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#1
And how I perceive sonic structures has changed, Pit, over the past few months. Getting out of this state of mind could take a lot of work, but I don't know if it's necessary.

I ventured into the avant-garde for a few months, immersed my ears into the savage compositions of Mick Barr, and Colin Marston. It's done. I can hear your melodies, of your famous guitarists, but all I see are the simple patterns, purple or gold colours, a beginning, structure and end. next song, repeat.

Pit, who's been through this, who's stayed into this and what out there can interest the ears again if all you can perceive are the sonic bizarre staircases the buzz-saw fantasma emit? I think it's time for a hiatus.
#4
keep off the grass bro

but seriously...hmm...it's the same when you're stoned and listening to some complex piece, maybe classical or some new symphonic-metal

then going back to your basic chords and stripped down garage rock


you should never forget that a vital part of music is emotion. That's what makes music different from each other and can be something refreshing and therapeutic.
#5
what?
someone wasnts to get reported
Pull my finger

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#6
Quote by Wolfwood╬
keep off the grass bro

but seriously...hmm...it's the same when you're stoned and listening to some complex piece, maybe classical or some new symphonic-metal

then going back to your basic chords and stripped down garage rock


you should never forget that a vital part of music is emotion. That's what makes music different from each other and can be something refreshing and therapeutic.

Oh I have no interest in drugs. I think I've exposed my ears to too much sonic mathematics. Now everything I listen to appears mathematical, how I perceive it and see it. No, drugs are not needed for this, I think I just need a break from the drone and drazzle of the avant-garde.
#7
Minus the pseudo-druggy stylings here, I believe that's called "broadening your horizons." Stop trying to make it sound so dang fancy.
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Last edited by Athetosis at Sep 29, 2008,
#9


I'm sure.

Anyways, if you want to actually be enlightened to something that matters, read "This Is Your Brain On Music" by Daniel Levitin

...modes and scales are still useless.


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#11
Quote by Muzikh
Oh I have no interest in drugs. I think I've exposed my ears to too much sonic mathematics. Now everything I listen to appears mathematical, how I perceive it and see it. No, drugs are not needed for this, I think I just need a break from the drone and drazzle of the avant-garde.

I did start to notice a lot of that, but only for a few bands...
Like Meshuggah, Textures n all... Who are mathematical.
But yeah, music is mathematical to an extent.
Everything is mathematical.

Just like einstein said. "All religions, arts and sciences are branches of the same tree."
#12
Quote by af_the_fragile
I did start to notice a lot of that, but only for a few bands...
Like Meshuggah, Textures n all... Who are mathematical.
But yeah, music is mathematical to an extent.
Everything is mathematical.

Just like einstein said. "All religions, arts and sciences are branches of the same tree."

Mathematics are the final product of reductionism. Everything reduces to numbers.
#13
Quote by Xiaoxi


I'm sure.

Anyways, if you want to actually be enlightened to something that matters, read "This Is Your Brain On Music" by Daniel Levitin



That book has been on my mind for a couple of weeks now? Is it good? I keep wanting to buy it but I am kind of broke. So is it worth it?
#14
Oh really now? Two of UG's favourite guitarists are Joe Satriani and Steve Vai.

Listen to Steve Vai's "Fire Garden Suite", or Satriani's "Flying in a Blue Dream" and I think if you have a half-decent pair of ears, you'll feel something there.

As for simplicity, Pink Floyd's arrangements are technically simple, but sonically its vastly complex. Simple patterns... well, so many songs still sound great because of that. Zep's "Whole Lotta Love", Tallica's "Nothing Else Matters", Deep Purple's "Smoke on Water", Sabbath's "Ironman", Nirvana's "Smells Like Teen Spirit", I could do this all day...

Even though you've explored avant-garde stuff, I believe you're ears need more training.

And lay off that sweet hawaiian dope!
Don't buy Guitar Hero.
Buy Guitar Pro.


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#15
Quote by Seryaph
That book has been on my mind for a couple of weeks now? Is it good? I keep wanting to buy it but I am kind of broke. So is it worth it?

I have it and read it. It's alright I suppose. Has its moments, but a lot of filler.
#16
Quote by Muzikh
Mathematics are the final product of reductionism. Everything reduces to numbers.



Go listen to John Coltrane.
#17
I have a reasonably similar sort of thing, I was originally only interested in music predominantly dominated by chords, I then went to a faze where the more complex it was the better. Then I heard David Gilmour live at Abbey Road, that changed my outlook on music totally, I now realise that everything, no matter how complex or simple can sound good.

to summarise I think that you will grow out of it to a degree, it will still be there, but you will grow out of it.
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#18
Quote by Seryaph
That book has been on my mind for a couple of weeks now? Is it good? I keep wanting to buy it but I am kind of broke. So is it worth it?

It's a good read and it'll refine your understanding of music.

...modes and scales are still useless.


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#19
Quote by Seryaph
Go listen to John Coltrane.

