#1
ahh where do i start. first off for some reason when i play rythms with a metronome i feel like the metronome is speeding up even though i know its not, maybe its because my hands getting tired or soemthing but it always happens no matter how much i try to keep on time. so i try to keep up with the metronome even when i think its going faster. but then when i listen to the recording it sounds like im going faster with the "metronome" so somehow my stupid ****ing mind is making the metronome seem faster or soemthing, ive always been someone rythmically challenged, its really annoying, i practice with a metronome almost every day too. i see no improvement though. i dont have this problem as much with leads, i can do harmonizing leads ok but thats because im jsut copying what i did earlier and not a metronome. its really getting in the way of my recording too. i have all this stuff i written bvut i cant post it here or on youtube because it sucks. plain and simple. i wish i could play something and be able to post it and not get flamed. sometimes someone will tell me to just post it and its ok then when i do i get 100 "you suck"s and "practice more you went off rythm" i dotn get it, i practice a lot and allthough im seeing a bit of improvement in my finger dexterity and alt picking ability i see none in rythm.
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#2
Just keep practicing and focus on success rather than failure. It takes time but if you'll get there.
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#3
You're definitely not UG's only Celtic Frost fan.
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#4
do you tap your foot to the beat as well, or do you just let the metronome do it? getting your whole body "in the groove" will help you rhythmically.
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#5
ok. here is what helped me. its easy. its mundane. its boring. but it works. set your metronome to a comfortable speed. then just try to play a single note on each click. notice i said on. you want each note struck to hit perfectly on that click. you can do the same with chords etc. After you have that nailed, try to play two notes per beat. so instead of 1...1...1 (the dots meaning counting) you go 1.2.1.2.1, then try to play triplets if you feel daring enough, then move up to playing 4 notes per beat. practise this from very very slow, the aim is accuracy not speed. i teach guitar and have found this method the easiest way to improve timing with guitar. good luck
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#6
Stay loose, try to bury the beat (when you time your strums/picks perfectly, they should somewhat cover up the click noise of the metronome).


Try playing with other people, guitarists or a drummer.
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#7
Quote by LedZeppelin9345
do you tap your foot to the beat as well, or do you just let the metronome do it? getting your whole body "in the groove" will help you rhythmically.


Good tip right there. I personnally don't tap my foot, but I find it much easier to stay in rythmn when you're headbanging, even just slightly. You gotta like, make the riff pass through you. It's hard to explain, but yeah. Try to get yourself into it and help youself with your head, feets, or any part of your body that you like using.
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#8
Have you ever played with a drum machine or a drummer? The metronome is a musicans greatest tool and friend. You mentioning that you feel it going faster or slower is normal. The only way i can explain that last sentence is that in music you learn to control time. You divide a second up into at most 16 parts (64th notes).

I'd like to add that you should relax, tap your foot in 1/4 notes and try your very best to stay on that 1/4 note. Play 1/8 notes while you tap your 1/4... etc. your groove can happen anywhere in your four beats but always keep your tapping on the 1/4 note.

I had that same problem that you're having and you eventually overcome it. Don't stress about it.

Playing with drums or a drum machine helps alot too because you really get to work on your groove then. Maybe the one can substitute for the other and you'll know where you actually went wrong and can focus on just that part to get it right. Then everything starts clicking into place and your confidence level rises when you have to show someone your new song.

hope this helps, enjoy
#9
I'd just like to add whatever weight I can to all the advice above, and to encourage you to keep playing and keep composing, and keep listening to your critics. Don't let them hurt your feelings too much, but do listen.
#10
Quote by Spike6sic6
Good tip right there. I personnally don't tap my foot, but I find it much easier to stay in rythmn when you're headbanging, even just slightly. You gotta like, make the riff pass through you. It's hard to explain, but yeah. Try to get yourself into it and help youself with your head, feets, or any part of your body that you like using.

Definatly. You have to feel the rythem. I tap my foot sometimes and not other times but i do the same as you i move a little bit to the beat in some way. When you feel it people can tell.

Maybe the metronome is whats ****ing you ts. I personally prefer drums or coutning on my own. Try downloading some backing tracks for songs you know and playing over them. Maybe you can feel drums and bass and get more into it than beep beep beep beep. I tap my foot if i have nothing and if i play with drummer and bass then i feel it from them. Keeping time is definatly majorly important but the metronome isnt the only way to do it.
#11
I dont know if this will work for you, but if you can get like a live dvd of a band you really like, or even just their videos on youtube, and play a song you know exactly with the band it'll help alot. but do it with a song you know perfectly, nothing challenging, and just do it over and over, its basically playing with a band. (sort of) but i like doing with a live dvd better, because if you know most of the setlist, you can just play the whole thing right with em.
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#12
Quote by /-\liceNChains
Definatly. You have to feel the rythem. I tap my foot sometimes and not other times but i do the same as you i move a little bit to the beat in some way. When you feel it people can tell.

