#1
I've never practiced with a metronome. Ever. I have no problems keeping time alone or with a drummer in MOST cases. Rarely however I will run into trouble though and I figured since I want to start learning how to really do fast sweep picking ill start practicing with a metronome.

Unfortunately I cant keep time with a metronome for more then 30 seconds even on 40 bpm (which is the lowest mine goes too) I start off ok... and then something weird happens. I cant really explain it, but I feel confusion and frustration and I get overwhelmed by a simple damn metronome. I try counting it out, tapping the foot but I think what happens is I get very ADHD (Ive never been diagnosed with it im just guessing) and lose focus very quickly? Im not really sure. Ive tried just play the same damn note over and over again and just keeping time playing one note at 40 bpm and.... nothing... Unless I just hit that one note for every click (which is just as frustrating) I wont be able to keep time.

Its starting to drive me insane.

So im wondering. I have a drum machine, can I practice with that and get the same effect as practicing with a metronome? Because I think half of the problem is how obnoxious hearing that same click over and over again is.
#2
probably your mind cant focus on that one tone clicking noise. i bet you will find it easier with a drum machine doing a simple rock beat.
#3
Practicing with a metronome at extra slow speeds is very hard. Ask a drummer if he's more impressed by the guy who plays a fast fill or the guy who keeps flawless time at 20bpm.

try 60 or 80 bpm. the root of the problem is that you're just not as good at keeping in time as you think you are. Everyone has this problem until they sit down with a metronome and it starts to jump out glaringly. I'm working on it myself right now.
#4
Aaaah good ol' metronome frustration. I remember that from piano class when I was a kid.
First of all, you say you put your metronome on 40 bpm, that is grossly slow, even for practising a fast song. (one beat every 1,5 seconds, making a 4/4 measure last about 6 seconds = slow)
Secondly, Make sure you count ONE! - two - THREE - four, stressing the one and the three.This is where the musical stresses in your song should be. Every count is a metronome click. Some metronomes stress the first (and some also the third) click. Maybe you're just nog starting on the right click. These metronomes have a control for setting the time signature (e.g. 3/4 in stead of 4/4) playing a 4/4 with a metronome on 3/4 is quite impossible.
In my opinion, practising with a drum machine gives you the same training, just a bit more fun. A drum loop is cool, a metronome makes you want to strangle a cat.
#6
I use an electronic metronome with headphones - almost impossible to stop concentrating on the beat that way.

However, as GoWithTheFLow said above, I find using a drum machine much more enjoyable.
#7
Quote by Blaster Bob
the root of the problem is that you're just not as good at keeping in time as you think you are. Everyone has this problem until they sit down with a metronome and it starts to jump out glaringly.


Bingo.
#8
Quote by Blaster Bob
Practicing with a metronome at extra slow speeds is very hard. Ask a drummer if he's more impressed by the guy who plays a fast fill or the guy who keeps flawless time at 20bpm.


+1

Just keep working on it, and be patient. That kind of frustrating brain hurts feeling you have when you practice at 40 bpm means you are learning. If necessary start at about 60 and work downward until you can handle 40. You'll be amazed at how tight your playing feels when you speed it back up. But it does take time.
#9
Practiced a few hours last night with a drum machine. No problems keeping time. It was good practice. Went down to 40, nailed it with a bit of trouble at first but got it. I think Ill continue using the drum machine as I no long see a point in going with the metronome. Unless someone can give me a good logical reason as to why practicing with a metronome would be better.

the root of the problem is that you're just not as good at keeping in time as you think you are. Everyone has this problem until they sit down with a metronome and it starts to jump out glaringly.


I disagree.
#10
I am going to repost this in every metrenome thread i see. I am on a mission now to improve UG's timing. ok. here is what helped me. its easy. its mundane. its boring. but it works. set your metronome to a comfortable speed. then just try to play a single note on each click. notice i said on. you want each note struck to hit perfectly on that click. you can do the same with chords etc. After you have that nailed, try to play two notes per beat. so instead of 1...1...1 (the dots meaning counting) you go 1.2.1.2.1, then try to play triplets if you feel daring enough, then move up to playing 4 notes per beat. practise this from very very slow, the aim is accuracy not speed. i teach guitar and have found this method the easiest way to improve timing with guitar. good luck
you are hearing me talk

CHECK OUT MY TUNES ON MY PROFILE

Gear:

laney VC30
tele/jaguar hybrid
Big muff
Small clone chorus
memory boy
Hadrwire RV-7 reverb
DD3 delay
Dunlop Crybaby wah
TS9 overdrive clone
home made tremolo
#11
imo, just get John Petrucci Rock Discipline, decent practice, that's how I learned stuff around metronome
#12
I assume you're doing 16th notes at 40 bpm? Do it with 8th notes at 80 bpm instead, it makes it easier to concentrate.
Quote by Sonicxlover
Kensai, I think I'll get a flamboyant sig.