Excellent idea, I haven't listened to him in years. I can still recall my favourite songs by him were "In a Sentimental Mood" and "Welcome".

You're right, it's time to get back into improvised music and soul.
#20
so TS, you're saying that you get no pleasure from normal music anymore? I can understand how you might get pleasure form listening to music that doesn't follow simple patterns, and how it might please a certain part of your brain, but to no longer get pleasure from simple music just doesn't seem right. Perhaps it just doesn't interest you intellectually because you already know how the songs are composed, but you should still get a good feeling from it.

(and btw, you come off as a bit pretentious)
#21
Synesthesia?

You know what? I'm certain of it now. I, Dr. Quintessence153, diagnose Muzikh with acute synesthesia. In my professional opinion, he should begin electroshock therapy immediately. You're welcome.
No animals were harmed in order to bring you the above post. However, several photons were greatly inconvenienced.

ALL GLORY TO THE HYPNO-TOAD
Last edited by Quintessence153 at Sep 29, 2008,
#22
Quote by Muzikh
Excellent idea, I haven't listened to him in years. I can still recall my favourite songs by him were "In a Sentimental Mood" and "Welcome".

You're right, it's time to get back into improvised music and soul.



"In a Sentimental Mood" is fantastic. I also quite enjoyed "Blue Bossa".
And frankly, I always truly loved his work with Miles Davis.
Kind of Blue sends chills down my spine.
#23
Quote by Glen'sHeroicAct

(and btw, you come off as a bit pretentious)


Last edited by Muzikh at Sep 29, 2008,
#25
Quote by Quintessence153
Synesthesia?

You know what? I'm certain of it now. I, Dr. Quintessence153, diagnose Muzikh with acute synesthesia. In my professional opinion, he should begin electroshock therapy immediately. You're welcome.

What is given a title of synesthesia, I believe is simply the human experience of metaphors through multiple senses, whether consciously aware of it or not. Nothing more, nothing less.
#27
hm, I find this very interesting. How do you perceive extremely musically complex classical and metal music? What about Coltrane's later extremely crazy music that makes absolutely no sense to most people?
#28
Quote by Muzikh
What is given a title of synesthesia, I believe is simply the human experience of metaphors through multiple senses, whether consciously aware of it or not. Nothing more, nothing less.

Yeah? Well as of my last post, I'm a doctor! So don't argue!
No animals were harmed in order to bring you the above post. However, several photons were greatly inconvenienced.

ALL GLORY TO THE HYPNO-TOAD
#29
Quote by Muzikh
And how I perceive sonic structures has changed, Pit, over the past few months. Getting out of this state of mind could take a lot of work, but I don't know if it's necessary.

I ventured into the avant-garde for a few months, immersed my ears into the savage compositions of Mick Barr, and Colin Marston. It's done. I can hear your melodies, of your famous guitarists, but all I see are the simple patterns, purple or gold colours, a beginning, structure and end. next song, repeat.

Pit, who's been through this, who's stayed into this and what out there can interest the ears again if all you can perceive are the sonic bizarre staircases the buzz-saw fantasma emit? I think it's time for a hiatus.

I think you should... I dunno... get over yourself? No offense, though offense will probably be taken.
Banging on a trash can
Drumming on a street light
#30
Quote by The4thHorsemen
hm, I find this very interesting. How do you perceive extremely musically complex classical and metal music? What about Coltrane's later extremely crazy music that makes absolutely no sense to most people?

Everything makes sense. Sun Ra, one of my favorite jazz composers, makes sense. You do not need definite notes to structure a song, it's the direction of those notes that matter, it the visual of the sounds, it's the perpetual climax and crash never anticipated at moments you'd least want them there.

Classical music is training for the brain. Two years ago, I was into Chopin and Debussy (especially Chopin). Debussy has a sound as if painted with light pastels. Greens, pinks and whites, backed with emotions of gold-black undertones. Chopin was strictly white and gold, with such formations! Like skyscrapers really! I always imagined his music as architecture.

Colin Marston's "Indricothere" covers just about any extreme form of metal you'll want to hear. It's kinetic and a nonstop overwhelming build and rush of sky colours parralell strikes.

It's after I listened to Ocrilim and Octis, that I noticed structed too much, nothing ever sounds random or out of place now. Ever. There it all dwindles down to numbers most people will find negligible or not worth noticing. I spent too much time with this music and it made me emotionally dead to what I used to listen to. Just need to take a break with Coltrane I guess.
#31
Quote by Quintessence153
Yeah? Well as of my last post, I'm a doctor! So don't argue!

Yes sir
May I please have another?
#32
Quote by Muzikh
Everything makes sense. Sun Ra, one of my favorite jazz composers, makes sense. You do not need definite notes to structure a song, it's the direction of those notes that matter, it the visual of the sounds, it's the perpetual climax and crash never anticipated at moments you'd least want them there.

