#1
Hey I recently became fond of alternate tunings, and alot of times I'm tuning my B string up, sometimes as high as a D, and Im always afraid that the string is going to snap. I actually ran out of B strings, so i put in an E string instead, so i was wondering, will this hurt the guitar? like the difference in tension or something? Also does changing the tuning of the guitar often wear the strings out faster? I mainly do this on my acoustic guitar if that affects anything
Epiphone G-310 SG
Epiphone Hummingbird
Yamaha CG-101
Peavey Classic 30
#2
I change my strings tunings 5-6 times a day and i've had my strings on my guitar for about 10 months now. it doesn't seem to do anything to me.
#3
I assume you mean a thin E string and not a thick one :P

If so, the difference in tension will be too little to do anything considerable to your neck. Yeah, and changing tunings often will wear the strings out faster.

Quote by Nevermind1299
I change my strings tunings 5-6 times a day and i've had my strings on my guitar for about 10 months now. it doesn't seem to do anything to me.


Put a new set of strings on it, it'll sound a million times nicer.
#4
If you mean your 2nd string, yes it will create less tension on the higher portion of the neck, resulting in your lower strings pulling with more power than your higher strings, and twisting the neck.

If you are using a 7 string guitar, and placing an E string in place of the B, there will not be equal tension there, yes. This may result in a twisting of the neck, but your higher strings wont twist too much. For the time being, sure it's fine. But try to get those spare B's as soon as possible.
Last edited by iBlarg at Sep 30, 2008,
#5
kk thanks, yea I'm probably going to change the strings every month or 2 cause who doesn't love the feel and sound of brand new strings?
Epiphone G-310 SG
Epiphone Hummingbird
Yamaha CG-101
Peavey Classic 30
#6
Quote by UncleCthulhu

Put a new set of strings on it, it'll sound a million times nicer.

I will, when I can afford it.
Getting laid off sucks, so I can't afford strings as much as I could. Elixirs last forever though, and they still sound practically new, so i'm good for now.
#7
Quote by iBlarg
If you mean your 2nd string, yes it will create less tension on the higher portion of the neck, resulting in your lower strings pulling with more power than your higher strings, and twisting the neck.

If you are using a 7 string guitar, and placing an E string in place of the B, there will not be equal tension there, yes. This may result in a twisting of the neck, but your higher strings wont twist too much. For the time being, sure it's fine. But try to get those spare B's as soon as possible.


I personally don't believe .003 of an inch thickness difference could amount to that much damage. . .. not only is it highly unlikely, it's improbable and impossible. . . can you measure .003 inches? lets say .015 is about a 64th of an inch. . . which you can barely see. Wait a second, I think you are talking about an E3(3rd octave) string.. . . about .050, which a low B can be around .062, so that's still not even a 64th of an inch difference in thickness, so even then it would be highly unlikely(not going to say impossible) to cause damage to the neck.
Quote by paranoid joker

Metal, should kick you in the nuts, after you catch it messing around with your girlfriend.
and then make a sandwhich in your house and walk out.


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#8
Yea I'm talking about the High E not the low E (sorry for the confusion)
Epiphone G-310 SG
Epiphone Hummingbird
Yamaha CG-101
Peavey Classic 30
#9
i believe that all that information regarding a 'twisting of the neck' is over dramatising of the whole theory behind the guitar need for 'even tension'. the guitar has a metal rod running through the neck, it'll be a micoscopic difference.

if u have a floating bridge, the difference in guitar string thickness and tension MIGHT be noticeable in the needing to change the intonation a bit... that all.

long story short -> you should be absolutely fine to replace the string.