#1
I've gotten to the point where I know the pentatonic minor, and I know how to identify which key a song is in and play in that key, but after jamming with my friend, I feel there is a bit more theory that I should learn.

What I think I have trouble with is phrasing, transitioning out of "boxes", learning "progressions". I've listened to plenty of Hendrix and Page, but I feel that the right way to learn is to learn the theory behind them, rather than learning note for note stuff.

I know I can always google, but does anyone know a good, solid lesson that isn't concerned with scales or technique (my vibrato, etc. is fine)? Thanks.

EDIT: Don't get me wrong, I've also listened to plenty of blues artists such as BB King, Albert King, and SRV, all of whom I love, I'm just looking for more lesson and theory based sources.
Last edited by Shuk at Oct 1, 2008,
#3
google is a good idea, page is not...you should look at other blues artists, hendrix is fine but if you go to the blues subforum we have a list of all the blues guitarists we know (sticked), you should go through them and listen to them. listen and learn.
Feelin the Blues


"The Blues are a simple music and I'm a simple man. But the Blues aren't a science, the Blues can't be broken down like a mathematics. The Blues are a mystery, and mysteries are never as simple as they look" - BB King
#4
^Your sig should read, "...ARE never as simple..." unless King screwed up big time.

Friedman is certainly not a bluesy player, but his ideas about following the chords can be applied to a blues. In an A major blues, emphasize notes in the D7 and E7 chords when those chords are played. I think Marty directly addresses blues playing in that video as well, though I would seek additional sources for blues ideas, as his playing is almost completely devoid of blues phrasing.
#5
If all you know is Hendrix and Page maybe you should try out some of the blues classics like Stevie Ray Vaughan (spelling?) and BB King
#6
Quote by Myung-trucci
If all you know is Hendrix and Page maybe you should try out some of the blues classics like Stevie Ray Vaughan (spelling?) and BB King
Yes, the old guys like SRV, who became famous a good decade after Jimi died.
#7
I prefer SRV to Hendrix anyway, Hendrix is a pretty good player though.

Hendrix was an innovator, where as SRV just took the best parts of heaps of other blues players without making something truly new. He was, however, awesome.
#8
A good place to start with learning blues phrasing is BB King. While his chops aren't very technical, his phrasing is what drives everything he plays anyway. Also learn some blues standards like Sweet Home Chicago, Soul Man, and others of its ilk. Just soloing over the changes in those songs will help a lot with phrasing over a 12 bar form.
#9
Blues aint really theory ground this shits all feeling once you got the basics. Its like learning to talk you learnt the words now you just got to put them together just jam with people, over songs learn solos from others you just get better and better with playing.
#10
Quote by Aesop_Rock
Blues aint really theory ground this shits all feeling once you got the basics. Its like learning to talk you learnt the words now you just got to put them together just jam with people, over songs learn solos from others you just get better and better with playing.


THEORY DOES NOT LIMIT CREATIVITY OR FEELING!!!

Please, never even imply that again!
#11
Quote by bangoodcharlote
^Your sig should read, "...ARE never as simple..." unless King screwed up big time.




NO that would be me screwing up big time...thanks
Feelin the Blues


"The Blues are a simple music and I'm a simple man. But the Blues aren't a science, the Blues can't be broken down like a mathematics. The Blues are a mystery, and mysteries are never as simple as they look" - BB King
#12
Hey guys, don't get me wrong. I know all about the blues people. BB King, Albert King, and I'm certainly a fan of SRV! However, what I'm saying is: listening and learning is great, but I feel I should be taught theory, and I'm looking for sources. Thanks to the first poster for the link.
#13
Look up "Warren Haynes- Electric Blues and Slide Guitar" and "Warren Haynes- Acoustic Slide Guitar and Improvisation".

Suggested listening- Hound Dog Taylor and the House Rockers- Blue Guitar, Blind Willie Johnson- Dark was the Night, Ry Cooder- How Can a Poor Man Stand Such Times and Live, John Lee Hooker- It Serves Me Right to Suffer, Johnny Shines- Ramblin Blues, Delta Pine.

Have fun.

If you want to get deeper into the theory end of blues, I suggest you look up "Joe Pass- The Blue Side of Jazz".