Classical music is training for the brain. Two years ago, I was into Chopin and Debussy (especially Chopin). Debussy has a sound as if painted with light pastels. Greens, pinks and whites, backed with emotions of gold-black undertones. Chopin was strictly white and gold, with such formations! Like skyscrapers really! I always imagined his music as architecture.

Colin Marston's "Indricothere" covers just about any extreme form of metal you'll want to hear. It's kinetic and a nonstop overwhelming build and rush of sky colours parralell strikes.

It's after I listened to Ocrilim and Octis, that I noticed structed too much, nothing ever sounds random or out of place now. Ever. There it all dwindles down to numbers most people will find negligible or not worth noticing. I spent too much time with this music and it made me emotionally dead to what I used to listen to. Just need to take a break with Coltrane I guess.



Well, to the average person, Coltrane's later music just sounds bad and unintelligible, ya know? It's just something their mind doesn't really comprehend (not being pretentious, it just is.) I myself have trouble with it sometimes. if I'm in the right state of mind it is very interesting to listen to, but not something I actually enjoy, ya know?

with me there are things that are extremely complex and dissonant that I may not like, but I find interesting musically. Then I have the music I actually enjoy, whether it's simple or not.

Your problem seems to be that you simply enjoy things that are complex and interesting, plus that combined with the apparent synesthesia makes those things more enjoyable to you. I think you need to just try to forget about all of that when listening to other music and primarily pay attention to the emotions it makes you feel.

For example: Walk by Pantera. mind-numbingly boring from a musical perspective but it invokes a feeling of raw rage. it's just like SATCHEL KICK!!!! YAAAAH!!!! it grabs you by the balls and won't let go, you know? RE! SPECT! WALK! WHAT DID YOU SAY?

then on the other side there's Bob Dylan with Knocking On Heaven's Door. it's so simple, just G D C and G D Am. but it just gives you the most relaxed, chilled out peaceful feeling, coupled with Dylan's lyrical ability to keep your interest.
#33
meshuggah as mentioned
strapping young lad album: heavy as a really heavy thing
robert johnson
the smiths song: suedehead


yeah... check m out.
#34
Quote by Muzikh
Everything makes sense. Sun Ra, one of my favorite jazz composers, makes sense. You do not need definite notes to structure a song, it's the direction of those notes that matter, it the visual of the sounds, it's the perpetual climax and crash never anticipated at moments you'd least want them there.

Classical music is training for the brain. Two years ago, I was into Chopin and Debussy (especially Chopin). Debussy has a sound as if painted with light pastels. Greens, pinks and whites, backed with emotions of gold-black undertones. Chopin was strictly white and gold, with such formations! Like skyscrapers really! I always imagined his music as architecture.

Colin Marston's "Indricothere" covers just about any extreme form of metal you'll want to hear. It's kinetic and a nonstop overwhelming build and rush of sky colours parralell strikes.

It's after I listened to Ocrilim and Octis, that I noticed structed too much, nothing ever sounds random or out of place now. Ever. There it all dwindles down to numbers most people will find negligible or not worth noticing. I spent too much time with this music and it made me emotionally dead to what I used to listen to. Just need to take a break with Coltrane I guess.

Oh for the love of god...... You spent some time listening to different music and your tastes changed. That is ALL that happened. You can describe that transition using whatever abstract analogies or metaphors you wish ("he sounds green! and pink!"), but that doesn't change the fact that nothing really spectacular is happening, there. (I'm also going to call BS on the synesthesia nonsense that everyone else is claiming. I highly doubt he suddenly developed the condition by listening to new music.)

I happen to hate random music that lacks structure. I prefer to give my music a basic structure, or a frame, and then design around that. Also, when I'm listening to music, I like it when things sometimes happen exactly as I expect them to. It makes it all the more powerful when I hear a section end a bar early, or when I hear an extra note throw into a scale. Does that make me inferior to you? Or superior? Neither. It just means I have different tastes.
Banging on a trash can
Drumming on a street light
#35
Quote by BigFatSandwich

I happen to hate random music that lacks structure. I prefer to give my music a basic structure, or a frame, and then design around that. Also, when I'm listening to music, I like it when things sometimes happen exactly as I expect them to. It makes it all the more powerful when I hear a section end a bar early, or when I hear an extra note throw into a scale. Does that make me inferior to you? Or superior? Neither. It just means I have different tastes.

You are inferior. I'm sorry to say..
#37
Quote by Unrejistered
FUN


Last edited by Muzikh at Sep 30, 2008,
#39
Quote by LordBishek
Define your boundaries.

Who is that? ^^^

It is he who stares into your soul and perchance judges it.
#40
Quote by Muzikh
It is he who stares into your soul and perchance judges it.


I don't have a soul, I sold it for funyuns a long time ago.
They were on special offer.

But seriously man, if you're going to tell someone that they're inferior, at least clarify what standards you're judging them by. I don't understand why you think you're better than him just because your understanding of music happens to be better than his.
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