Quote by Sonicxlover
Kensai, I think I'll get a flamboyant sig.

Quote by Sonicxlover
Kensai, I think I'll get a flamboyant sig.


Parker Nitefly Mojo sonnn
Jackson DK2M Dinky
Carvin Legacy
Fender Blues Jr.
Roland Cube 30X
#13
^ disagree. The whole having to concentrate really hard is an important skill that is improved by playing 16ths at 40.
#14
Quote by se012101
^ disagree. The whole having to concentrate really hard is an important skill that is improved by playing 16ths at 40.


Then I disagree. I used to have problems concentrating at 16th notes (might be my ADHD but I doubt it), and I find it much easier to concentrate with 8th notes.
Quote by Sonicxlover
Kensai, I think I'll get a flamboyant sig.

Quote by Sonicxlover
Kensai, I think I'll get a flamboyant sig.

Quote by Sonicxlover
Kensai, I think I'll get a flamboyant sig.


Parker Nitefly Mojo sonnn
Jackson DK2M Dinky
Carvin Legacy
Fender Blues Jr.
Roland Cube 30X
#15
That's the whole point, though. You are sharpening your concentration skills by doing this. Locking on at 40 is difficult. If you work on something which is difficult, then you get better. Playing 8th notes at 80 is easy, so you don't improve because it's already easy.

All that said, I don't know what it is like to have to deal with ADHD, so your way may be better for you.
#16
Quote by se012101
That's the whole point, though. You are sharpening your concentration skills by doing this. Locking on at 40 is difficult. If you work on something which is difficult, then you get better. Playing 8th notes at 80 is easy, so you don't improve because it's already easy.

All that said, I don't know what it is like to have to deal with ADHD, so your way may be better for you.


This is true. It's more difficult, so it's a better way to practice getting your timing correct.
Quote by SlinkyBlue
I remember when I was really young, I had a wet dream in which i was being dragged along an urban countryside by a pickup truck.

Don't ask me I have no idea how the hell it happened.




To Me:

Quote by Son.Of.TheViper

I love you
#17
yea i would definitely recommend just sitting down and working on getting your timing down simply by playing 1 note per click (try to bury the beat, i.e. play the note so that it cancels out the sound of the metronome click), then on to 2 notes per click, then three, then four, etc. it really really helps with timing.

and i agree with se012101 when he said that if you want to play 16ths at 40 then play 16ths at 40 and not 8ths at 80. regardless of what someone may contest, your sense of time has got to be more accurate during 16ths at 40 because you don't have a click on the 3rd note to help guide you. thus you have to learn to "feel" the subdivision of a 16th rather than a sped up 8th to be able to play quickly. increasing your feel = increasing your skills.
#18
Quote by Blaster Bob
Practicing with a metronome at extra slow speeds is very hard. Ask a drummer if he's more impressed by the guy who plays a fast fill or the guy who keeps flawless time at 20bpm.

try 60 or 80 bpm. the root of the problem is that you're just not as good at keeping in time as you think you are. Everyone has this problem until they sit down with a metronome and it starts to jump out glaringly. I'm working on it myself right now.



Everything in this post is more true than most people on this forum will ever recognize.

As a drummer, fast fills just don't impress me. But look at the guy getting paid $150k a year playing for Jessica Simpson or Britney Spears, and watch him keep simple 80bpm grooves feeling perfect and flawless. That's why he's gettin' paid.

And (I will admit I'm completely guilty of this) unless you practice with a metronome every day, all of your bad habits are going to come out in a painfully obvious way when you try to do so.
#19
Quote by tangled
Practiced a few hours last night with a drum machine. No problems keeping time. It was good practice. Went down to 40, nailed it with a bit of trouble at first but got it. I think Ill continue using the drum machine as I no long see a point in going with the metronome. Unless someone can give me a good logical reason as to why practicing with a metronome would be better.


I disagree.

Im in the same boat as you. I can keep time with a metronome but i dont feel the beat like i would with a backing track or drum machine. I have a simple drum software from the drumprograms sticky in the riffs and recording forum and i can make simple beats at whatever tempo. This is better than beep beep beep and i dont see why the metronome is requiered either. To each his own. In my opionion as long as you are actually keeping time during practice then the end justifies the means.
#20
Practicing with a drum machine is WAY better than practicing with nothing.
WAY better.

There's really only 1 reason to use a metronome: precision. A metronome gives
you an uncluttered precise click. If you're working on the precision of your timing,
where you try and "bury the click" EXACTLY and not a little before or after, it's
easier to hear. Easier to hear, gives you better feedback on the need to make
adjustments.