#1
ibasically im only writing in short periods of creativity and they dont last long enough to get anything written properly, does anyone have any advice? and also my songs seem very basic, im having trouble gettign al the different instruments doing something indepepdndent and interstign but sounding well composed at the same time, any help?
#2
my advice is NOT STRESS IT. that is especially important. but keep trying, composing is a skill like playing is, it doesnt come in a day, and the way you practice it is by doing it, and learning what sounds give you what feelings and how the instruments interact


just keep at it and you will be fine
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#4
You need to have something to express or say. Come up with some ideas in your head that you like and try to play them. You have to hear what you want before you can start playing what you want.
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#5
Happens to the best of us. Problem is the best of 'us' havent been writing nearly as long as the actual best. I cant remember who it was, maybe Walt Whitman or Langston Hughes, that before he was ten years old decided that he wanted to be a great writer. So he dedicated himself to writing one poem every day. He reported that most of them werent very good, but he did it. And he was a down-right incredible writer.
#6
I'm guessing you are trying to compose this all by yourself? I think it would definetly help if you had another musician with you, so maybe you could play guitar, and he could play drums, or something like that. Now I don't know your situation, so maybe you can't find another musician to play with.

Quote by bshizzle911
You need to have something to express or say. Come up with some ideas in your head that you like and try to play them. You have to hear what you want before you can start playing what you want.


If you decide to go this route, I would suggest maybe writing some lyrics first. Then you can get more of an idea of what the feel of the song is. Do you want it to be an angry song, happy song, melow song, etc. Hope this helps you.
#7
^ this is one way to do it. personally i always write the music and lyrics seperately and then decide what lyrics best go with each song. in the end though i suggest only doing it when you feel like doing it. archeo will come in here and say "no you have to force yourself to do it over and over and over and over" sometimes even when im not "inspired" i'll still write something and go "hey that sounds really cool i'll keep that" so it is kinda something you need a lot of practice at. remember you don't have to keep/use every little thing you write. i've got songs that are around 4 or 5 years old simply because i haven't found the right parts to fill them out with.
#8
Quote by PenFighter19
Happens to the best of us. Problem is the best of 'us' havent been writing nearly as long as the actual best. I cant remember who it was, maybe Walt Whitman or Langston Hughes, that before he was ten years old decided that he wanted to be a great writer. So he dedicated himself to writing one poem every day. He reported that most of them werent very good, but he did it. And he was a down-right incredible writer.


This. This. This. This. This. This. This. This.

There are not enough italic, bold and underline functions in the world to stress how important that ^^ is. If you want to be good at something, do it. Then do it again. Then do it again. Then do it again. And again and again and again and again and again.
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#9
^ this is true and all people are different. i find that if i just don't want to play guitar or music in general im not going to have objective ears so its going to all be kinda "bleh" even if i do write something interesting. i'd say to do it over and over and over and over again, but only if you want to, to some degree. if you're adamantly against it and would rather watch tv or play video games or something then do that. don't force yourself to do it if its going to feel like work. with that being said, there have a been times where i forced myself to practice and once i started practicing i started having fun and ended up writing some nifty stuff.
#10
I agree with z4twenny, you need to practice alot. Inspiration is everywhere, but even if you aren't inspired, you should just do it. So many people try to write 40 minute prog masterpieces before they can write a 2 minute pop song. They havent practiced enough.

I collect my ideas in a very systematic way, I could spend all day telling you about my method (I will if you want to) but honestly there is no right way to be creative. Everyone, whether conciously or subconciously collects their ideas in a different way.
#11
Quote by Myung-trucci
. So many people try to write 40 minute prog masterpieces before they can write a 2 minute pop song. They havent practiced enough.

this is SOOOOOO true. make sure you can write a simple song before you move into the more advanced "shove 10 parts into a 5 minutes" song
#12
Quote by z4twenny
this is SOOOOOO true. make sure you can write a simple song before you move into the more advanced "shove 10 parts into a 5 minutes" song


There was a guy last week trying to write a Speed Metal Symphony, asking how to do it. When Cacophony wrote that piece they were good enough at compostition to write it. They didnt have to ask on an internet forum!
#13
and also my songs seem very basic, im having trouble gettign al the different instruments doing something indepepdndent and interstign but sounding well composed at the same time, any help?
I think learning some counterpoint would help with that.
Counterpoint is a large field in music theory. It's about having different instruments or "voices" playing different things, but complimenting each other.

This should give you a good idea of what you want to learn:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Counterpoint

And this is a free e-book that should help you learn it:
http://www.gutenberg.org/etext/16342
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#14
Being a good improvisor helps, of course. Because you'd already have a feel of how to handle harmony, chord changes etc. You'd just spend more time on it, and incorporate compositional techniques that you may not use when you're soloing. Look up stuff like Augmented Sixth chords, secondary dominants. They'll really spice up your compositions, at least that's what I use them for.
#15
Whilst theory is a must know, a good way of getting ideas is to think like a 'child'. I had to do some community service at a child-care center and the 4 year old kids always pick up on really strange but cool things like 'that tree looks like a face'. When they do puzzles they try fitting the piece in every position just to see if it works. Then as we grow older we forget these things because of rules we know. So if something sounds like it might work, try it. Even if it sucks, it can teach you about things to avoid. And pay attention to things in the real world, become a good observer. This gives me lots of ideas and metaphors.
#16
Quote by mosh_face
my advice is NOT STRESS IT. that is especially important. but keep trying, composing is a skill like playing is, it doesnt come in a day, and the way you practice it is by doing it, and learning what sounds give you what feelings and how the instruments interact


just keep at it and you will be fine

Exactly this. First of all, you can't expect to write interesting things for every instrument if you haven't written very many songs. Even if you write 50 songs, all ready to be recorded, and you think they're the bomb, those first 50 songs are only one stepping stone in the art of composition. You really have to keep at it, because you're not going to write a masterpiece on your first try. It takes a hell of a lot of practice. Good luck
#17
you know why Beethoven was so good? his dad would force him to stay up practicing until the early morning hours, that's how you get good. You wanna be a good writer, write 100 crappy songs in a row, then write 100 more. Listen to your playing via recording, listen to song 1 and song 100, unless you are a monkey you'll see the improvement.
#18
thanx for all of your helpfull comments, i think i agree the best way to do it for me is too not push it too hard, wait for something good to come and keep on trying to make it as good as it can be, i have very littel time to write so i focus oin the good ideas, and i finally got my band sorted os i got peopl e to bo8unce ideas of off, i have a song on my profile (the vid in black and white) if u wanna see the results of my efforts so far. and again thnk u
#19
Beethoven was famously self critical: he would write, revise, scrap, revise, revise, and he'd work on stuff until he couldn't find anything left to do to his music. I can't remember who it was (it was a poet of repute, can't put a name on it) who noted that works aren't finished but abandoned.
#20
Quote by Nick_
I can't remember who it was (it was a poet of repute, can't put a name on it) who noted that works aren't finished but abandoned.


not to be a nazi, but it was Leonardo Da Vinci
#21
Old thread is old.

but anyway, that ebook on counterpoint is great, are there any other classical harmony ebooks that anyone recommends?