Maybe the metronome is whats ****ing you ts. I personally prefer drums or coutning on my own. Try downloading some backing tracks for songs you know and playing over them. Maybe you can feel drums and bass and get more into it than beep beep beep beep. I tap my foot if i have nothing and if i play with drummer and bass then i feel it from them. Keeping time is definatly majorly important but the metronome isnt the only way to do it.


Couldn't agree more. Concerning the metronome, I know everyone says to practice with one, but I don't use one. I practice with GuitarPro so I have every instruments which makes it very easy to stay in time, at least for me. I find it easier then a metronome, but that might just be my personnal opinion.

GuitarPro is truly a great program. A good trick I have too is to make the part of the song play, but putting the sound of the instrument you're reproducing to off. For example if you are trying a lead lick(this trick seems easier on lead, since the rythm can help you a lot), turn off the sound of the lead guitar and play instead of it, kinda as if you were playing with a band. It's a great practice if you don't have bands, or just if you wanna improve your skills on this aspect.

As for what I said about involving your body, I think /-\liceNChains understood exactly what I meant. It's like youre body is slightly moving to the rythmn of the song. The best trick for this is to just play your favorite riffs. It will definatly be MUCH easier to be into it if you love them.
Quote by MH400
a girl on the interwebz?

You have 2 options.

1. Tits.
2. GTFO.

#13
Quote by Fuzzbox91
first off for some reason when i play rythms with a metronome i feel like the metronome is speeding up even though i know its not


First of all, it's not that easy. I think a lot of people take it as a given, but I wish
I had a dime for every recording I've heard where the timing destroyed someone's
playing (even though they probably thought it was good because it was "fast").

Secondly, you can practice to a metronome a million years and still not "get it". It
all depends on your practice. Do you LISTEN carefully to make sure your notes
hit the beat and do it at slow enough starting tempos so you can tell?

Thirdly, make sure how you're recording yourself doesn't have latency issues.
Some setups (particularly on a PC) can mess with your head on this if you don't
know what's going on. Probably not your case, but worth a check.
#14
The way I do things, from dancing to composing rhythms, is just to do it randomly.
Just start waving your fingers to a beat or tap your desk with your finger. Eventuall ou'll begin to feel he beats naturally.


And please post what you've written out.
The first piece I ever composed was a C major scale run at 32 bpm.
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#15
Quote by edg
First of all, it's not that easy. I think a lot of people take it as a given, but I wish
I had a dime for every recording I've heard where the timing destroyed someone's
playing (even though they probably thought it was good because it was "fast").

this.... this this this this this +1 million. i've heard a ton of good recordings and countless (see thousands or more) bad ones. know what the good ones ALL have in common. EVERYTHING was recorded to a metronome meticulously. i've had people tell me "dude i did well over a hundred takes to get that 10 second part perfectly in time" i've adopted this attitude. when i record something i listen to it about 10 times after the initial "ok i recorded it good and in time" which might take hourse to begin with. if i can listen to it 10 times and not hear any discrepencies then its time to move on.
Quote by edg

Secondly, you can practice to a metronome a million years and still not "get it". It
all depends on your practice. Do you LISTEN carefully to make sure your notes
hit the beat and do it at slow enough starting tempos so you can tell?

this is kinda what i was referring to of recording something and listening to it 10 times even after i think its perfect. sometimes you'll catch little things on the 4th or 5th listening and then you have to decide "is that problem worth fixing, does it need fixing" if its a timing issue then the answer is yes, it does. if its a note inflection issue then its kinda a personal choice thing.
Quote by edg

Thirdly, make sure how you're recording yourself doesn't have latency issues.
Some setups (particularly on a PC) can mess with your head on this if you don't
know what's going on. Probably not your case, but worth a check.

the higher the quality the recording gear and interface the less of an issue this is. i use a mobile preusb input (i recommend them to EVERYONE, they're excellent single input recording devices and they're cheap) and acid 6.0, most "pro quality" recording programs have latency compensation if there is even a problem. i know my interface has a latency of 10ms and acid compensates for it.