#1
I just bought a Washburn X20 and the tremolo arm seems too hard...definitely harder than some of the Fender Squires and other vintage tremolos I've played with. It needs to be grabbed on with the hand to make it work, and I can't do just a little tremolo with my finders on it. Any way to make it any easier?
#2
Remove springs out the back of the guitar. The more springs, the stiffer the wammy bar. Also bend the wammy bar in a vice to make it easier to grab, or try shortening it etc etc etc...
#3
Quote by Meddled
Remove springs out the back of the guitar. The more springs, the stiffer the wammy bar.

100%

Be sure to re-adjust the tension afterwards - you'll need to tighten it after removing the some springs.
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#4
Actually, a longer bar would make it easier to use (more of a "loose" feeling anyways), because the longer the bar, the more leverage you'll have on the bridge. That said, removing springs is the easiest way to go about it. If you've got the 5 spring claw, you can try going down to 3 or even 2 springs, just make sure that they're balanced out across the claw. If you still need less tension, you can try backing the screws that hold the claw into the body out some, but be careful with this. If your tremolo is still too stiff, you might try some heavier strings.
#5
Quote by Stickymongoose
Actually, a longer bar would make it easier to use (more of a "loose" feeling anyways), because the longer the bar, the more leverage you'll have on the bridge. That said, removing springs is the easiest way to go about it. If you've got the 5 spring claw, you can try going down to 3 or even 2 springs, just make sure that they're balanced out across the claw. If you still need less tension, you can try backing the screws that hold the claw into the body out some, but be careful with this. If your tremolo is still too stiff, you might try some heavier strings.

I agree. Removing a spring or maybe 2 should fix it. If not adjust the claw a little bit.
#6
My guitar had 3 springs. I removed the middle one and backed out the claw a little...now it's less stiff...though the G-string's gettin out of tune a little too easily...what to do? Another thing: though its loose now, the change in pitch occurs mainly within a little play of the tremolo arm, but in the Squire Affinity Strat and some of the Aria guitars i checked out, they had the same change in pitch but with the tremolo arm going down fully, and they were lighter still (they had 3 springs though)...all the tremolos were the same vintage type...so why this difference?
Last edited by apakhira at Sep 30, 2008,
#7
Quote by apakhira
My guitar had 2 springs. I removed the middle one and backed out the claw a little...now it's less stiff...though the G-string's gettin out of tune a little too easily...what to do? Another thing: though its loose now, the change in pitch occurs mainly within a little play of the tremolo arm, but in the Squire Affinity Strat and some of the Aria guitars i checked out, they had the same change in pitch but with the tremolo arm going down fully, and they were lighter still (they had 3 springs though)...all the tremolos were the same vintage type...so why this difference?

If two springs on a trem is too tough for you, then the solution is getting rid of your tampons and floral print dresses, girlyman.
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And have you figured out yet -


Life goes by?
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It's you
#10
Yeah we told ya already.

1: Remove Springs
2: Adjust Claw
3: Grow a ****
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