#1
e---
B-8-
G-7-
D-6-
A-7-
E---


With an E7#9 chord like that, is there a reason why it shouldn't be called an E7b10?
Because really, isn't the Ab an Ab and not a G# because there is already a G in it? So would it be more realistic to call it a E7b10?
Or is it E7#9 just because of the order of the intervals (1 3 5 7 9 11..)?
Quote by Seryaph
You need to douse it in a 20/30/50 ratio of mustard/ketchup/horseradish and stroke it as fast as you can untill the mayonaise squirts out. Then consume.
#2
The 10th is just the 3rd, so it's never really called the 10th. There's already a major 3rd in the chord, so to say E7b3 can be confusing.

Generally, the chord is associated with 7b9 and 9 chords anyway.
#3
It's called a #9 (G or F##) and not a b10 (which is also G or F## or Abb) because there's already a major third (in other words a major 10, G#).

I think I worded that right. If that made no sense, I apologize, I'm tired.

EDIT: These are the notes of the chord, this might help a bit. 1 3 b7 #9/#2.
You see, you can't have a major AND a minor third.
Last edited by food1010 at Sep 29, 2008,
#4
The note is not called G in that chord; it is F##, so you don't violate the rule of having to have all seven letters represented once and only once.

E F## G# A B C# D would be the scale, though the it would be more common to to play a combination of E Mixolydian and E Minor Pentatonic/Blues; this is often called the Mixoblues scale.

Edit: F## (and every double sharpened note) is usually written Fx.

So C## would be Cx=D; G## would be Gx=A, et cetera.

However, D and A should not be written when Cx and Gx are appropriate.
Last edited by bangoodcharlote at Sep 29, 2008,
#5
what they all said

and i like the think of chords as a recipe. its a E7, with an added #9. you know exactly what u have to play.
you are hearing me talk

CHECK OUT MY TUNES ON MY PROFILE

Gear:

laney VC30
tele/jaguar hybrid
Big muff
Small clone chorus
memory boy
Hadrwire RV-7 reverb
DD3 delay
Dunlop Crybaby wah
TS9 overdrive clone
home made tremolo
#6
Wow, after reading these I realize that I did not think things through enough. Haha I totally must've been out of it yesterday. But thanks for all the replies and examples! It's appreciated.
Quote by Seryaph
You need to douse it in a 20/30/50 ratio of mustard/ketchup/horseradish and stroke it as fast as you can untill the mayonaise squirts out. Then consume.
#8
Beyond what has already been said: E7#9 is an altered dominant chord. The altered scale is a scale made by making every possible alteration to a dominant chord, which is done by altering every non-chord tone. The reason it is written as a #9 and not a "b10" is both because the note is not functioning as a third, and because there is no such thing as b10. The third of a chord is not an extension. Beyond this, the major third is vastly superior at establishing tonality than the minor third. In any situation where you have both, the major third is going to win out, and the other is going to be relegated to either a chromatic tone, or a #9 if you're dealing with a dominant chord.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#9
Quote by Archeo Avis
Beyond what has already been said: E7#9 is an altered dominant chord. The altered scale is a scale made by making every possible alteration to a dominant chord, which is done by altering every non-chord tone. The reason it is written as a #9 and not a "b10" is both because the note is not functioning as a third, and because there is no such thing as b10. The third of a chord is not an extension. Beyond this, the major third is vastly superior at establishing tonality than the minor third. In any situation where you have both, the major third is going to win out, and the other is going to be relegated to either a chromatic tone, or a #9 if you're dealing with a dominant chord.


this also becomes apparent when written on conventional score
Here lies a problem that most guitar players face in this day of internet tab and short attention spans — they don't know how to express themselves.

-Nick Layton