound great, but so do Precision bass guitars that are made of alder or ash.

i presonally agree with you on this, but others still argue it makes up a good bit of your tone, so i dont know. i guess im just looking for something that would look good with it really.
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#6
I honestly think it has nothing to do with the wood. Maybe if there is an affect, it's barely noticeable. I mean, how does wood (non-ferrous) effect a magnetic coil? That's ridiculous in my opinion.

Resonance is a joke too, a string will vibrate until it runs out of energy. If you want better resonance, strike the string harder? I mean, how in the hell could wood keep a string from shedding all of it's energy as quickly as another wood?
#7
^ Yeah I feel this way too... but others will always argue. Personally, I don't really care.

It's more about the player than the instrument. As long as you use quality body making woods, and quality parts, and you build it right, then you can make it sound like anything you want.

Build with quality, it will be fine.

As for woods, well you could try some heavy contrasting dark woods. Wenge, zebrawood, pao ferro, or some really cool coloured ones like blood wood or purple heart.

There is always the classic figured top.
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#8
A woods tone is so unnoticable that you can EQ it out. Its still better to use good tonal woods in an electric guitar though, because they'll "vintage" sound better. Older guitars sounding better is something I do believe in

Resonance and sustain are affected by wood. The denser the wood and the more wood you have the more energy the string is going to have to disperse in order to get it to vibrate through the bridge. This means there is more energy in that stays in the string,because it dissipates slower into the wood. The wood vibrating and then feeding that little bit of vibration back into the string is how wood tone supposedly works. The string then transfers it to the pickup.

This is why if you place the end of your headstock against a wall, you'll get more sustain. The string can no longer vibrate at that end of the guitar as easily, so it keeps more energy in it for a longer period of time.

Or at least thats how all of it always made sense to me.
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#9
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Resonance and sustain are affected by wood. The denser the wood and the more wood you have the more energy the string is going to have to disperse in order to get it to vibrate through the bridge. This means there is more energy in that stays in the string,because it dissipates slower into the wood. The wood vibrating and then feeding that little bit of vibration back into the string is how wood tone supposedly works. The string then transfers it to the pickup.

This is why if you place the end of your headstock against a wall, you'll get more sustain. The string can no longer vibrate at that end of the guitar as easily, so it keeps more energy in it for a longer period of time.



When you stick the headstock against the wall, it just resonates through the wall, it doesn't actually sustain any longer.

Someone needs to do some comparisons and just put all this hype to sleep!