#1
Just got this idea. I'm practicing speed now, by playing different riffs slowly with metronome to get a better accuracy. But sometimes, this gets really boring and make me come up with this idea...

What if i switch out the metronome with songs? Songs usually got a stable bpm and they are much more fun listening too. So can i just play my practice riff/solo on the bpm from the song, and still call it good practice?
#2
It will sound hideous. Exept for when you play it with the song you're actually playing, but then you need to play it at full speed right away.
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#3
Quote by Samothomas
It will sound hideous. Exept for when you play it with the song you're actually playing, but then you need to play it at full speed right away.


Not if you import the song you are trying to learn into an audio program that allows you to slow its tempo. Amplitube has this feature and you should be able to do it with almost any other audio editing application worth its weight.

I do this using Amplitube Metal and play along with it until I have it down and then slowly build up to normal bpm for the song. You can also record your progress and see how much you have improved and where you need improvement.
Gear:
Fender Strat
Epi Joe Pass Signature
Epi LP Plus Top
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#4
Like Rio38, you can always slow it down. Way more fun than with a metronome, but don't give it up. You might always nail a riff while playing along, but if you're trying to build up speed, it doesn't mean you're gonna be able to play other stuff at that speed. It's always good to practice scales/tricky finger patterns etc.. with a metronome and with time you won't have trouble playing along without slowing down the song
#5
That's how guitarists practiced in the days before computers :P

Jam along with the radio but just use it as a variable metronome. Focus on the beat instead of the melodies. It really is good practice, somtimes when I'm bored I'll pull up a random AM station that plays songs I don't recognize so I'm not tempted to try to follow the riffs. You don't need to import anything and you don't need to worry if it sounds good or not; you're the only one listening to it. It's also good practice for playing with a band, because you'll run into a variety of different beats and rhythems.

Go for it man. It's great practice.
-Guitar Gear-
1995 American Fender Strat, EMG 85 pup
Randall RH200 Head
Marshall 1960a Cab
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-Bass Gear-
Spector Legend 4 bass
Washburn Bantam bass
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